200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

JosephDurham

So, tomorrow morning I was considering fixing breakfast before I head off to work on the new 425. But, I do not think it will take much fuel to cook eggs and bacon. Then I got to thinking about going out and firing up one of the new lanterns. 


All of this leads me to wonder, is it ok to leave fuel in my canisters?  I’m only using white gas at the present time; I don’t believe I’ll ever use gasoline unless I am in a crisis and it is the only source. If it is ok, how long will it be ok?  Is it ok to leave everything pressurized?  What do you recommend?  


Sorry for all of the questions, but believe it or not, I do truly appreciate everyone’s input!  I truly do. 


thank you in advance,

Joseph

Joseph Durham

ICCC #1954
Looking for bday lantern 10/84

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JosephDurham
I will add, all of my camping gear, stoves and lanterns are stored in my attached garage. In the summer it gets very hot in the garage and in the summer, it has gotten unbelievably cold in there. I store a ton of cast iron in there and have for years, and I’ve never had any issues from them being out in the change in temp and humidity. 

Joseph Durham

ICCC #1954
Looking for bday lantern 10/84

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Hot Diggity
Fueled yes, pressurized maybe.  

I have lanterns that hang outside, have been there for years.  Always fueled, always with the pressure left in the fount. I can light them with a sparkie almost as fast as flipping a light switch.  They are outdoors.
If they leak, it will dry before I even notice it.

Indoor lamps and lanterns do get the pressure relieved.  Just in case.

I still have perfectly good Coleman fuel from 1971.  It has a preservative effect if left in the lantern.

Your local fire Marshall may still have an issue with your collection.  You must educate  him. ðŸ˜Ž
Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
Milspec Syndicate #510
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0510
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #12
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #510
Coleman Slant Saver #510
Frank Appreciation Syndicate Member #2
Tinker, Toy maker, Trash picker, Wickie, Lamp loon
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Rustytank
Hot Diggity wrote:
Fueled yes, pressurized maybe.  

I have lanterns that hang outside, have been there for years.  Always fueled, always with the pressure left in the fount. I can light them with a sparkie almost as fast as flipping a light switch.  They are outdoors.
If they leak, it will dry before I even notice it.

Indoor lamps and lanterns do get the pressure relieved.  Just in case.

I still have perfectly good Coleman fuel from 1971.  It has a preservative effect if left in the lantern.

Your local fire Marshall may still have an issue with your collection.  You must educate  him. Ã°Å¸ËœÅ½

I don't know how the fire Marshall would see your collection but Hot Diggity is right on here.
275 Appreciation Syndicate #0245
Looking for birthday lanterns 11/58, 3/68, 3/73, 11/96, 6/97, 11/97, 12/00
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TwoCanoes
I store mine with the fuel in them.  I only use white gas, never RUG.  If I use it frequently, I don't release the pressure, but if it's going to be in storage for more than a day or two, I release the pressure.
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JosephDurham
Thank you everyone. I appreciate all of your help!

Joseph Durham

ICCC #1954
Looking for bday lantern 10/84

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