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Leviticus Tomethreus Show full post »
Gavercronos
Well duhhh. That’s for research. I mean like. Showing a real corpse to medical students. 

Not just show either. Practice too. If a newb slips up on his first surgery and the patient is alive, what do you suppose would happen? 
WillCat

Chautauqua County, New York
Slant Saver [svg] Frank MakerNew York State Route 5 marker

Wanted: GPA dated 5/89 (Red 286?  Black Powerhouse? 508? Early Unleadeds? Canadian things? I'll settle for a propane job at this point) Vintage Sunbeam Mixmaster bowls and accessories, Ruby-cased 10in lamp shade, 7D Mag-lite
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BSAGuy
Well duhhh. That’s for research. I mean like. Showing a real corpse to medical students. 


Yes, Levi.  The bodies aren't just shown, the med students dissect them.  This gives the students hands-on experience with seeing the various muscles, organs, etc. of a real human body.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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REJ2
Well duhhh. That’s for research. I mean like. Showing a real corpse to medical students. 


Twice now you have used duhhh in response to an elder, seems disrespectful and rude at the same time. If these knowledgeable members chose to ignore you then what would you do?  
Bob    ICCC #1574
Never, ever, leave behind a $5 lamp
Perfection Heater Collectors # 7 --- Coleman Slant Saver #63
MilSpecOps Syndicate #016 --- Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0131 --- Coleman Blues 243 #86
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #047 --- Coleman Quick-Lite Crew #23 --- Gold Bond Collector #21
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Leviticus Tomethreus
Ok, ok, I’m sorry. Not trying to be disrespectful or anything.
My friends don’t call me “Lantern/lampie Levi”
for nothin’,if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
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JimL
Actually, Bob makes a very good point.  I didn't think anything of it, but most likely because it wasn't directed at me.  If I got a response like that from someone, they would go on my ignore list.  It's a subtle way of calling someone stupid for not knowing something you felt is obvious.  I don't think you intended this at all, but am just letting you know how that expression is often perceived.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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Gunhippie
What was odd about it was that the medical students, who were supposed to be learning anatomy, didn't do any dissection. Just a couple of undergraduate students in other fields--I was studying botany and entomology--did all the dissection for the day's lab, working late at night as we had classes during the day.

I guess that this made sense, as several classes of med students would study each preparation. Saves on the number of cadavers needed, which were and are always in short supply, compared to if the students were each doing their own dissection. Still, we learned a lot more about anatomy than they ever did!

We also got the majority of the exposure to formalin and formaldehyde. I'd come home reeking of those chemicals and had to change clothes on the front porch before entering the house.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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arizonacamper
Not really a wacky job but my first job I got at age 14 when I walk down the road to a neighbor's house who had a tree service in Lake Tahoe where I grew up. He put me to work from 6 in the morning till 6 at night splitting and stacking firewood. also loading up the truck with firewood for delivery and if the customers wanted the wood stacked by us guess who got to do it.  I was paid $10 an hour cash at the end of the week. I work this job for two summers made great money $10 an hour in 1975 and 1976 was great money. I sure bulked up those two years
Shawn 
Owner of Copper State Diesel And Automotive. See my facebook page.

Lanterns are like tools. 
You can not have too many unless your wife says so!!

Gas is what you use for washing parts diesel is for making power!

Coleman blues 243 #147
Coleman 275 appreciation #74
Milspec syndicate #39

Looking for any lanterns or stoves dated 5/63 or 1/72
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Jeepstircrazy
Start with clearing an old orange grove with dad so seller could sell to developers , Palmetto Fla, orange juice machine cleaner at Tropicana (Bradenton) Welder on top of and inside of water tower, Sarasota) Glass plant laborer (Tropicana again) Cosmotology student, Cosmotologist for 13 years and local back stage crew for Lake Placid concerts (NY), Prison Guard for 4 years till stabbed in neck and hand.....un employed , volunteer Fla. State Parks, Ran hot dog cart (NNY) Auto Parts salesman (Commercial Sales) Cook in Tex/Mex  Fast Food shop, Metal Sculptor of found metal objects, Barber, now unemployed because of covid but signing up for HVAC classes to start next month at 63!!!
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What's the lowest you'll take for this lantern?                                                

