Sportsman globe
Blow out price
Was $19
Now $8
Dmacp
I recently added another page to my book of Petromax war stories. I was lucky, didn't burn my house down, and I discovered a problem which I am going to pass along. I think it is a serious problem.

I bought this Chinese/US made 500CP Petromax clone on ebay. I see a few others also bought one. The lantern has a massive burner assembly which is difficult to preheat. I got mine preheated, lit, then had the needle bend over, so I replaced the jet and needle with genuine Petromax parts.

The lantern burned well the first few times then suddenly emitted a huge fireball extending about 2 feet above the lantern. I shut it down, tore it down and discovered the jet was loose. Cussing at my own stupidity, I tightened the jet and re-lit the lantern. All was well, or so I thought. I had two more fireballs about a week apart. Both times the jet was loose. I tightened it as much as I dared. A week later, while hanging on a hook on my front porch, another huge fireball erupted. I was some distance away when it dawned on me that was a bad idea. As I turned around the lantern erupted into this huge fireball, scorching my rafters and darn near starting the roof on fire. First thing I checked was the jet. It was loose. For some reason the heat/cool cycles on this lantern loosen up the jet. The subtle warnings are present if you know what to look for. One, the lantern dims, because a small flame has started at the jet. The flame can be seen between the vent holes if you look. As the jet continues to loosen, mixture under pressure suddenly erupts and overwhelms the hot burner, producing this fireball.

My start up procedure now includes tightening the jet. Every time. And frequently it is loose.

This is simply a recipe for disaster. It is dangerous as hell. There appears to be some kind of flaw which causes this. The machining and threading on the vaporizer seem OK, not great but OK. Being a 500 CP Petromax it roars when burning normally. Adding that much hot vaporized fuel to such a huge burner can cause a spectacular fire.

If you own one of these lanterns, check the jet for tightness. Frequently.
Knowing what I know now, I would not recommend this lantern to anybody. I can't be the only one having this problem-so please, beware.

Dan


Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
HillCountry
Wow, a disaster waiting to happen! Dan, you didn't mention which brand it was. I only own a real Petromax and a Butterfly. I'll keep an eye on the Butterfly!
Tim - ICCC Member #1217
Quote
Chucker
Sea Anchor?
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
Quote
Dmacp
I'm still a bit reluctant to blackball the seller, I'm not sure it's his fault, and at this point I am not sure exactly why this lantern behaves in this manner. I own many Petromax lanterns, this has never happened to me. The jet I installed was an original purchased from an ebay seller in Thailand. I didn't check to see if it was steel, but will on the next round.

I keep thinking I am overlooking something, but have not found out what.

Dan
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
JimDouglasJr
Possible fixes. Slightly mar the threads, or use some of that muffler mender on them.  That should seal them up.
Kyle. Kaptain Kamplite - America's Finest Lantern Fettler.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate and 243 Blues Member #0031 &  J.C. Higgins aficionado.
“If you light a lamp for someone else, it will also brighten your path.” Buddhist quote.  Brand-X Super Hoarder.
Quote
Dmacp
That's no problem for me. But that is because I know lanterns. I'm imagining some mainstream person buying one of these. They'd never know until it's too late.
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
parris001
Clones. There's a love/hate relationship there. I've seen items cloned (Daedong is just as good as a Kubota) where the differences are negligible. When it comes to smaller items though, it seems, small differences in machining and materials used are the real killer. And call me killjoy, but crap from China is just that. CRAP!!!!!
Quote
Lanterndude
First off, Dan, thank you for posting this very important information on the 'clone Petromax' lantern.

You see, a couple of weeks ago I purchased a clone Petromax lantern, ANCHOR 950 (from this place: http://www.majorsurplus.com/Nickel-Plated-Steel-Kerosene-Hurricane-Lantern-P16698.aspx) because of the price. This is the first time that I'm hearing anything about it possibly flaring up in a fireball!
I wanted to try out a kerosene lantern, but as we all know the term "You get what you pay for" and knowing this I went ahead and still felt I would give it a shot, yes even after reading all the reviews. Most were postive but those few that were negative had nothing to do with what the original post here, described as a "fire ball flame up"!
Since it's arrival I have only messed with it just once. Never actually getting it to light is my main problem right now. Yes, I am using the right Kerosene as fuel. I've followed the directions to a tee, even read that the start up is the exact as a regular Petromax lantern and followed those instructions as well but no go. Anyway I've yet to go back and mess with it on trying to start it up again.

