200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
Nevada_Ed
We have had some good posts on seasoning cast iron in the past but a couple of them have been lost. I started reading on the subject on the Internet. There was a lot of conflicting information but I was able to figure out what experienced people thought was best. Now some say use only lard, others Crisco, also that you can use vegetable oils, and some say you can't, with reasons like it will be sticky etc. Temperatures and time varies all over the place.

Some stuff was easy, never sandblast cast iron to clean. Do not use the extreme heat of red hot coals to burn off the old stuff you will see sometimes recommended (it can warp the pan). From what I read and remembered from childhood at home I got my project underway.

Reading on the subject was interesting, as in just what is going on in "seasoning" a pan. I had thought you were just filling the cast iron pours and sealing the surface and indeed that is part of it. Through heat and oxidation the surface oils and fat become plasticized and polymerized, it turns out you are making your own non-stick resin surface that keeps food from sticking and protecting the cast iron from rust.

This pan came from a flea market, not too bad but crusty and some rust from neglect. Per stuff I had read it got a coat of Easyoff oven cleaner and placed in a plastic bag for a couple of days. Wow, that worked really well and it only needed some scrapping to finish up cleaning. A soak in citric acid finished off the little rust that remained. Clean low heat dried I was ready to start the seasoning process.

Enough cast iron collectors had written that Pam vegetable non-stick spray is a good choice for use so I went with that (plain, not the butter flavored version), it was already in the kitchen. Seems like everyone says to coat and wipe off the excess, place the pan upside down in the oven to prevent any pooling that will cause problems. I also used a drip pan to help prevent a any drip mess and keep my wife happy. Again following the most common advice I had read I baked it for a couple of hours at 350 degrees. Turned the oven off and let i cool down slowly. Wiped it off and repeated the above steps once more. My neighbor came home about that time and I asked if she had some Crisco and she did, what the heck I thought, lets do that too! So one more round of seasoning, this time using Crisco.

I am totally surprised how well it came out, and we have used it already. It works great, and the surface feels a lot like a Teflon coated pan. It really is non-stick, even eggs came out very nicely. My wife was delighted too, I was making breakfast for us because I wanted to try it out, lol.  Here are a couple of pictures, sorry for being long winded here.  Ed



    

So I am thinking if it works for cast iron and high carbon steel... I am doing a Coleman oven that had some rust but is in good shape. Here it is going through the second coating, using a single burner Coleman 500 stove to heat it:

Ed

There are 10 kinds of people in this world, those who understand binary, and those who don't.

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hurricaner
Ed, that trick also works well for the burner bowls on stoves.

Sam
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campmaster
Your right on ed. Only i dont use the oven part of it. The way i learned, was the crisco way. Heat it pretty damn hot on the stove top and keep the flames on high. Wipe a wadded paper towel in the crisco tub get a pretty good coat on it, and then rub it in the pan. It smokes immediately and then just begins to harden like you said. Making a non stick coating.
 I keep wiping each time the smoke begins to subside. Prob takes 3 mins. If its too hot, you will notice the oil burns off too quickly. You just back the heat down 10% or so, and youll notice the oil stays but smokes.
 Repeat like 10 times.
 Then youll start to notice, it takes longer for the smoking to subside...and the surface just stays looking shiny. You can turn the heat up more now, and do it about 5 more times.
 You build a NICE shiny coat into it and nothing will stick to it.

I did 5 iron skillets this week alone. Thats all i cook with in the house, and i take the same ones camping with me.
 I spray a little bit of pam in them before i cook to double up on NO possibility of sticking, and truely nothing sticks to them.
 When done, i take the spatula and clean out anything that dried on after i took the food out. I wipe out with a sponge and set back on the stove.
 No soap and no heavy scrubbing required.
 
So... why would anyone use teflon coated cancer causing non stick pans again?   lol
ICCC Member #1045

Dave
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swimmy83843

We've been cooking with the cast iron almost exclusively also,  the wife through out the tef-flake a while ago.  I thought I did a pretty good season job on the main skillet, but it's wearing through now.  Looks like I need to do it again.  I mainly followed what Ed did, only instead of on the oven I did it on the outside grill, I've got a Natural Gas Weber grill, so no need to worry about running out of propane, and no stinking up the house.

