200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
Gunhippie
We purchased a depalletizer for our empty bottles a couple of years ago. Other than coming without any firmware or software, and with no other parameters set for things that need them, it worked quite well after I spent a week or two on it.

But the guy who ordered it--not me--had it specially made to fit a pallet of five layers of bottles, which would ave been fine if it weren't for the fact that our bottles come in pallets of six layers. This meant that the bottlers had to unload the first layer by hand, which made them surly.

Not liking surly bottlers, I finally found almost enough time to allow me to lift it up to take six layers.

Here's the story so far:

[48718962013_03923f6991_b]

That's the machine before lifting. We've already removed the side panels and the rear doors.

I added 7 3/4" to everything. This is one of the side panels:

[48719297591_ff1343bedb_b]

[48719297421_faac573cac_b]

Add a coat of primer and some Rusto Safety Red:

[48718961903_266a5e987e_b]

Door frames all lifted and painted:

[48718962148_e24dc5c478_b]

They'll get some panels later.

While I'm working on that stuff, Mark is replacing the cables that lift the pallets:

[48719467622_cf725a0218_b]

Me, making sparks:

[48719467572_bf4f71a996_b][48719297511_3333bdaaa8_b]

I pre-fabbed the sub-assemblies to make things faster.

Leg extensions added:

[48719467482_c571fcd110_b]

Making more sparks:

[48718961918_af31a62779_b]

About every ten minutes, my helmet fogs up. The only way I've found to fix it:

[48718961978_eb37cd207e_b]

I think I'm done welding!

[48719297476_3d1d8f788f_b]

I also added some 45 degree braces on the leg extensions. Should be stout as hell.

Tomorrow: Get it all back together and in place and tuned up. Should be fun. We'll be bottling Monday, so no rush or anything.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Mister Wilson
I work with surly bottlers every night! ðŸ˜‚  Our depalletizer takes 9 layer pallets, 4050 bottles per pallet.  It's a wicked sound when something goes wrong and 2 or 3 layers come crashing down.  It doesn't happen often, but when it does, you know it.
Looks like you're doing a good job on yours, hope it performs well out of the gate.
John
H.C. Lanterns dealer
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #2001 A Turd's Odyssey
Canadian Blues #028
Coleman Slant Saver #31
Looking for 6-56 and 6-58 Birthday lanterns.
There's been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about.
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Chucker
THAT, is a days work if I've ever seen it.

Better you doing that welding and not me Timm. Oh, I'm not afraid of it, it's afraid of me!

I leave many bird poop welds. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Gunhippie
John: Forgot you work in the business, too!

I wish we could do a nine-layer depal, but everything here is shoe-horned into place. Look at how much room they gave me to work on this machine.

What drives me nuts about most of this new equipment is two things:

One, we get factory-floor prototypes. They claim they've tested them, but little things like THERE'S NO FIRMWARE INSTALLED tells me otherwise. I had to make this machine work. At least it isn't a passenger plane!

Two: Computers where there is no need for a damned computer. I drew up a schematic using, IIRC, six relays and a couple of delay timers that would do everything a depal needs to do. It's just limit switches--no comparisons, no need for a computer. Kids these days....

Chuck: Take a look at the welder I'm using. It belongs in a Miller museum. I think my original boss bought that at Boeing Surplus when he was helping build Pike  Place brewery--twenty-odd years ago, and it was already used. Add to that my minimal training in welding, and, well, my welds ain't purty. They'll do the job, though.

Tomorrow: Grinding, painting, and then get it in place so I can spend the weekend getting it tuned.

If I'm really lucky and fast, I'll get out Sunday to hunt Chanterelles and King Boletes.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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GCinSC
Gunhippie,

I know what to do with a good beer but what is a depalletizer? 

Gary
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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Whitegas Extraordinaire
I work with surly bottlers every night! Ã°Å¸Ëœâ€š  Our depalletizer takes 9 layer pallets, 4050 bottles per pallet.  It's a wicked sound when something goes wrong and 2 or 3 layers come crashing down.  It doesn't happen often, but when it does, you know it.
Looks like you're doing a good job on yours, hope it performs well out of the gate.


I used to re-plumb hydraulic palletizers years ago as a side job for AB. The sheer horror of someone throwing away a full pallet of full beer bottles, do to the loss of a couple of levels was more than I could bear.

WGE
I frighten easily!
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Gunhippie
GCinSC wrote:
Gunhippie,

I know what to do with a good beer but what is a depalletizer? 