Dan, could it be possible if you could post any pictures of the areas that you spoke about in your original post?
I'd be very grateful to ya!

Also Kyle what exactly is "muffler mending" method? What is used in this process? Does it involve welding or soldering, or ?

Again, thanks Dan for your the tip on this, very important info!

"TURD" #0132
"MILSPEC" #0024

Quote
Nuke
Thank you for the information, this is a real interesting effect.
As I am from Germany I own several of these lantern including clones.
So far I never observerd anything like this. Not that I never had a loose tip, but this leads usually to a small flame at the tip, a terrible sound and sometimes the u shaped pipe starts to glow like hell.
I can only guess that they used materials with significantly different expansion coefficients for the tip and the burner assembly. Can you see a difference in color of the materials?

Peter

Quote
Dmacp
No, not really. The jet may be steel but it happened with a factory jet as well-they gave me 1 spare.
I deburred the hole and threads, the factory de-burring left something to be desired.

The darn thing seals fine through about 3 heats. Then it lets go-a little at first, then it opens up and floods the hot lantern with fully vaporized mixture. The only warning you get is when the lantern dims slightly and will not clean out. That's because the (small) flame is causing air starvation at the burner. Then the small flame gets big-in a hurry. One thing I forgot to mention. This particular lantern has a stopcock. But it is still 30 seconds until it burns out after closing it.
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
brucesheehe
Literally playing with fire.  Sounds like it was designed by the engineering team that produced the 501 stove.
Bruce Sheehe
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
Quote
curlyjoe_99
I will offer that the problem is that you are mixing a genuine petromax part with the clone and the threads between the two are at the edge of their tolerances.

lots of folks notice similar things when they swap an SMP MILSPEC part to a coleman one from the 50's.
Robert (AKA Curly)-- Heart-of-Texas! "Keep 'Em Working"  
MILSPEC_OPS & 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #9999

In Search of (ISO): evidence of a 220/228 series lantern dated 2/63    

Quote
Lanterndude
Very good and valid point to consider, IMO.


curlyjoe_99 wrote:
I will offer that the problem is that you are mixing a genuine petromax part with the clone and the threads between the two are at the edge of their tolerances.

lots of folks notice similar things when they swap an SMP MILSPEC part to a coleman one from the 50's.

"TURD" #0132
"MILSPEC" #0024

Quote
egroscup
 I have seen that happen on the clones before but never had it get to the huge fireball point. The muffler mender paste on the threads solves that problem. E.
The year 2259, the place Babylon 5
Erik
Quote
dsk
Some lamps are just not worth it:  Clipboard2.jpg  This were just not worth the job, so I just put in an 18W fluorescent lamp.  not drilled a hole, sor it is just to start over if I ever get that idea.  Hangs between my front door and the road.

dsk
dsk
(Dag Ståle)
Quote
Lanterndude
O K, quick update on the ANCHOR 950 kerosene lantern (Petromax clone). I messed with it today finally got it going. In an earlier post I said how I had problems getting it to light up and that the manometer gauge was not working, well the problem was I just was not pumping it hard enough or enough. Today that all changed, the manometer works, got sufficient pressure and it lights up nicely. Yea and it's a bright bastard too! Still though, concerned about the fireball flare up situation!

"TURD" #0132
"MILSPEC" #0024

Quote
Dmacp
An Anchor 950 is not the lantern I had a problem with. I have had very few problems with the other Petromax types. Never had a jet come loose repeatedly until this one.

But, knowing what I know now, I would not turn my back on a burning Petromax. Reading the reports published elsewhere by Neil McRae, these lanterns are not quite as safe as a Coleman lantern. There are a few caveats and ignoring them would be foolish.

Use a flame plate to protect the soldered fount from a broken mantle.
don't use gasoline ever, no matter what the label says.
Watch the mantles for cracks or holes which can melt a solder joint with a jet of flame.
Watch for back burn, or flame inside the "J" tube, Shut it down if this happens. It makes a peculiar noise.
Make sure the foot valve seals before trying the rapid preheater.
And, make sure the jet is tight-rarely a problem but it happens.

I'm not trying to scare off Petromax users. Just cautioning.
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
Lanterndude
All good points and totally understandable.