Craig

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0101
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BigLew
Looks good, ED. I use cast iron a lot too, It has been a while since I've gotten any new (or old) cast iron that needed initial seasoning. I use my dutch oven allot I made jambalaya in it last night and Chicken and dumplings last week I have made a few salty dishes like this in it lately and the seasoning is beginning to wear again. What I normally do is fry fish in it and then it is good again. So I plan to fry some fish tonight I may use my 413G I got last March. If I do I will post pics in a new thread.

As for the pan,  well done, ED. (cheesy pun intended)  Now you too have an excuse to use a Coleman stove more often.
I saw the light, no more darkness, no more night. - H. Williams Sr.
CCLXXV A.S. #LXXXIII ¡Viva el 275!
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danduhman

I know I am a relative new-by here but I have quietly been collecting Coleman products for over twenty years ,I was a charter member of the iccc but I got tired of paying the dues and not really getting anything out of it ,I have also been a collector of cast iron cookware for almost as long an am a member of the now defunct lone star dutch oven society as well as a dues paying member the Wagner Griswold collectors society ,I dropped out of that as well ,it was too political.I am telling all of this not as a smart ass know it all but too give some background for what i want to share about the care of cast iron (I have over a hundred pieces of cast iron cookware as well as about a hundred pieces of Coleman equipment. The best way to clean cast iron is to use an electrolysis set up i wont go into that because it is posted in other threads on here. Either lard or Crisco work well once you have it cleaned ,I cure mine when I fire up my smoker pit I put on my meat and then put the greased up cast iron in their with it making sure it is not touching anything that would keep the smoke from surrounding it ,if you don't have a smoker the oven works ok it just doesn't get as dark as it does ,once you have it seasoned try not to cook to much acid based food such as tomatoes ,it will erode the seasoning ,don't put it in the dish washer hand wash it and dry it on the stove top and then lightly oil it only use soap and a lot of scrubbing if it is really dirty.I hope that helps

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LP
I have been using cast iron for decades - and I made a convert out of Suzanne! We LOVE cast iron. And I have tried all kinds of methods - I like the Criso one the best. And you can sure tell what the quality of the cast iron is too! I have had pans that took forever to season. Then I got this griddle on the last PNW gathering. Took it home - two applications only and it looks likea black mirror! And for only $12??!!!!

Impossible to beat. Every single ono-stick pot or pan I have ever had would up in the trash. I have a cast iron dutch oven that is still going strong.

And is it me, or does food cooked in / on cast iron just taste better?
One must always take the high road - all other roads are dead ends.

LP

ICCC Member #846
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242burner
I do the intial seasoning with lard, then I fry some bacon.  I clean with kosher salt and scrub brush. I rinse with water and put it on a stove burner and chase off the water, then use a paper towel with lard on the inside surface.

Anything you use will build up and become tacky Ed.  I stopped using Crisco for this reason.  No tomato sauce or acid foods until you get a nice patina going.

My brother-in-law put my best pan in the dishwasher.  Took that patina off completely and had a nice flash rust all over the pan.   I saw my mom put one in the fire place with no ill effects.  I have heard that can pop a pan.  If you are going to burn one, you want the even heat of a self cleaning oven, or a bed of bbq coals.
1928 L-220 "Slant" from Russ
1919 Air-O from Jerry
500 Speedmaster

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danduhman

I forgot to mention ,dont put a cold peice of iron on a hot fire it will crack let it warm up next to the fire ,i grabbed one when i was on a hunting trip that had been laying out all night and set it on my coleman stove to start breakfast and it cracked right down the middle sounded like a shotgun ,scared the socks off of me!

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MustXcape
Wow! That pan sure came out nice! Reminds me of the display on a local antique shop specializing in antique iron.

As long as all this expertise is here, I have a question. I have several pieces of severely rusted cast iron pieces that I have not decided how to deal with the rust. I know sand blasting is not recommended, presumably as it would erode the iron, open up more pores on the iron, and embed grit in the iron.  Nevertheless there has got to be a fine grit abrasive appropriate for use (glass bead?, plastic bead?, bicarbonate soda blasting?). I considered electrolysis, but the black residue left behind does not look appetizing, and would be embed in the pores, impossible to get out. Right now I have settled on wire brushing followed by repeated treatments of food grade citric acid. If anyone can suggest an alternate (less labor intensive) method, I'd be happy to give it a try.