          Today is a gift, that's why they call it the present.
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Gunhippie
Thinking back the oddest job ever for me was working in a factory. I worked in two back in my teens--a consequence of being a high-school drop-out. I worked for a few weeks at Ford Industries testing and repairing Code-A-Phones--the first answering machines to become popular in offices. https://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_995222

I then worked two months at Portland Chain making giant log mill conveyor chains.

These were truly miserable jobs, made even worse by the burned-out and hostile co-workers. The mostly female workforce at Ford was just vicious, with frequent back-stabbing being a main passtime. I worked on an assembly line there, and the gals downstream from me would sabotage any tools left on the table during break to slow the line down. We had to buy our own tools on a meager pay, so the second time I forgot to secure everything before lunch and some one cut the cord off my soldering iron, I quit.

The chain gang wasn't so bad, just a hell of a lot more dangerous. Serious injuries were nearly a daily affair, and there were two deaths in those two months. Co-workers loved to pull cute little "pranks", which could easily result in injury or death. Again, we had to buy our own handtools, and any left unattended for an instant were stolen. There were two-story-tall stamping machines that were driven by an overhead shaft. Turning one off just disconnected it from the shaft by loosening the unguarded belt, leaving the machine driven by the massive flywheel. It could take one of these ten minutes to wind down, as there was no brake. It was common for workers to clear a jam in the stamps by reaching in while it was running, as it took so long to shut down and restart. There were many fingers and hands claimed by those!

Ah, the good old days... deregulate, kids, the companies will take care of you!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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D421
Doctor start with dead people for practice. Kind of like learning on a 220 with a rusted fount.
Dominic
Everyone likes the dog catcher...until they catch your dog.
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Leviticus Tomethreus
Well I actually got kinda lucky with my first lantern. It was good old annihilated 228E. Poor thing. I would’ve destroyed a nice lantern.
My friends don’t call me “Lantern/lampie Levi”
for nothin’,if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
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Duck

When I was in the Marines near the end of the Vietnam war my first job was operating an lvtp7. once a yr 2 other crewman and I would be assigned to a force recon platoon where we would be lifeguards for surf indoctrination. This is where they would take every Amphibious tractor crewman out in the ocean in a lvtp7 about a mile open up the top hatches. The crewman would have to jump out fully clothed boots and all and swim to shore. As lifeguards we would paddle out in rubber rafts with the recon squads where we were each assigned a tractor of 26 crewman. When the crewman jumped in we would count heads To make sure they all surfaced if not we had to dive in and bring them up ( this happened more than once). Once they all came up we followed them into shore. 

Later on I transferred to Ordinance Maintenance Battle where I was a crewman on a M51 tank retriever. This is a 60 ton tank tow truck. Our job was to retrieve disabled or stuck heavy vehicles. I’ve pulled many vehicles out of the middle of a swamp in the dead of night . Some would have classified equipment on them so I needed a security clearance.  When I left the marines I got a job at a demolition company. One job we got was demoing a lab at Sperry corporation. They built some of the electronic equipment used by the military. Some were classified. Well they everyone in our crew needed to have a background check... when we got to Sperry everyone needed to be escorted to and from the work site and to the bathrooms except me, I was free to go by myself  pissed some of my coworkers off but also gave me more respect.

Joe
Mil-SpecOps #0219
Stovie and Damn proud of it


how long does one have to be dead before it’s considered archeology  and not grave robbery?