Dmacp wrote:
An Anchor 950 is not the lantern I had a problem with. I have had very few problems with the other Petromax types. Never had a jet come loose repeatedly until this one.

But, knowing what I know now, I would not turn my back on a burning Petromax. Reading the reports published elsewhere by Neil McCrae, these lanterns are not quite as safe as a Coleman lantern. There are a few caveats and ignoring them would be foolish.

Use a flame plate to protect the soldered fount from a broken mantle.
don't use gasoline ever, no matter what the label says.
Watch the mantles for cracks or holes which can melt a solder joint with a jet of flame.
Watch for back burn, or flame inside the "J" tube, Shut it down if this happens. It makes a peculiar noise.
Make sure the foot valve seals before trying the rapid preheater.
And, make sure the jet is tight-rarely a problem but it happens.

I'm not trying to scare off Petromax users. Just cautioning.

"TURD" #0132
"MILSPEC" #0024

Quote
Conte
Oh yeah. I have a 150cp river trail that does the exact same thing.

I call it my Christmas Story furnace lantern. I've spent many hours swearing at it while working on it to figure out why it was doing these things.

The jet is not the only thing that comes loose and causes this so watch out.


When I use this lantern I do what I call a PLI, pre lighting inspecting.

I take the top off, tighten the jet, check the burner, make sure both the ceramic burner and it's adaptor are snug, once it checks out, then I light it. It'll run fine for hours after that.

If i don't PLI, it never fails, I get vent flames. Luckily it's not quite as much flames so it's just a stinky nuisance rather than a fire hazard.

Quote
Dmacp
Quote:
These are scary lanterns, full of drama [flames], which is why I keep messing with them , so much adrenaline going on when flames shoot out [sFun_mischieviousbig]


Yeah. Me too.
Us lantern guys lead exciting lives.
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
Guff
Dan, that is a strange but worrying problem you have described. I have quite a few of these clones as well as the "real deal" european brands with the Preston ring generator and, fortunately for me, I have not experienced that problem to date.
There are only a few things that can cause the jet to work loose such as a slight difference in the compatability in the machining of the threads, not allowing a good engagement of the jet to generator tip. Different metals used in jet and generator causing different expansion between these parts, or worn threads. I have seen replacement jets for these lanterns for sale on ebay in both brass and steel (maybe stainless steel) from Asia.
It may pay to inspect the the top the generator, where the jet screws into, with a magnifing glass to see if a fine crack has developed there, as that could open up when the generator gets hot and maybe cause the generator to loosen. I had a Q99 generator with a very fine stress crack in it that would not leak in a pressure dunk test, but would open up when it got hot in operation.
Other than those comments I don't know else could cause that problem, but please do let us know if you find what is causing it to do that.

Keith.   
Quote
Conte
couchpilot wrote:
If you keep at it , you'll understand how to tweak it to run correctly,

On my butterfly 828, I had to overhaul it quite a bit before it would stay lit more than 15 minutes without flamng up:
I needed to drill the hole where the jet fits into the cap, since it wouldn't even sit properly,
I also had to set the height of the mixing tube to the 14.5 mm. The factory setting was way off, at around 10mm.
I couldn't get any pressure from the pump. I discovered metal shavings in the valve. I cleaned it up, got a better leather cup, and that fixed this issue
Next, the lantern didn't hold the pressure: The needle was broken into the jet. Got a new needle, cleaned the jet nozzle.
Screwed all the fittings thight, and applied muffler mender on all the threads exposed to heat.

First real light was interresting, that rapid lighter is something else!

I had it running for about 2 hours without issues.

One important thing: always keep enough pressure in the tank, otherwise, flames will go up in the mixing tube, and it could turn bright red! That happened on my Britelyt , and blued most of the nickel on the cap ;(

Benoit



Really? I just got a butterfly myself.

The air gap was 11 mm I set it to 13 mm as per a 350cp spec I found before I even lit it up.

I'm trying it at 14.2 now, but I swear it burned less smelly and just as well at 13 mm.

When I first pumped it up, kero leaked into the pump. When I removed the check valve, half came out the other half fell in the tank. I sanded and polished the check valve seal point in hopes to get a better seal. So far so good.

After these tweeks it seems to run reliably. I figure I'll still do PLIs on it for a while before I trust it completely. It seems to stay tight and has not given me any flaming issues like my river trail.