I mentioned to a dealer once my interest in a particular piece of Lodge Logic cast iron and he scoffed, stating that the modern stuff in no way compares to antique iron. I believe he is correct as it has been my observation that the older iron like you have shown here is a much finer grain with a smoother factory finish compared to the rougher textured iron produced today. I would conclude that the quality of the final seasoned finish is greatly dependent of the factory surface finish, don't you think?

So what soap do you use to wash your cast iron? I have read detergents are out, hand washing only, and through rinsing, but most dish soaps today are detergents. Other than a specialty soap sold for this purpose, what do you recommend?

As to modern cookware, they say a lot of people today suffer iron deficiencies that did not occur in years past because the got all the iron they needed from their cookware. I like to think this compensates for the additional energy required for and lost in the use of cast iron versus modern cookware.
I can stop collecting anytime. I just don't want to.... Soooo.... How much do you want for that?
[75x48200a1][75x4840][75x4810][75x4820][75x4860][75x4890][75x4830]
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danduhman

wire brushing leaves rust in the pours if you are going to do it any way don't use a brass one it will embed itself into the pours of the iron after the electrolysis you just wash off the goop with soap and hot water and nothing is left the other method is to spray it real good with easy off oven cleaner and the stick it in a plastic trash bag and leave it in the sun for a few days this only works on built up carbon ,not rust and you still have to deal with the goop.Good luck,if you want to know everything their is abought it go to the griswold and wagoner collectors society website . http://www.griswoldandwagner.com also if you are going to blast it the safest thing to use us crushed walnut shells.

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Assassin
nice seasoning job on the skillet!!!!!
my dad collected cast iron, and so have i over the years, yard sales, estate sales, flea markets, if it's under 3 bucks and made in the US of A, it's going home with me, Love cooking with it at home and my hunting camp.
ps---i have picked up tons of cast iron for .25 cents to a buck each at yard sales.
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Quicklite
Hey, the cast iron skillet is the ONLY way to fry up a mess of bacon.  It just somehow tastes much better because of the whole process start to finish, especially in the great outdoors.  Love my No. 10 Griswold skillet for this purpose.  After the bacon, throw in some chopped onions to brown in the bacon fat, then the chopped potatos for the BEST hash browns ever.   Then, fry up two eggs and your breakfast is ready! 

I believe we Colemanaholics are all of the same mind here.  -Q
Jules Sooo out of storage space, BUT always room for just one more ARC lantern.
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LakeGeorge
I've been using cast iron for many years now and I believe it is the best for cooking.

I season my pieces in my BBQ grill.


Gary Coleman, I am.
I.C.C.C. #1035
11th Annual East Coast Coleman Convention, June 5-9, 2019. Gettysburg, PA
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Scouterjan
no non stick pans in our house either, just cast iron, my 15 inch Wagner holds about 3 pounds of bacon, when its cooked, just wipe it clean
jan

"ebgone bahwagh agi" Harvest Gatherer

Mitakiuye Oyasin " All My Relations"
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AzWolf
I'm sorry, guys...two non-stick pans in the house.

But in my defense, my wife bought 'em, I didn't!!!

Let's see...off the top of my head, one large skillet, one small skillet, one...I don't know, "big, deep skillet with lid"? One round griddle (perfect for making 8" tortillas!), one smaller (not as) deep skillet with the dual-purpose (ie another skillet) lid.....

And those are the ones in the house. I've got a boxed set of three skillets, a long, two-sided griddle, and a dutch over out back, but they're a newer set and yes, they're MUCH "grainier" than the old stuff. I've been trying to figure out a way to either A.) lathe them up, and machine the insides, bottom and sides; or B.) fixed-mount them, and do the machining. Heck, at this stage in the game I'm ready to break a couple of whetstones and invest the time in doing it by hand!

