200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Ross226
I'm new to the wonderful world of Coleman and am just finishing a clean up of a 1966 421 stove.  It was in sad shape - dirty, lots of rust, completely inoperative.  With advice I found here and at Old Coleman Parts, I got her apart and cleaned up.  It is not intended to be 'collector quality' just a little stove I can cook and perk coffee on.

Since the pictures below I have purchase VHT aluminum paint (2000 F) and intend to do the burner bowl and cap.  I am also going to paint the fount.  But what do you do about the grill?  Will the VHT aluminum paint hold up, or should I just steel wool all the rust off?

Thanks!

421 Before.jpg      
Stove small.jpg 
Stove (sm).jpg
Ross
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fuel brained
I have restored a few stoves. 0000 steel wool works good. If it is going to be a user just clean off the heavy stuff. 
God bless. Pastor Jeff
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Pastor Jeff
God said "Let there be light" so He let His Son shine.
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Aspbear
It looks great. I would not paint the burners just clean them up, let them soak in vinegar and then use steel wool. The grate I would use a wire wheel in a drill with it held in a vise just to get the rust and general clean up. The tank I would strip and repaint and then give it a coat of high temp clear coat.

Nice job on the clean up.
G.B. Harp
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MotorcycleDan
Also agree in not painting the burner bowls and caps. The paint will not hold up. I have used it on the grates and it does OK there. Yours looks clean as it is. The light rust just shows the age of the stove. Mine were solid thick rust and that is the only reason I painted them. Agree with G B on the tank. Strip, paint and put a coat of clear coat on and you are good to go!

Have fun. 
Dan ICCC #900
ICCC Treasure
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staylit
Another agreement with the last two comments!! I'd just clean the bowls and caps, even VHT paint will not hold up. A good wire brush or steel wool on the grate, paint the tank and I would call it good.
Looks great so far!!

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Chucker
Like Dan says the VHT flame proof paint will hold up on the burner grate however not where pans or griddles come in contact with it. Most Coleman grates were painted silver from the factory.
I paint the manifold tube between burners and drip pans with high temp silver. 

I've had good success with painting the burner bowl but not the caps. They just seem to flake eventually.

I also have stoves that only get light oil on the grate every year before packing them up. 

Whatever suits your tastes. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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nomis1
You did a great job cleaning it up. As most have said, just clean up the grate with steel wool. I think it looks more natural that way. Those a great little compact stove and I like the removable grate they have too. A lot easier to maintain/clean in the future.

Simon
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Gunhippie
I used VHT Aluminum on the grate of my 426A. Two years later, it still sticks to the bottom of pots and pans, and leaves silver streaks on them. It seems the VHT gets soft at those temps.

Ditto what others wrote about the burners. A good gun blue or black, preferably the hot blue, will work much better.

The grill is upside-down in your second picture.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
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Ross226
Okay, thanks for the sound advice!  I was all set to paint the burners tomorrow and contemplating painting the grill.

Ross
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ke4ljh
Excellent comments from everyone.

Don't forget to manufacture completely un-nessecary excuses to use that stove every week.

I have one set up on the screened in back porch. That way it is always set up and ready to go at a moments notice when I feel like using it.

Think of it as a system.

Stephen - Florida
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ke4ljh
Paint the Bunsen, Manifold and Drip Tray with the VHT Flame Proof paint. But make sure you properly clean those parts very well with denatured alcohol before painting them. The paint will hold on those parts and keep them looking nice.

As far as the burners are concerned. I coat the burners with cooking oil and then light them up. I season the burner rings just like cast iron. Seasoning with oil and heat or using gun bluing agents perform the same task, they are both rust inhibitors but neither will stop rust. I choose cooking oil and heat as that's one less thing to buy. And they still look blued.

Stephen - Florida
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Ross226
ke4ljh wrote:
Paint the Bunsen, Manifold and Drip Tray with the VHT Flame Proof paint. But make sure you properly clean those parts very well with denatured alcohol before painting them. The paint will hold on those parts and keep them looking nice.

As far as the burners are concerned. I coat the burners with cooking oil and then light them up. I season the burner rings just like cast iron. Seasoning with oil and heat or using gun bluing agents perform the same task, they are both rust inhibitors but neither will stop rust. I choose cooking oil and heat as that's one less thing to buy. And they still look blued.


I really like the idea of seasoning with oil like cast iron - and I expect it will create a classic look appropriate to a 50 year old stove.  That is the way I'm going to go.  The only bluing I have is cold bluing paste and judging my the way it has held up (or rather, not held up) on my S&W Model 13 heavy barrel it's not an option.  😉
Ross
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Eel
ke4ljh wrote:
...using gun bluing agents perform the same task, they are both rust inhibitors but neither will stop rust. I choose cooking oil and heat as that's one less thing to buy. And they still look blued.


Personally, I hates VHT splashed all over the place.  This is a personal problem only.

I would not never ever nohow use bluing, as there's some pretty special chemistry in there that I don't want anywhere NEAR my food.  I'm not a fan of eating heavy metals.

EEL Eclectic Lanterns, div.  Doofenshmirtz-EEL Incorporated.

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ke4ljh
The oil and heat method will work just fine, just like cast iron, burner bowls and caps should be oiled most every time they are used.

Vegetable oil, bacon grease, butter, left over cooking grease from hamburgers or what ever is available at that time, usually what's left in the skillet when your done cooking.

Or, what you are about to use. Then one can use their finger to apply the coating and then the heat.

Should you have a brand new generator or one that has just been de-rusted, do the same thing with the generator.

Stephen - Florida
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Eel
Ross226 wrote:
...The only bluing I have is cold bluing paste... 


You are putting a coating on hot metal under food.  You might want to consider what chemicals are in that bluing paste, and whether you want (for example) hexavalent chromium or cadmium in your bacon.

Some of these choices can potentially be quite bad for your health.

EEL Eclectic Lanterns, div.  Doofenshmirtz-EEL Incorporated.

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Ross226
Great advice here!

Cooking oil/heat seasoning is clearly the way to go on the burner cups and caps, and the grill is just going to be cleaned up with steel wool.

Glad I started the thread because after this stove I have a 431 G (1974) and a 411 (1965) waiting to get on the bench.

Thanks to all for the input!


Ross
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