Oh yeah, and the pressure guage sucks brutal balls. Didn't work smooth. Tried to tweek it and made it worse. Will probably replace it. The weird foam gasket on it also wore out already.

Oddly enough, the river trail almost seems better quality. It's guage works perfect smooth.
Quote
Lanterndude
This is just an update about my experience that I had posted earlier about the ANCHOR 950 (Petromax clone).

First off,  yes I did follow the manufacturers instructions that came with the lantern. 

To me I found the original instructions kind of vague.

The first time I messed with it (remember this was my very first time messing with a kerosene lantern as well as a Anchor or Petromax lantern didn't know it was a Petromax clone. I am used to the Coleman type lanterns used with Coleman fuel) I pumped the lantern and while counting the pumps I noticed that the manometer needle would not move. So I continued to pump and well simply no go on the lantern.

The next time I pumped faster and harder and well the results were much better. This was a first time experience for me using kerosene and this type of lantern.

After the second time messing with it I had success ligthing it and experienced the following:


Specifically, this is what I found out when learning how to start the ANCHOR 950 (Petromax clone). Others may experience differently.

As stated in the instructions, the "Preheat" cold-start process needs to take place. I performed the 'hard-start' process. Afterwards, the actual lighting can take place, once the 'Igniter is lit, then "s-l-o-w-l-y" the "RED KNOB" is turned, from the 12 O'clock position, 'clock-wise little by little, then it lights.

You see what I found out the first few times when lighting the lantern, when turning the "RED KNOB" even steadily slowly (as the instructions say to do) I would get or encounter the fireball like flare up of flames! Even following the instructions which tells me to turn the "RED KNOB" slowly, there is much build up of gas pressure being emitted at a fast rate. When this happens, along with lighting the igniter flame your going to experience a 'fireball of flames flare up!" This happened a few times, then I snapped and just gently and lightly turned the "RED KNOB" ever so slightly and then "poof" the lantern lit!?

So what does all this tell me? It tells me that when starting the lantern I need to 'gently and very, very, very slowly turn the RED KNOB ever so lightly in order for the lantern to light properly. Once lit then you can turn the RED KNOB's small pointed arrow all the way down, to the 6 O'clock position.

Well, this is just my experience in the process with dealing with the ANCHOR 950. I am new to the clone Petromax lanterns and new to kerosene lanterns in general.

I may be wrong, who knows, I just know that this is what I experienced and maybe it will go different for me next time? But I will perform the same process the same exact way and see what happens.

I had it lit and going on last night for several hours and it sure emits a very bright light that's for sure!


P.S. The following is a response to my question on the ANCHOR 950 lantern, in another forum concerning Kerosene lanterns usage:


Kerosene is much less volatile than Coleman fuel so the vapouriser (generator) and burner need to be preheated fully before satisfactory vapourisation will occur. This will take around a minute with the rapid pre-heater and 2-3 minutes if you prime with alcohol. You also need to take into account ambient temperature and windspeed when priming.

It's also important to realise that even with sufficient priming, the vapouriser and burner aren't initially that much above the boiling point of kerosene. Therefore, if the tank pressure is too high or you open the valve too quickly, the vapouriser is flooded with cold kerosene which drops its temperature below boiling point and you get a massive flare-up caused by liquid fuel burning.

Take things a little slower and easier when starting with a kerosene lantern. It doesn't all have to happen straightaway. 

"TURD" #0132
"MILSPEC" #0024

Quote
Macburner
I have been burning Pertromax types for years and they can have safety issues. When I am fitting a jet I always use a little copper slip paste on the threads. This ensures a good seal which is important because any leak here will give a poor burn and possible blow back into the mixing chamber but it also stops the jet unscrewing in use. Copper paste is handy stuff to have around because it can also be used as a joint sealer for generator fitters and any other brass to brass joints. ::Neil::

Pluralitas non est ponenda sine neccesitate

 Author-The Pressure Lamp Catalogue (PLC).

Neil A. McRae. ICCC #306. Director International Guild of Lamp Researchers Ltd.