What's the difference between "Made in China" vs. "Made in Hell"? I'll let you know when somebody "does" figure it out!! (although I think melting the iron to cast would be easier in Hell)
Lee
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techie
The current Lodge cast iron (not the enameled stuff), while rougher than the old pieces you can find at garage sales, is at least still made in the US. I am thinking about buying a new Lodge dutch oven, it's one of the few options left for US-made cast iron.  

Ed, you have already started stage 2 of seasoning - cook everything in it. I think that is way more important than how you start. Every time I have bacon my seasoning gets a bit better.

My skillet's a "Wagner Ware Sidney O" too. When its seasoning was new I would sometimes rub a bit of bacon grease on it while it was heating to dry. Now it's getting closer to that "black mirror" state people talk about. Eggs slide around just like teflon, but they taste so much better. 


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Big_Mike
We are cast iron fans as well.

For initial cleaning, one ting we did and liked was using the ovens self-cleaning cycle to bake/burn the decades of oxidation off.  

Remove the oven racks.
Place about four coffee mugs/cups (ceramic) upside down in the bottom of the oven around the heating coil or just on the bottom if you have a gas oven.  Don't use any mugs that have any type of writing on them.  Don't ask me how I learned anniversary vacation writing does not stand up to the high heat of a cleaning cycle.
Place cast iron piece on coffee mugs.
Set cleaning cycle for four hours and walk away.
After everything cools down, remove cast iron and wash.  I use baking soda instead of soap.
Immediately begin seasoning process of your choosing.  If you don't, the cast iron will flash rust in about an hour.

If desired, you can put more then one piece in the oven at a time, just don't stack them.  If they fit side-by-side, go for it.

Hope this helps.
"If we knew what we were doing, it would not be called research" Albert E.

Some people are like slinkys, not much good for anything, yet would still bring a smile to your face if you pushed them down a flight of stairs.

"If it ain't broke, you're not trying hard enough. And remember, this fix is only temporary, unless it works." --Red Green
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kb5zfa
Lee my wife had one of those rugh skillets I used an orbital sander on it. Took a while but she likes it now.
Joe
Joe
Dunlap New Mexico
Can't find that on your map.
ICCC #961
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LP
I love garage sale finds in cast iron! Years ago I was at this one garage sale, and I noticed a large cast iron pan by the woman running the sale. It has a $2 price tag on it. I went to pick it up and it took both hands! I flipped it over an proudly cast in the bottom "MADE IN USA".

I think this sucker was 14 inches! And I could not get the $2 out of my wallet fast enough. It had never been used and only had some falsh rust on it. She said she did not like it because it was so heavy. (Oh darn!)

Some days are just so stinking good.
One must always take the high road - all other roads are dead ends.

LP

ICCC Member #846
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gijills

I love cast iron have 2 bean pots 5-6 skillets and just got a chicken cooker. It is all we use and they do work on one of those glass top stoves.

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AzWolf
Thanks, Joe! Guess Wifey and I are going to have to make a trip around the tool stores!

Me: "But Honey, if we spend the money on a high-quality machine now, we won't be tossing it out because it burned up!"

Lee
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242burner

How to clean cast iron: You will not always need to do this, but for really crudded up pans get a dedicated brush, kosher salt, lard or crisco



Add some salt



After you chase out the water the pores will be open, so apply your lard or crisco,

This is the no soap method to cleaning.  Most of the time you will not even need to do this.  Just wipe it/brush it and go
1928 L-220 "Slant" from Russ
1919 Air-O from Jerry
500 Speedmaster

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Jim_l
I picked up a deep chicken fryin' skillet a while back and stripped it with electrolisis then while I was at it I did this too,

Grate from,,well, let's see if you know,,,,?

   Four coats of olive oil at about 400 degrees. No cool down between coats.
 
 Jim

Matthew 5:16: "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." Jim-- Coleman Blues Member #014
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mworley1
Thanks for this forum. After I bought a cast iron dutch oven I used the guide at:

http://www.campchef.com/cast-iron-maintenance.html


I like the other information too.


Mark
Psalms 119:105 Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.
"The smell of naphtha triggers my OCD collecting..."
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flatbrokeforge
I'm loving this thread. Good info on the cast iron seasoning.

