200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

stuntcardriver
I have a 425E 9-1967 that even after I turn the valve completely off still will leak fuel.  What am I missing with this?  I had it all apart cleaned it up and everything looked fine.
charlie
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JimL
Leaking from the tip? If so, did you tighten down the valve nut a little more?

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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toddcline
Could be a damaged valve seat/valve needle.  If nothing else works, try taking out the valve stem and inspect the end of the stem, and look at the seat. If the end of the stem has a groove worn into it, I've fixed this before by chucking it into a drill, and using 400 grit to start, then 1200 grit to finish putting a fresh point on the stem. MAKE SURE YOU DON'T PUT THE JAWS OF THE DRILL CHUCK ON THE STEM AREA THAT WILL BE INSIDE THE PACKING GLAND.  Use wet/dry paper for this, and keep it wet!  After that, use "Mothers Mag Polish" to clean and polish the rest of the valve stem while in the drill. You will probably need to replace the packing gland after all this, I'd go into detail here, but you can find all that in the OCP tech tutorials. 

Todd 
What we're dealing with here is a complete lack of respect for the law........____ Todd Cline ICCC # 1296 Battle Creek, MI. ______

Mil.Spec. GP. # 73rd. Trans. Ft. Eustis Va. 1984-1987      NCO club: 1900-2200, usually.
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stuntcardriver
Yes it leaks from the tip even after I shut it down.  I opened it up today and noticed a puddle of raw fuel in the stove from the tip.  I will try to tightening the packing nut down.
charlie
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JimL
Let me back track. I don't think this is a valve packing issue. Follow Todd's advice.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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stuntcardriver
Got it, I will try this tomorrow.  
charlie
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JimDouglasJr
Packing only seals the valve stem, not fuel routed into the generator.
Kyle. Kaptain Kamplite - America's Finest Lantern Fettler.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate and 243 Blues Member #0031 &  J.C. Higgins aficionado.
“If you light a lamp for someone else, it will also brighten your path.” Buddhist quote.  Brand-X Super Hoarder.
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JimL
JimDouglasJr wrote:
Packing only seals the valve stem, not fuel routed into the generator.


Right. I realized the error of my ways after posting, hence the retraction.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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stuntcardriver
Okay so I pulled the valve stem.  What should I see?  I don't see a line or groove worn into it.  When I checked the stove this morning again there was fuel leaking from the generator tip.


DSCN1447.JPG 



DSCN1449.JPG 
charlie
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Gand28
Charlie, check the other end of the generator.  The needle needs to seat well into the hole in the tip.  If carbon or debris buildup is stopping the needle from completely filling the tip, you won't get full shut off.

Edit:  And make sure that the needle is fully screwed into the end of the valve.
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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WYSIWYG
Stoves leaking fuel at the tip is always something wrong with the  the valve. 

Either it is not closing all the way, or the seat and face is not mating correctly.

Look again at the part you have out, for a grove or damgae in this area

2408417.jpeg 

also inspect the seat in the valve where the valve must seal, look for a nick or debris, or other damage.  I'm pretty sure I see a grove in this picture.

If it's not shuting off the fuel there, it will leak.

You may want to put it together with out the "needle" and make sure it is seating.  I suppose you could have some sort of mechanical interferance problem keeping you from closing the valve completly. Although I doubt that can happen.
John        
One in every public place...

ICCC #1338    IDITOS  #2654
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0059
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #004
Member of CCF  Chromostereopsis  Club
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JimDouglasJr
Yup, being overtightened at some point can do that.
Kyle. Kaptain Kamplite - America's Finest Lantern Fettler.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate and 243 Blues Member #0031 &  J.C. Higgins aficionado.
“If you light a lamp for someone else, it will also brighten your path.” Buddhist quote.  Brand-X Super Hoarder.
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Deanofid
The picture is not that big and I can still easily see a groove in the end of the valve stem.
That needs to be cleaned up, or replaced.  Do what Todd said for a start.  That will likely
take care of your problem.  Good luck.
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
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stuntcardriver
Thanks guys never having a stove apart before I wasn't sure exactly what I was looking for.  I did put the valve in the drill press and used some sand paper to make everything super smooth.  I might take apart a working stove valve to see the difference.  
charlie
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WYSIWYG
I wonder if we see this more with stoves because they have such big generators and the flame lingers so long after the valve is shut off. 

The camp cook gets impatient waiting for the flame to go out and cranks down on the valve harder and harder.