Quote
Weirdnerd
Excellent post, good points to consider.  I have been using a petromax 829 ( 1964 era)and a Hipolito 500 (1954 era, based on the preheater lever) for the last two years almost daily, they do get "loose" once in a while, it pays to check for J tube gap clearance, it creeps, also, the Jet tips need to be inspected regularly, I notice that sometimes the lantern starts getting dim, or that the J tube starts getting cherry, it says " time for a check" and tighten the jet, it is good practice to inspect the lantern once in a while for leaks, as the rubber parts tend to "seat" or stop sealing, I have noticed that the filler cap gasket on the Hipolito is at the very end of the threads, so it is almost time to replace the gasket...little things to be aware, remember that the design is from almost 90 years ago, and it has not changed or improved, so it has quirks...like any old car.
Can't sleep, squirrels will eat me....

If you need a Sun Flame Generator Model 100-107 ( for Sunflame lanterns models 105, 106, 107 and 110) give me a PM, I have close to 80 of those, 15 bucks each.


Werner
Quote
Dmacp
I'll try the copper paste. I have a bottle of it.  I didn't see any cracks at last inspection. There was some machining burrs which I removed.  I'm getting ready to fire it up now, so I checked the jet. Got about 1/3 of a turn on it. 
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
Deanofid
Weirdnerd wrote:
remember that the design is from almost 90 years ago...

You'd think they would have fixed this problem by now...   [wink]
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
Quote
Weirdnerd
deanofid wrote:
Weirdnerd wrote:
remember that the design is from almost 90 years ago...

You'd think they would have fixed this problem by now...   [wink]


Why to fix something that works?...hehehe

I see Petromax lanterns as big carburetors, they require some maintenance to work as intended. [smile]
Can't sleep, squirrels will eat me....

If you need a Sun Flame Generator Model 100-107 ( for Sunflame lanterns models 105, 106, 107 and 110) give me a PM, I have close to 80 of those, 15 bucks each.


Werner
Quote
Deanofid
Well, you know..  After a while you'd think they would notice and do something about it.
Triumph motorcycles leaked for 50 years, but they finally got 'em to stop.  [rofl]
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
Quote
Dmacp
Stop leaking? Better check the oil. It may be out.
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
jaellis01
Another Petromax clone issue to consider. and a reason to conduct a pre-light check.

I was recently getting ready to light my Wenzel.  I had to replace the mantle.  As I touched the ceramic nozzle, it crumbled into pieces. I can only imagine what would a have happened had the lantern been alight.  I am not sure if I had previously tightened the nozzle too much or not.  Either way, it gives me a reason to check the lantern thoroughly before I get a flame near it.

Final thought, no matter what brand of lantern you are lighting, it's important to remember that they get HOT, QUICKLY.  I keep a set of mechanics gloves near and use them whenever I do anything with a running lantern. (even if its just to move it to a hook or new spot).  I have a very nice scar from a 200A to remind me of that.
The Coleman Blue's 243's #105
MilSpec Syndicate #1985

Quote
andylate
"The pressure gauges are definitively not precision instruments. Mine, with no pressure in the tank, indicates 1atm."

Shouldn't it? [smile]

Andy
Quote
Ed66Horan
I'll bite on that hook Andy, Lol. It should read 1 atm. 0 atm would be vacuum.

Ed

Sears Collector Club #66  MilSpecOps #0030 
ICCC # 1575  Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate  #212

Quote
Dmacp
Quote:
Shouldn't it?

No it shouldn't. You are talking about an absolute pressure gauge. They sit at atmospheric pressure. Airplanes use them. If it is a supercharged engine the gauge will drop below atmospheric pressure on start up. As you come up on the throttle the gauge will come up above atmospheric pressure as the blower cuts in.

A normally aspirated engine sees atmospheric pressure at full throttle, all vacuum has been dumped from the intake system. Regardless of throttle position.

Most automotive (and lantern) gauges sit on zero at atmospheric pressure (14.65 PSI, 29.92" Hg or 760mm Hg). They show only boost or relative pressure.

The Petromax gauges are not accurate at all. Or if it is accurate, it's a coincidence.

I don't like to call them manometers, as a manometer (to me) is usually a glass tube filled with fluid of a certain density, one end open to the atmosphere. A laboratory instrument.

Add the atmospheric pressure to the gauge pressure to get pressure absolute.

1 inch of mercury = 2.02 PSI. Cars use PSI, aircraft use inches of mercury. Don't know why.
dan
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
Weirdnerd
Dmacp wrote:
Stop leaking? Better check the oil. It may be out.