My current stock is all old stuff, nothing new. A 6 qt. dutch oven, an 8 place popover pan (needs cleaned and re-seasoned), Skillets (a no.3, 2-No. 5's, No. 8, and two more guargantuan bastards (one is over 14 inches w/extra handle) under the counter that only come out for special occasions!

Most all of mine came to me in seasoned shape, except for a few. I've used the "through them in a hot fire method" with good results, only problem is handling them is problematic sometimes depending on size. I found they MUST be coated with the crisco (or fat/oil of choice) almost immediately upon pulling them from the coals. I give them a good brushing with a fine wire brush to knock off any leftover crud/ashes, then move directly to the crisco coating. If the skillet is allowed to cool to quickly without coating it, flash rust is a certainty from the moisture in the air. I try to do this in the evening before the dew starts setting in. Also, the evening light is better to see red-color of the pan to allow you judge the time left for seasoning before it cools. I generally give 3 to 4 coats by wiping the crisco on with a towel.

I've also used the oven method, which works well on fairly clean, non-cruddy items.

I never use anything caustic on them if I can help it.

-Aaron



Looking for 8/78 & 3/05 b-day lanterns.
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chameleon
The best seasoned pan surface ever.
If  you have access to a wood cookstove ( camp etc... )
If the wood cookstove is used  as your primary heating source. Take advantage of oven while in use. Place your cast iron pans / pots inside the oven. Every so often as you remember give them a even wipe inside and out with a light coating from a cloth saturated with Crisco Lard.
After hours and days of attention using the oven while the wood cook stove is fired up you will end up with best rock hard shiny seasoned surface / dark patina you will ever experience.
Twice a year I spend at least a week at a camp with a wood cookstove which I take advantage of every moment of its superior ability to achieve the ultimate seasoned surface that last and last and last. Which enhances not only the cooking ability of each piece but also the display ability of your cast iron cookware for all to appreciate. 

As a bonus while there I also get a chance to put my cast iron cookware collection to use to it's full potential. Nothing taste better when cooked using on old wood cookstove with well seasoned genuine cast iron cookware of the same era.
Especially combined with the lighting of a few vintage coleman lanterns in the background.


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Nevada_Ed
Well this has been fun. Weekend camping trip and I lent our griddle to the couple that was doing dinner. they had one of those big propane cooker stand stoves, near four foot long, maybe 40 to 50K BTU per burner. You could cook a 30 gallon whatever on one and have it boil in no time. Oh man they had it turned up to burn status, after what they were cooking was done then left it on high for another ten minutes! Burn the heck out of my Lodge Logic griddle. Ok I took it home and today put it on the BBQ (thanks who ever suggest using the BBQ). After it had burnt off the excess it was cleaned with water and and I seasoned it again, two times on the BBQ. I took their griddle and did it at the same time using the rack above the lower one, they had burnt the piss out of that one too. Start the heat off at a reasonable temperature is what I learned, and turn the heat off when there is nothing cooking, lol.  Picture isn't that good, but shows it back to normal.  Ed

before it had a large circle of bare metal that had already flash rusted:


Ed

There are 10 kinds of people in this world, those who understand binary, and those who don't.

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david78212
Boil salt water in it to remove rust and scrub with a stiff brush - NOT A METAL BRUSH.

Seasoning? Cook bacon in it, been doing mine this way for years. The seasoning comes from what you cook in it.

NEVER EVER wash it in the dishwasher or with dish soap or any kind of soap, really hot water and a stiff (plastic) brush does wonders.

Cast iron IS the original non-stick pan and is not as complicated as it was ever made out to be.

"Common sense has to come in at some point in time."
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mowerdave694
I found a really nice cast iron skillet and lid in a junk pile.  It is really rusty and cruddy.  I am in the process of doing the EZ Off oven cleaner for a few days.  But I will need to citric acid soak it for a while.  What proportions are any of you using for the soak.  Its probably going to take a five gallon bucket to soak it in.  One cup citric to five gallons water.  What works best.  I know heat helps.
Dave
Dave

Ebay handle mowerdave402
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Sparks
I have to confess I have a stack of my grandma cast iron that's in the shed. She had one pan that never left the stove top and it had a coffee can with Bacon grease next to it. I can smell the salmon patties she cook still. I think I will dig them and use them.
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easyrizer

I have 7 or 8 lodge pieces, Ed.  I have a glass cook top at home, so I can't use it there . But whenever I cook bacon, I pour off the excess into a can, and save that for seasoning the Lodge cookware.  And As you've shown good seasoning means several times before use, not just once.