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Sandman
Gunhippie wrote:
They weren't models.
My older brother went thru mortician school at Wayne State University  in Detroit......there was people that donated themselves to the program but the vast majority of bodies were unclaimed bodies from the city of Detroit 

ICCC  #1869
Coleman Quick-lite crew #25
Coleman Blues 243 #158
Coleman 275 appreciation #0232

 

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Duck
Now when I was a little younger Then Levi my best friends Father owned a sand and gravel company. Frank and I would go to work with him on Saturdays. My job was to grease the screening plant then walk on the conveyer while the plant was running. Sometimes a big rock would get stuck in the hopper door and stop material from going though I would push down on the counter weight for the door letting the rock through then try and throw the rock off the belt. Sometimes the rock was heavy enough it would take me all the way to the top and almost to the screens before I got it off the belt. Then I would have to run down the belt back to the hopper. I made $10 a day 

Joe
Mil-SpecOps #0219
Stovie and Damn proud of it


how long does one have to be dead before it’s considered archeology  and not grave robbery?


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arizonacamper
Joe I don't care what anybody says that would be a fun job even today!
Shawn 
Owner of Copper State Diesel And Automotive. See my facebook page.

Lanterns are like tools. 
You can not have too many unless your wife says so!!

Gas is what you use for washing parts diesel is for making power!

Coleman blues 243 #147
Coleman 275 appreciation #74
Milspec syndicate #39

Looking for any lanterns or stoves dated 5/63 or 1/72
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Sandman
The refinery my Dad worked at had a 12 week work program for their sons .......cleaning storage tanks......cut a opening in the side of a tank with a pneumatic sawzall, go inside with aluminum & brass shovels & wheel barrows and clean out waxy crude oil wearing fresh air equipment .....the fresh air equipment used for yrs before being outlawed was a hand cranked box sitting outside tank in the dike area feeding air to guys inside hooked to masks......someone outside got the bright idea of hanging their rear end over intake and let a toot get sucked in.......it paid super good money back then.....probly more than a lot of people make today but it was a long a 12 weeks.

ICCC  #1869
Coleman Quick-lite crew #25
Coleman Blues 243 #158
Coleman 275 appreciation #0232

 

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Duck
Joe I don't care what anybody says that would be a fun job even today!
Shawn 

Pretty sure MShA would have a lot to say about it today. i miss those days, lot of fond memories. The pit was next to the local dump and back then you could dump old cars and engines etc.  we fond an old corvair that ran and we use to drive it all over the pit. At lunch we’d take a loader and try and squish rats with the bucket.  

Joe
Mil-SpecOps #0219
Stovie and Damn proud of it


how long does one have to be dead before it’s considered archeology  and not grave robbery?


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Billdog37
Somebody has to do it. Worked just fine. IMG_9108.jpg 
Bill
ICCC# 1225
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austin65uri
"When I was in the Marines near the end of the Vietnam war my first job was operating an lvtp7." Quote from Duck.
Still hazardous today. A  Marine AAV-P7/A1 sank late last month off Camp Pendleton with the loss of 8 Marines and 1 Navy Corpsman.  Semper Fi.
Bill.
ICCC#1601
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Duck
austin65uri wrote:
"When I was in the Marines near the end of the Vietnam war my first job was operating an lvtp7." Quote from Duck.
Still hazardous today. A  Marine AAV-P7/A1 sank late last month off Camp Pendleton with the loss of 8 Marines and 1 Navy Corpsman.  Semper Fi.
I know and I am going through all the scenarios to try and figure out how 8 could get out but the other 8 couldn’t. I can’t figure out what went wrong that it sank that quick. Only thing I could think of is the back door wasn’t secured properly. Wonder if they’ll ever release the cause. It’s a shame but that’s why we had surf indoctrination ever year, because these things obviously happen.

Joe
Mil-SpecOps #0219
Stovie and Damn proud of it


how long does one have to be dead before it’s considered archeology  and not grave robbery?