Gary


The depal takes a full pallet of empty bottles--or will when I finish--and strips one layer at a time off to feed onto the conveyor belt that takes the bottles to the labeler. From there, they go to the bottling machine, which rinses, evacuates, fills and then caps the bottles. At this point, we hand-load them into cases so we can sell the bottled beer to you. We run at around 3,000 bottles per hour, so hand-loading the line wasn't working well.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Gunhippie


I used to re-plumb hydraulic palletizers years ago as a side job for AB. The sheer horror of someone throwing away a full pallet of full beer bottles, do to the loss of a couple of levels was more than I could bear.

WGE


You're talking about a palletizer, which puts the full bottles onto a pallet. What I'm working on is the other end of the line, where the empty bottles begin their journey through the bottling line.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Rhubarb
A grinder and some paint...
Andy in NV ICCC #1253 
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Gunhippie
Rhubarb wrote:
A grinder and some paint...


... makes a welder what he ain't!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Gunhippie
Here are some pics of the depal and bottling line in action:

[48722214003_30a8f2f905_b][48722218468_bd8d7bf0ed_b][48722222743_acd099837e_b]

Those were taken with an ultra-wide angle (10mm) lens. Our facility is barely big enough to fit this equipment.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
GCinSC
Gunhippie wrote:


The depal takes a full pallet of empty bottles--or will when I finish--and strips one layer at a time off to feed onto the conveyor belt that takes the bottles to the labeler. From there, they go to the bottling machine, which rinses, evacuates, fills and then caps the bottles. At this point, we hand-load them into cases so we can sell the bottled beer to you. We run at around 3,000 bottles per hour, so hand-loading the line wasn't working well.


For those of us that are only familiar with how to dispose of an empty this MIGHT be close to what Gunhippie is working with. Man can that spoil your day of a row of glass takes a crackling dump. I searched based on name on machine from first pic.

Might need a tour and QC uniform to really learn this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=Wk8j7boXbL8

I'm not in a craft brew hot spot but just found out we have one taking a chance on our community opening next year hopefully.

Stay thirsty my friends.
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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Gunhippie
Yep. That's a very similar machine to ours--except it actually works on the factory floor. I wish I had that sweet accumulator table!

I'm glad to hear of a micro opening up in a beer desert. Too many all flock to the same popular places--based on population, sales of craft beer, and water quality. I think Bend, OR has over 35 craft/micro breweries, Portland more than 50, and no one can count the number in Seattle. Start-ups in these places tend to be real flashes-in-the-pan, as the competition is fierce in such markets and it's hard to distinguish yourself the other five places on the block.

More power to those willing to go out in the wilderness and do some pioneering!

Let's hope your new local makes a go of it. The two hardest things for many start-ups is the change from brewing a 1/2 barrel or so in your home brewery to turning out repeatable batches of many barrels in an industrial setting, and just not taking the business seriously. Lots of amateurs, few pros.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Gunhippie
Progress: Welding, grinding and painting done!

[48722636403_98f498501c_b][48723146417_7b5d7404ab_b]

The Rusto Safety Red isn't a perfect match for the original powder-coat, but it's good enough for Government work!

After lunch the real work will start: Getting it back into place, arranging railings, etc, and making sure it works for next week's bottling run.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
GCinSC
Gunhippie,

I enjoy a well made beer from a certain range and that taste likely came from a tasting presented by the then Chief of the Great Lakes Brewing Co. https://www.greatlakesbrewing.com/beers Cleveland OH. It was a civic group that for their "information" hosted a tasting. He started with their Dortmunder and BBQ chips, a great start and confirmed that I had been doing it half right for years. The final tasting was the Edmund Fitzgerald porter with an iced chocolate brownie. We looked at each other at the table and shrugged shoulders. Well, he wasn't the head man at GLBC for no reason. That left a memory. My favorites from GLB which I cannot get in SC are the Burning River Pale Ale and Commodore Perry IPA. And for a person from the great Lakes area all of those names are tied to people and an event from those lakes.

It's like the difference between Grandma's chocolate cake and a Twinkie from a vending machine.

The stuff in the fridge is Yuengling lately. 

Gary
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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MrAlexxx
Nice job Timm. I must say though I sure do enjoy reading about work much more than I remember having to do it.  lol  🙂


Alex
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Rhubarb
Timmmm, the last time I checked, NV and OR aren't too far away... Why can't I find your beer? Thanks! 
Andy in NV ICCC #1253 
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Gunhippie
I'll just see to that.... We share a long border, after all!

I have no idea what hoops we need to jump through to sell our beer in Nevada, but I'll talk to the marketing folks to see what we can do. An unsatisfied customer in the middle of nowhere... this cannot be.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Gunhippie
MrAlexxx wrote:
Nice job Timm. I must say though I sure do enjoy reading about work much more than I remember having to do it.  lol 
Alex


I just wish.... Maybe when my fairy godmother dies and leaves me the secrets to the kingdom.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
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