My Lamps bigger than your lamp
David
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gijills

We use cast iron all the time and have a glass cook top. the things to look out for are don't drop it. make sure the cast iron has a blat bottom if it is uneven or has a lip you may have issues.

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danduhman

I also have a glass top stove and have had for over 20 years and practically all I use is cast iron i have a cast iron gumbo pot that holds three gallons of liquid ,probably weighs 34 lbs when full .I also have a large pot that I use to hot water bath my home canned pickles 10 quarts at a time that probably weighs close to 50 lbs when loaded and I have never had any issues.I have used griddles ,skillets (with and without heat rings) ,cast iron waffle irons .I usually have to get out the razor blade scraper every now and then and the special cleanser and give it a good scrapping ,but it looks new when i get through.

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Nevada_Ed
Yikes, I too have been using the cast iron on the glass top stove here at home. I did check for any roughness, figured I would sand them flat if I found anything that could gouge but it was not necessary. I plan on getting some more pieces, looking for Griswold, Wagner and Lodge now. All others I have been passing on so far, well if I spotted some Erie..... I would get that for sure. I am very glad so many people have mentioned cast iron on the forum, took me long enough to get a hint, lol. But I remember it growing up too, even my father seasoning it on the natural gas stove, always Crisco! Just got curious and looked Crisco up, in Wikipedia. Sounds like they changed the formula over time.

Ed

There are 10 kinds of people in this world, those who understand binary, and those who don't.

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danduhman

Ed,if you are looking for cast iron Griswold and Erie are the same company but be prepared to pay a premium and watch out for cracked or warped stuff.wagoner ware is a little bit less than a comparable Griswold piece the best the cheapest of the three is old lodge as most of it is unmarked but you can tell it buy the three breaks in the heat ring ,if you are holding at the handle and looking at the bottom their is a 1/8 break in the heat ring at 9 o'clock ,12 and 3 several other good brands are merit,sears.wards.piqua,volraith,birmingham stove and range ,favorite,the merit sears and wards were mostly made by Griswold

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fatherof31970

Chameleon and me think the same on this one.  I grew up with cast iron and my parents used to season it by rubbing it bacon fat and putting it in the wood stove.  Heat it up and pull it out a couple of times.  Then they would stack it together with coats of veggie oil and paper towels.  You never needed to clean it except for wipping it out.  God help anyone in front of my mom doing dishes and grabbing the cast iron to wash in the soapy water!  Out in the woods the skillet can just be covered in crisco lard or bacon fat and put in the fire.  Does the same thing.  Just don't go to red hot.  I have lots of it around and some in the camping gear but damn those bins are heavy.  LOL!  Oh and besides cooking cast iron has another use.  Just ask my mom.  Use it for throwing it at smartassed kids.  I must have been one of them as I dodged a lot of it!!!

"Sit tall in the saddle, Hold your head up high Keep your eyes fixed where the trail meets the sky And live like you ain't afraid to die And don't be scared, just enjoy your ride" From "The Ride" by the late Chris Ledoux. Ed, Moscow, Idaho 
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gijills
That would sting a bit.
"I must have been one of them as I dodged a lot of it!!!"
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fatherof31970

I don't think mom was aiming that well intentionally.  Just got us all out of the house in a hurry.  LOL!  And just the threat was enough to move us quickly. 

"Sit tall in the saddle, Hold your head up high Keep your eyes fixed where the trail meets the sky And live like you ain't afraid to die And don't be scared, just enjoy your ride" From "The Ride" by the late Chris Ledoux. Ed, Moscow, Idaho 
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Sparky

First, that CI stove grate looks like it came from an old KampKook or Sears KookRite two burner stove, vintage 1930.  Second, I know this is probably more than everyone wants to know but cast iron does not have pores.  Now, I admit I have a special attachment to cast iron; my first job out of college was as a metallurgist in a cast iron foundry.  Let me post a small portion of an article on cast iron :

The graphite flakes, which are rosettes in three dimensions, have a low density and hence compensate for the freezing contraction, thus giving good castings that are free from porosity. The flakes of graphite have good damping characteristics and good machinability because the graphite acts as a chip breaker and lubricates the cutting tools. In applications involving wear, the graphite is beneficial because it helps retain lubricants. The flakes of graphite also are stress concentrators, however, and lead to poor toughness. The recommended applied tensile stress is therefore only a quarter of the actual ultimate tensile strength.