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LakeGeorge
37 years in the salt mine. I'll be retiring in a year or two, God willing.
Gary Coleman, I am.
I.C.C.C. #1035
 Gettysburg Camping Trip, June 9-14, 2020, at Artillery Ridge Campground resulted in zero cases of Coronavirus being spread! Masks work!
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BrianBo
Nothin dangerous or dirty, but I worked the Christmas rush at a Radio Shack in the ‘80s.
We sold computers on hand written receipts. We had a cash drawer, tax table taped to the counter and a carbon paper credit card reader. Even then I thought it odd the WE didn’t use the computers that we sold🤔
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curtludwig

Funny you should mention Radio Shack. I recently listened to a couple of podcasts about the TRS-80. They mention how Tandy Corp (which owned Radio Shack) didn't think the TRS-80 would sell so they only made enough (like 3500?) to put one in each store figuring that if they didn't sell they could at least use it in the store. They sold out on like the third day and had stacks of orders they couldn't fill. Pretty interesting story from the golden age of computing.
I thought I had a line on a TRS-80 Model III the other day but the seller wanted absurd money for a basement kept dirty machine. They claim somebody paid them but I have doubts.

Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
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Jayhawksr
Well duhhh. That’s for research. I mean like. Showing a real corpse to medical students. 
The class is called Gross Anatomy.  First year med students dissect corpse to learn about the human body.
Richard (KC native and KU Alumni living in Maryland)
Rock Chalk, Jayhawk. Go KU!
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1983.  Coleman Quick-lite Crew #36.
Mil Spec Syndicate #1983
Eagle Scout Class of '83
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BrianBo
My buddy went to physical therapy school. He said that by the time the corpses made it down to them, the med school students had picked them over. Not much left for them🤢
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macwacs
Not me but a Great Uncle that went to medical school in Canada at the beginning of the last century. His job was to boil bodies to remove the flesh then reassemble and wire the skeleton back together for the medical class. My Grandmother came home one day to find a pot simmering on the stove. Upon lifting the lid she discovered a human arm boiling in the pot.
 RMW
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StanDahl
curtludwig wrote:

Funny you should mention Radio Shack. I recently listened to a couple of podcasts about the TRS-80. 

I took a computer class in high school (1979-80) and we used TRS-80's. It had a cassette tape storage drive that didn't work for beans and I spent each period retyping my code all over again for the blackjack game I was trying to make. I hated that thing. 

I once worked in a lab in La Jolla California. Beautiful setting, a block from the beach. Lunch out on the bluffs was great. Inside? Full of rats, mice and rabbits. They were testing an allergy medication. I had a degree in Bio and the lab techs were undergrads, but they had the clean jobs and I was just a lowly maintenance droid, which meant I was basically a cage cleaner, hosing out racks of rodent cages and putting them into the walk-in autoclave for sterilization. When I did get help, and if I wasn't paying attention, I might end up with some other knucklehead hosing through a block of cages with me on the receiving end of a blast of rodent waste. I hated that job, but at least I didn't have to sit in front of a TRS-80 all day. 

ICCC Petty Bureaucrat #CMLXII...
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Recoil
I blow up buildings....but believe it or not, thats only my part time job!  We just did the largest job in Canadian history last year....if interested the link is a 15 min documentary style video linked below.   We are only the subcontractors that do the explosives and in the video the main contractor kind of makes it sound like they do it!  Haha....you pay for the video, you can say whatever you want.

Searching for a 8 72 lantern and/or 2 68.....
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Gunhippie
You get to blow things up AND get paid for it!

That was fifteen minutes well spent--Thanks!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Recoil
Gunhippie wrote:
You get to blow things up AND get paid for it!

That was fifteen minutes well spent--Thanks!