If it is a British engine and does not leak oil, it has no oil.

Lucas was created to fulfill the desperation quote of British engine enthusiasts.

Etc etc...

Disclaimer, I have worked on Hawker airplanes, and I am sure the devil was leading the designing team.
Can't sleep, squirrels will eat me....

If you need a Sun Flame Generator Model 100-107 ( for Sunflame lanterns models 105, 106, 107 and 110) give me a PM, I have close to 80 of those, 15 bucks each.


Werner
Quote
Ed66Horan
Think I'll stick with Coleman products. Sounds like too many variables to get those things running.   

Ed

Sears Collector Club #66  MilSpecOps #0030 
ICCC # 1575  Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate  #212

Quote
andylate
A smile usually indicates a joke. I understand that pressure gages normally indicate pressure over atmosphere.
Quote
OMGB
I have a Brite Lyte and a Wenzel/BL Frankie. Jeez, the buttload of trouble I've had with both over the last 10 years. back flow into the pump, nozzle dropped off when lit, jet working loose, glass cracking, holes in those crappy mantles, you name it I've seen it. I'd love to get rid of both of mine and all of their spare parts. Anybody live in SoCal want a couple? I'm willing to deal.
R J Talley James Madison Fellow Saugus, CA

"To do is to be" ... Descartes
"To be is to do" .... Voltaire
"Do be do be do" ... Sinatra
Quote
XxKnivesNGunsxX
These lanterns are a bit of a trip but man when they are goin they really go. Extremely bright and very steady. The only example I have is an original aida 1500. It came with original parts. I haven't had an issue with the gen Tip loosening but I'll be sure to check it every now and then. Mine is pretty reliable however I don't run any weird fuel in it either. It gets straight kero. No Amish mix. 100 percent kero
Quote
Dmacp
Quote:
These lanterns are a bit of a trip but man when they are goin they really go.


Well, I've got to agree with you-in more ways than one!
Dan
ICCC member #604
Quote
Conte

I recently figured out a couple tricks to solve some of these issues.

 

I applied them to my nuisance River Trail 150 and so far after many burns it's running better and more reliable then ever. 

First trick is to make sure the generator rod is set right. In my RT is was too high and impacting the jet a bit. Just enough that maybe it helps it get loose.


Assuming that's fine, the next step is an armorers trick. I use it all the time when installing valves into fonts when I find myself needing to time them tight.

 Use some grease and grease the threads on the nipple/jet. Also, grease the base of it where it will seal at the top of the gen.

Then you will find you can safely torque it on tighter than before when it was dry. On my RT150, it has yet to come loose, whereas before, without fail, it would need to be tightened before every lighting.


The next thing I did was use some copper foil around the end of the U tube threads where the nozzle adapter screws on. The adapter usually doesn't come loose, but I figured I would do this for extra seal and good measure.

And Finally, one of the best tricks I've found thus far, I can't recall where I read this on the internet, but I stumbled on it, some hand soap.
I have that common softsoap stuff, put a glob of that on the ceramic burner threads and spread it around.

Install the ceramic burner finger tight, you can't really torque it, that's how I broke my last one.
Just snug it up.

No word of a lie, that RT150 burner would always come loose. It would typically migrate at least 1mm after every burn, but since I tried this, it has not budged. I'm blown away.

I guess the soap get reduced to a kind of tar from the heat, and it both locks the threads and seals the joint. I have not taken the burner off to see what happened to the soap, I dont' want to. That lamp works so well now, I want to see how long it will last without service.

 

Quote
mcdugal2
I've used a dab of muffler cement in all of those places...
Phil Rhoades ICCC# 1125
The Coleman Blue's 243's. #035

"I'm a man, but I can Change, if I have to, I guess." - Red Green
Quote
HappyKamper
Lanterndude wrote:

Specifically, this is what I found out when learning how to start the ANCHOR 950 (Petromax clone). Others may experience differently.

As stated in the instructions, the "Preheat" cold-start process needs to take place. I performed the 'hard-start' process. Afterwards, the actual lighting can take place, once the 'Igniter is lit, then "s-l-o-w-l-y" the "RED KNOB" is turned, from the 12 O'clock position, 'clock-wise little by little, then it lights.