John        
One in every public place...

ICCC #1338    IDITOS  #2654
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0059
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #004
Member of CCF  Chromostereopsis  Club
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Kansas John
[nothingtoadd]


I have a beautiful 426nl tank with this same problem.  Adding to this thread so I can find it easier.  I'm going to attempt to thread the stem into the valve without the generator or valve packing and try pressurizing the tank to see where it is leaking.  The generator is not an original one for this model stove.

426tank.jpg 
John M. Lawrence, KS
ICCC #1431

Looking for a 214 kero and REI single burner anniversary stove as well as any Coleman born on date 10/77, 1/80
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Gunhippie
A groove in the tip of the valve stem doesn't have to be large to cause this problem. I often have to use a 10X loupe to see a groove in a leaky valve stem. If it's visible in that little picture, it's bad. I'd expect the seat of the valve to be similarly damaged. You may find it easier to simply replace the valve assembly.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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mikew
Kansas John wrote:
[nothingtoadd]


I have a beautiful 426nl tank with this same problem.  Adding to this thread so I can find it easier.  I'm going to attempt to thread the stem into the valve without the generator or valve packing and try pressurizing the tank to see where it is leaking.  The generator is not an original one for this model stove.

426tank.jpg 


I don't think you will be able to pressurize the fount without the valve packing.  The packing provides a seal to keep fuel from leaking by way of the stem out the packing nutl.  It is still under pressure from the fount even when the valve is shut.
Mike
"... at evening time, it shall be light." Zechariah 14:7

Slant Saver #05 Milspec Ops 0045
Quicklite Crew #27
Perfection Heater Collectors #4
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Majicwrench
I just did my 417B a week ago. Would take 10 minutes sometimes to shut off, just a flicker of a flame.  Clean up the face on the valve, all it takes is a tiny imperfection.  I chucked in  a drill press then dressed seat with a knife hone, now works like a champ.
Keith
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outlawmws
here is the pic blown up and its clear as Dean said , its grooved...  

this is the surface you need to "dress"

valve tip1.jpg
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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Kansas John
mikew wrote:


I don't think you will be able to pressurize the fount without the valve packing.  The packing provides a seal to keep fuel from leaking by way of the stem out the packing nutl.  It is still under pressure from the fount even when the valve is shut.



You were correct. I think there must have been some gunk or debris between the point and seat on mine. When I reassembled the valve minus the generator (after trying it without the packing nut) everything sealed up great. I ran the stove for about 30 minutes with no issues.
John M. Lawrence, KS
ICCC #1431

Looking for a 214 kero and REI single burner anniversary stove as well as any Coleman born on date 10/77, 1/80
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TJJulick
Also with it being a 1968, it wouldn't hurt to stretch th spring on the f/a tube rod. The tip may not have ample pressure against the concave end of the stem.
Just food for thought.
Sincerely,
Sincerely,
T.J.
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GrayClay
An important point about this discussion: The valve thread has 2 'starter threads'. As the valve is closed over many years, it will take a seat, forming a groove on the valve face. If you remove the valve for repairs, and then replace it, if you happen to rotate the valve 180 degrees from the original position, now that groove in the valve face will not fit into the same worn spot: ie: it will be prone to leaking now. Remove the valve and replace 180 deg on the other start thread, it will usually solve the leaking problem. 
Also, as mentioned above, grinding and polishing out the groove will solve the leaking problem as well.

Clay. Sierra Foothills, California
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VincentMechanic31
Man am I glad this thread got revived in the last few days.

Been reading it and lo and behold today I had this exact problem.

A 413F I am fixing up for a friend failed the dunk test at the valve. Packing looked good. Looked and found a gouge on the valve stem. Almost exactly where Outlaw's arrow is pointing.

Luckily there is a stack of suitcase stoves in the corner over yonder. Scavenged a valve stem from a donor stove and problem solved.