 

The pores we all refer to are actually the graphite flakes in the cast iron that absorb the oils and hold them at the surface.  Not that all this science is necessary to enjoying the beauty and benefits of CI cook ware, but I thought it was interesting.

"Thy Word is a lamp unto my feet and a light unto my path."  Psalm 119

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SteveRetherford

i found it interesting Sparky , thanks for shareing that , id have never known . the same kind of graphite we use in lantern packings ? only ground up into flakes . i have a box of powdered graphite flakes i found at a swap meet . does any one know what is the process to make it liquid and make or mold some valve packings ?

[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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200Apples
Quote:
i have a box of powdered graphite flakes i found at a swap meet.  does any one know what is the process to make it liquid and make or mold some valve packings ?



If I am not mistaken, I believe I have noticed a fibrous substance in our lanterns' graphite packings... probably to assist handling of the packing before installation, more than anything else. A more-or-less 'solid' graphite packing might be too brittle to ship, handle, or install... that is, if I have indeed actually seen any fibers whatsoever.
-
"I intended to take more pics, but I am easily distracted by food and beer and awesomeness."
- bullof7battles, Lake George 2012

Open 1/4 Turn to Left and Light

ICCC #990
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Sparky
The graphite is added as powder to the liquid iron along with silicon and manganese and maybe some other alloys.  The graphite (pure carbon) is dissolved into the liquid iron and when the iron solidifies, the graphite precipitates as flakes in the iron.  If MAGNESIUM is added, the graphite precipitates as nodules rather than flakes and it is known as ductile iron. DI is much tougher and more ductile than the grey cast iron.

You might try adding the powdered graphite to a heavy grease to make it more resistant to liquid leaks.

"Thy Word is a lamp unto my feet and a light unto my path."  Psalm 119

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red_metallic
gijills wrote:

We use cast iron all the time and have a glass cook top. the things to look out for are don't drop it. make sure the cast iron has a blat bottom if it is uneven or has a lip you may have issues.



Here too. I'd never thought about the potential for damage though and will keep that in mind the next time I use it.
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Northof49
After seasoning, how do you store your CI?

I'm in the process of seasoning my dutch oven for next weeks camping and would like to know how you store it.
Do just leave it open to the elements? bag it? box it?
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nickmudd
I leave my cast iron skillet on the stove. Make sure you dry it well after rinsing it out. I always put mine on the burner or the oven to dry it out. I always coat my cast iron in a thin layer of bacon fat when storing for a while.
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kcdarnell58

Some of my cast iron pans are very seldom used. I use mineral oil as a final seasoning on them so they never get sticky or rancid.     -Kevin-

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Nevada_Ed
While trying to remember and figure it all out I read they are best stored in open air, if stacked, place a paper towel between each. That stuff came from one of the cast iron user/collectors sites. There were lots of variations, I sort of muddled through myself and am happy with the results.

Ed

Ed

There are 10 kinds of people in this world, those who understand binary, and those who don't.

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LakeGeorge
Bump



Gary Coleman, I am.
I.C.C.C. #1035
11th Annual East Coast Coleman Convention, June 5-9, 2019. Gettysburg, PA
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Sandrion
I was sitting and thinking the other day and wondered if you could "deep fry" per say, a CI pan. Like in a turkey frying setup. It gets heat, it gets oil... If anyone has any thoughts shout it out As for now, I will stick to my bacon grease and oven method.
"There are Two Things I Can’t Stand in This World: People Who are Intolerant of Other People’s Culture, and the Dutch."

~~~Always looking for a 9/92 birthday!~~~

Flash-"Perfect for that collector of "things that could horribly disfigure me for life""

"What's my name!!"

"I won't make you fix it tonight..."

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