200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

pipenfly
Hello. I'm not sure if this was ever covered before. I looked around the forum and came up empty so here is how I made a regulator assembly lever. Reason being, I contacted Cigar Mike about purchasing one of these assemblies to replace one that I destroyed on one of my 502's[new]
Mike told me he HAD a bunch and they didn't last two hours when he put them up on the OCP site. Before I was through the seven stages of grief and before I asked for help, I thought I'd try and make my own lever.
So, out came the caliper and the lever has a diameter of 3/32". My local Ace store has some brass rod stock. $1.47 later, I came out with this
P_20200623_160638_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg
For this project, I figured the Z bend in the lever that moves the eccentric block had to be made first and then the rod inserted into the rest of the assembly. The way I was looking at it, any attempt to complete the lever first, insert it into the assembly and then bang a Z bend into it might destroy some other part of the assembly.
P_20200624_073740_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  I cobbled together this Z bend contraption out of a cheap old little anvil and some key stock I purchased at a flea market.
P_20200624_084837_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg    A piece of key stock was cut and fit into the anvil's hardy hole in order to create a small ledge in the hole and to act as a stop for when the rod stock is stamped. Another piece of key way was cut to make the stamp. All the edges of the stamp were filed so they had a sloppy fit into the anvil. Also, a channel was filed into the bottom end of the stamp so it will hold the brass rod in place.
P_20200624_085258_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg 
P_20200624_084820_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg 
A couple of well planned whacks to the stamp with a hammer on the rod stock and I have a nice little Z bend. I forgot to take a picture of the bend in the rod stock before I set it into the assembly😴
Here is a comparison of the extension of the eccentric blocks of the two assemblies.
P_20200624_075444_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  If they were on working stoves, the cleaning needles would be fully extended into the gas tips. The one on the bottom does not extend as far out as the one on top but I was pretty confident it would be ok to run.
A small drill bit clamped into a small vise was used to make the bend on the lever.
P_20200624_080815_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  The finished product.
P_20200624_082116_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  Full blast on the stove
P_20200624_083151_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  Low simmer/clean
P_20200624_083232_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  I hope this helps or at least, entertains.
Quote
SteveRetherford
your determination really worked out great , looks factory from here .
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
Quote
Tgarner01
Perfect! I like your method. Hammer and a punch!
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
Quote
zoomkat
Having been challenged with a cleaning leaver in the past, I looked at how a replacement might be made. At that time Walmart had a package of large brass paperclips I considered using to make the lever rod. To get the bends in the eccentric tip I considered using a small chisel or a Dremel tool cutoff wheel to crimp/cut to facilitate the eccentric tip bends. I managed to repair the original lever, but something to think about as parts get scarce. 
Quote


...
...
Welcome to the Coleman Collectors Forum, an international forum of Coleman enthusiast and collectors, as such people from all over the world come here to read about Coleman collecting, repair, and to meet and make friends. The pages contained here are intended for the use of amateur collectors and people interested in Coleman collecting, restoration and repair as a hobby. It goes without saying to refrain from political posts, personal attacks and inflammatory posts.

Please note, all postings are the personal opinions of the members posting, the owner, administrators and moderators of the forum do not warrant the accuracy of posted information or endorse the safety of such.