Thank you!!!
"We are here on earth to fart around, and don't let anyone tell you any different" -Kurt Vonnegut 

- VincentMechanic31 (Vince) 
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plugger
I bought my 425F sometime around 1986.  Used it only three or four times.
Stored it for 20+ years.
I suspect I over-tightened the fuel valve.  Also, it could be that the sustained pressure on the conical plug let the seat gouge the plug.
I wish Coleman would strongly emphasize not to over-tighten the valve.
Also, I think it's good to loosen the filler cap when the stove is not in use for a long time, to depressurize, thereby reducing the likelihood of fuel leaking past a valve that might not be tightened enough.
I'm going to try unscrewing the needle stem and twirling the plug in the drill press to grind it smooth.
Anyhow, here's what the plug looks like now:
GougeInValve-1-Arrow - Reduced.jpg
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plugger
Grinding the bevel smooth in the drill press worked!
I held a sharpening stone against it, gently, guessing the angle, and eyeballing the surface.
It took about 20 minutes, with several interruptions to check progress.
The result isn't that nice straight cone from the manufacturer, but it's good enough.
I couldn't see the configuration of the seat, but it appears to have an edge that presses into the plug.
I doubt it is a flat surface that matches the conical plug, because my reshaped plug is no longer straight-sided.
Many, many huge thanks to everyone for advice, and especially to toddcline for the drill turning idea!
(Sorry.  I forgot to take a picture before reassembling, and I'm afraid to disassemble again.)
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Flapjack
I know this is an old thread but I have a 424 stove and just replaced the graphite bushing on the valve stem.  Upon reassembly the stove would not shut off completely.  I wanted to try the easiest solution first so I followed GrayClay's advice and reinstalled the valve 180 degrees to the other set of starter threads.  Works perfect now. 
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GrayClay
Glad you found that tip Rich! Like you, I also found this obscure fact by searching the posts here.  It explains my experience of servicing a leak tight stove ...only to have it start leaking at the valve seat!😏 Now I put a tiny scribe mark on the top of the stem right near the wheel.
Clay. Sierra Foothills, California
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dbhost
How does this come apart?
Love my old school Coleman liquid fuel gear. Looking for tips and tricks to make the most of it.

-Dave
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outlawmws
Which "this"?
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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dbhost
outlawmws wrote:
Which "this"?


I have no idea how to answer your question. If I knew the name of the part I would use it. The cone thing that that the rod screws into, This thing, that the arrow is pointed to the groove in...
[image] 

Now looking at the other photos, and I just want to check myself here, it looks like we unscrew the packing nut, and back this all the way using the knob and it should draw out of the tube....  I am then assuming that I take the knob off, slide the packing nut and packing out, and unscrew the rod with the needle. Wrap the top of this with some sort of protective tape to keep the drill press chuck jaws from damaging it, chuck it up, and set the drill press fairly low speed, and get after it with some sandpaper to restore the bevel.
Love my old school Coleman liquid fuel gear. Looking for tips and tricks to make the most of it.

-Dave
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Chucker
Is yours like post #25 above?
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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zoomkat
"and unscrew the rod with the needle"

From reading here, it seems that it is fairly common for the rod to snap off, causing a non recoverable situation.
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Majicwrench
I have never had rod snap off. Knock on wood.

Just cleaned up a Wedge stove valve tip a couple days ago. Works like new.
Keith
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dbhost
Chucker wrote:
Is yours like post #25 above?


At this time, I don't know. I haven't had it apart yet. I am at the "oh crud it leaks out of the generator tip I need to do something about it" phase...
Love my old school Coleman liquid fuel gear. Looking for tips and tricks to make the most of it.

-Dave
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GrayClay
The rod is thin and brass; treat it carefully, don't bend or over tighten and it won't break. I never broke one either.
Clay. Sierra Foothills, California
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Mister Wilson
Grab the rod close to the valve stem when you loosen and tighten to minimize twisting and possibly breaking. 
John
H.C. Lanterns dealer
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #2001 A Turd's Odyssey
Canadian Blues #028
Coleman Slant Saver #31
Looking for 6-56 and 6-58 Birthday lanterns.
There's been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about.
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SteveRetherford
i like to add heat first too .
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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dbhost
So I put fuel in the tank like I said but this time I ran the flame control knob all the way in all the way out several times,  As well as working the light and cook lever up-and-down.

After a few minutes of fiddling with it like this the leakage seems to have stopped.

I ran the stove and it seems to work like a brand new stove so I don't think I'm going to tear the generator or valve apart quite yet.
Love my old school Coleman liquid fuel gear. Looking for tips and tricks to make the most of it.

-Dave
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paulbarrette
Ok, this was an awesome thread.  My 425 thrift machine worked great but then I noticed it leaking from the generator tip.  I removed the valve as described and put it in a drill, ran some 600 sand paper against the beveled edge and that fixed the problem.  I couldn't see the groves with naked eye, but with my phone I got a close up and zoomed.  Clearly I am getting old!
Paul Barrette
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