Ya it is a really fun pass time and interesting work.   On that job I had hired my son as a general laborer for us but he ended up placing powder like the rest of us.  Pretty cool gig for a 19 year old!
Searching for a 8 72 lantern and/or 2 68.....
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BSAGuy
Very cool, Recoil.  How did you learn that trade?  Military?  Somewhere else?
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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Recoil
In the military, I was a signaller.  I worked in range control in 1993 and the cdn military was so horribly under staffed that one day the range clearance guy asked my boss if I could help him as he had no one else.  I was a wide-eyed private and was excited to do ANYTHING other than man the range control radio.  So for a week, me and that one guy cleared ranges; counter charging unexploded ordanance.  By the end I was handling the c4 but very little of that translated into actual training.   What it did do, however, was instill a lifelong fascination with explosives.  When I was hired into law enforcement, I applied and was accepted onto a bomb squad and have worked as such ever since.  Thats where I received the bulk of my experience.  The building stuff has just been OJT.  I am fortunate to have 2 very very experienced mentors to answer my silly questions.
Searching for a 8 72 lantern and/or 2 68.....
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TunkTop
I don’t know if it would be considered wacky, but for 38 years I refueled nuclear submarines. Very exacting work, but also extremely interesting.
E.B. Leland
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Leviticus Tomethreus
It sounds extremely scary
My friends don’t call me “Lantern/lampie Levi”
for nothin’,if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
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Sandman
My job at the State transportation  dept was in the statewide bridge section......inspection & maintenance......we responded to all bridge emergencies.......one time a propane truck went off a bridge and landed on RR below......what a mess, truck driver was killed unfortunately.....we got in there as soon as fire was out looking things over......i happened to look over at a female state trooper as she was kinda nudging with her foot, this black sooty thing about the size of sofa cushion ...she didnt know it was the truck drivers upper torso......dont miss those days

ICCC  #1869
Coleman Quick-lite crew #25
Coleman Blues 243 #158
Coleman 275 appreciation #0232

 

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Recoil
TunkTop wrote:
I don’t know if it would be considered wacky, but for 38 years I refueled nuclear submarines. Very exacting work, but also extremely interesting.


Pretty wacky.
Searching for a 8 72 lantern and/or 2 68.....
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brucesheehe
When in college, I had a job as a janitor in an adult novelty/book store in Pittsburgh.

My job was mopping out the viewing booths with Janitor In A Drum.

It was a bit surprising, that I saw some of the faculty of the school in the establishment.

I quickly found a new job as a bartender and short order cook.
Bruce Sheehe
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
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Mister Wilson
Uugghh, Bruce wins 😜
John
H.C. Lanterns dealer
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #2001 A Turd's Odyssey
Canadian Blues #028
Coleman Slant Saver #31
Looking for 6-56 and 6-58 Birthday lanterns.
There's been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about.
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Frank6160
Was a phone tech 38 years. Nothing od in itself but i did see some odd things. Serviced the system at a large funeral home /cemetery.  One of the equipment rooms was accessed through a room where the bodies were laid out before preparing.  In the room with equipment they stored caskets for babies and children. Also watched part of an embalming. Young fellow with his boom box on counter rocking out doing his job. Not a pretty site especially when it's an approximately 85-90 year old little lady....
Frank
If It's Coleman
ICCC #793
275 Appreciation Syndicate #60
The Coleman Blues 243's #44
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Leviticus Tomethreus
brucesheehe wrote:
When in college, I had a job as a janitor in an adult novelty/book store in Pittsburgh.

My job was mopping out the viewing booths with Janitor In A Drum.

It was a bit surprising, that I saw some of the faculty of the school in the establishment.

I quickly found a new job as a bartender and short order cook.


Haha😂
My friends don’t call me “Lantern/lampie Levi”
for nothin’,if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
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ibutler
My friend is a doc. In anatomy class you are paired up with a lab partner and assigned a cadaver. They are treated with a preservative and you work on dissecting them for the entire semester. At the end of the semester a memorial service is held to honor and thank the donor for contributing to science and the student's education. Students are expected to attend. 
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brucesheehe
Been there and seen that ritual.

Our cadaver had cotton sewn into the skin of his face - to hide the identity of the donor.
Bruce Sheehe
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
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Sandman
My older brother is a mortician/funeral director, many years ago he was the only person certified for corneal tissue removal on body donations in our county, he performed a couple of them before moving out of the county......guess in his occupation its just another task

ICCC  #1869
Coleman Quick-lite crew #25
Coleman Blues 243 #158
Coleman 275 appreciation #0232

 

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