You see what I found out the first few times when lighting the lantern, when turning the "RED KNOB" even steadily slowly (as the instructions say to do) I would get or encounter the fireball like flare up of flames! Even following the instructions which tells me to turn the "RED KNOB" slowly, there is much build up of gas pressure being emitted at a fast rate. When this happens, along with lighting the igniter flame your going to experience a 'fireball of flames flare up!" This happened a few times, then I snapped and just gently and lightly turned the "RED KNOB" ever so slightly and then "poof" the lantern lit!?

There is also a "soft-start" process, in which you preheat with NO PRESSURE in the fount and the valve wide open. After a minute or so of preheating, you pump it a few times, then some more, gradually building up pressure. After the lantern is warmed up, you can pump it up to operating pressure. This way you don't flood it and make a fireball.

Clayton, Great Lakes Coleman Collector, B'wanna's Porter

MilSpecOps #0009

 

II Chronicles 7:14
If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Distributor of  [2re05zq] [wanl1k] [2uhrggl]  NOS & Used Generators, Valves, Burners, non-cracked Founts, Vents, and other parts!

Quote
Conte
mcdugal2 wrote:
I've used a dab of muffler cement in all of those places...


Is that stuff non permanent?

I sought out my solutions cause I did not want anything permanent.
Quote
Deanofid
Conte wrote:
mcdugal2 wrote:
I've used a dab of muffler cement in all of those places...


Is that stuff non permanent?

Yes, it's non-permanent.  The brand I have looks to me exactly like refractory cement
I used to use for some welding chores.  It's a paste, and when it gets hot it dries into
sort of a clay.  It will come off fairly easily using a pick. 
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
Quote
Weirdnerd
I have to say: this "How to" manual is a MUST for everybody who has a Petromax or clone, followed as intended it will solve 99% of all the problems you may find on this design, your mileage may vary, but it is probably the best thing I have ever found on internet.

Gentlemen, the Petromax holy manual!


http://light.papo-art.com/tech-n-info/Petromax_technical/restore_pmax_content.html
Can't sleep, squirrels will eat me....

If you need a Sun Flame Generator Model 100-107 ( for Sunflame lanterns models 105, 106, 107 and 110) give me a PM, I have close to 80 of those, 15 bucks each.


Werner
Quote
gwrocen
Hi all,
I have a Petromax #829/500.
Bouught it new in 2005.
I had the same problem as Dan is having.
The generator tip and the ceramic caps kept coming loose creating fireballs.
New parts and phone calls to the service department didn't help.

Finally, in 2008, I put muffler cement on the generator tip threads and
on the ceramic burner cap threads and have had no problems since.

Nice bright lantern but the smell is terrible - I use it outside only!
I know that they are not to be used in an enclosed space.

Thanks.
George
Quote
philbotha
@George, Normally, there should be virtually no smell.
It is possible that you may have a very small fuel leak on the vapouriser jamb nut, the control valve stem seal or even the quick start jet/seal. The heat of the running lantern would evaporate the leaking kerosene as fast as it comes out and it would cause the smell you describe. When the lantern is running & hot, look closely for a tiny stream of smoke/vapour from any parts near the fount or inside the globe cage. That is how I discovered and cured this problem on mine. YMMV
-Phil

Favourites: 238B 6/50, Petromax 816 lamp, Petromax 827 lantern, Primus 1020, 1060, 1001, Radius 108, Optimus 1200, 246B 5/41 241A 5/52, Veritas Gloria lamp 1922, Gloria Oxo-Gas 1913 The Evening Star 1924 lamp, The Evening Star 1922 lantern, Sunflame 104(US), Sunflame 106(UK), Bialaddin 300X,TL10, BR49, PL53,
Stoves: Coleman 425B, Primus 96, 523, 535, Optimus 111, Radius 43, Speedmaster 500 D/38

275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0181 The only one in Africa?
Coleman Blue's 243's. registration #133 (the fourth known 243K)
Quote
Welcome to the Coleman Collectors Forum, an international forum of Coleman enthusiast and collectors, as such people from all over the world come here to read about Coleman collecting, repair, and to meet and make friends. The pages contained here are intended for the use of amateur collectors and people interested in Coleman collecting, restoration and repair as a hobby. It goes without saying to refrain from political posts, personal attacks and inflammatory posts.

Please note, all postings are the personal opinions of the members posting, the owner, administrators and moderators of the forum do not warrant the accuracy of posted information or endorse the safety of such.