200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
ticonderoga
Hi everyone, I am new to the Coleman addiction and up to this time I have just cleaned up and got my stoves and lanterns running, leaving the "battle scars" of age show. But now I want to really clean a lantern up and make it like brand new. I have read here that people use citric acid to remove rust. My question is this the best method and where can I purchase citric acid. Thanks in advance. 
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mikew
Welcome to the Forum!!!  I don't know if there is a best way.  Members seem to use a method each is comfortable with.  I like to use electrolysis for whole burner cages, hand tools, stove cases, etc.  and naval jelly for spot rust removal. Electrolysis will remove the rust, most paint, and any gunk stuck to the metal. It is simple and safe. Many members like to use Evaporust and like the results.  Other than lemon juice, I have not used citric acid yet, but I believe it is available at Home Depot or Lowes.  

On brass parts I use mostly a soak in white vinegar since it is so cheap, but have also used a 50/50 mixture of lemon juice and water. Then soak the brass parts in water with baking soda to neutralize the vinegar. After drying with compressed air, I buff them with 0000 steel wool to make them gleam.

A lot of the members here use Mother's Mag Polish cream for final polishing. It is available at Wal-Mart.
Mike
"... at evening time, it shall be light." Zechariah 14:7

Slant Saver #05 Milspec Ops 0045
Quicklite Crew #27
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dpatten
eBay or a homebrew/wine making store are excellent places to purchase citric acid.  It's very cheap on ebay.  I bought 5 pounds last year and have 4.75 left.

As for which is best, well, they're all good for different things.  Phosphoric acid, vinegar and citric acid will all work.  As will Molasses and electrolysis.  It might be better to consider them as tools in a kit rather than 100% interchangeable.  Molasses is great for brittle, fine metal.  Citric is cheap and effective, phosphoric will leave a rust resistant coating, etc.

Dennis the Peasant

ICCC Member #1337 (Thanks Dean!)
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0086

"One of the sanest, surest, and most generous joys of life comes from being happy over the good fortune of others."
-R.A. Heinlein-
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Rubing
Welcome! You can purchase a small quantity of citric acid at Meijers or other similar stores in the canning section, made by Ball for a couple of bucks.
ICCC # 1402
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bwperreault
Most bulk food stores carry citric acid. It is used in cooking and is sometimes called sour salt.
Brian
ISO 6-56, 7-88, and 2-91.  Found a 1-91, it may be as close as I get
Thank you to all servicemen and servicewomen, past and present.
My curious nature has gotten me into more trouble...
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Gavercronos
Welcome to the place!
Do you want it like new or better? It's easy to do the latter, most of the procedures people have detailed on here go above and beyond simple restoration. Brass tubes weren't buffed, and paint (on both fount and frame) was just a thin coat with no primer. Not discouraging you, just making you aware; lanterns and stoves with everything polished are quite pretty. As for acid, some people go find straight citric, some use lemon-lime kool-aid, and some (Myself among them) use white vinegar.
WillCat

Chautauqua County, New York
Slant Saver [svg]

Wanted: GPA dated 5/89 (Red 286?  Black Powerhouse? 508? Early Unleadeds? Canadian things? I'll settle for a propane job at this point) Vintage Sunbeam Mixmaster bowls and accessories, Ruby-cased 10in lamp shade, 7D Mag-lite
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DougA
Like the others have said, there are a variety of methods that can work very well.  For myself I am sold on Evaporust.  It's definitely pricey at $22/gal, but it is reusable and I have made good use of the gallon I have on my lanterns.  Some side-by-side comparisons below of some representative results:

Before and after of the collar of my 243A.
243collar.jpg 

My 242's burner frame, before & after:
242c-04.jpg 

It's amazing how well these rusty old relics clean up.  At the moment I am derusting a Dietz D-Lite wickie on which the Evaporust is doing a bang-up job.

Good luck and have fun!
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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jhutc13
Where do you find Evaporust?
Hutch
275 Appreciation Syndicate #0180
Milspec syndicate #0180
Coleman Slant Saver #0180
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ticonderoga
Thanks for the great advise, I will try a few of the options and see what works best for me.
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Trout
jhutc13 wrote:
Where do you find Evaporust?


My ACE Hardware carries it.

Mike
If a man made it, a man can fix it - My Father
ICCC 1473

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DougA
jhutc13 wrote:
Where do you find Evaporust?


Some auto parts stores carry it, too.  I get it at Advance Auto.

Find dealers here:
https://www.evaporust.com/distributors

DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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jhutc13
I looked online and a lot of places carry it. Man, that stuff is amazing.
Hutch
275 Appreciation Syndicate #0180
Milspec syndicate #0180
Coleman Slant Saver #0180
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Guff
+1 on using Evaporust on rusted steel parts. You can also use it on vents and it won't affect the porcelain. Just make sure it is the "real deal" Evaporust, and not some copy cat product with a similar name.
It is expensive, but you can resuse it many times.
I like to use a weak citric acid/water solution for cleaning the brass parts. Be sure to check the brass parts in the acid solution often and pull them out quick if they show any signs of turning pink. That is a sign that the acid is leaching the copper from the brass.

Keith. 
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dday
I originally started out using Vinegar with good results. Then I wanted fast and used "The Works" acid toilet cleaner for awhile. Then I tried 1 tablespoon to a couple quarts of warm water. And now thanks to my buddy Dego, I tried and am using a 5 gallon bucket of Evaporust with amazing results. Its not as fast as acid, but is still pretty quick (day or two) and the results are awesome. I don't forsee any other changes after using it now. Just my two cents!
Dan 


ICCC #1053
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curlyjoe_99
I will agree with using what you have and are comfortable with. another cheap source of citric acid is unsweetened kool-aide they are mostly citric acid and are under a buck for the testing.

Before you dive in, decide what you want to do the the piece. if a fount is nickle, then some of the acids can damage it if let to work too long. if you have a painted fount then I like to acid bath and strip at the same time. you can paint strip and then acid bath for rust.

the one trick I do is spray the Check valve (CV) with carb cleaner to get rid of any residue then I completely soak the painted fount, submerge it, and get as many air bubbles out as you can. with the CV installed but no pump rod. I do the slow soak with thinned vinegar in a 5 gallon bucket. Eventually you will want to buy one with a lid but for your first attempt any bucket that hold your parts under the water line work. my mix is 1 gal vinegar- elcheapo from grocery- and 2-3gal hot tap water. I put it in on Monday and pull it friday night or saturday. Do the rinse under warm tap water and wipe it down with 0000 steel wool while you are rinsing to get rid of the black film and a quick dunk in the baking soda solution.

use any automotive polish you have and see if it works. you want to polish not wax it though. Mother's or blue magic seem to the most well used polishing products but most any of then work

hope this helps and enjoy the madness
Robert (AKA Curly)-- Heart-of-Texas! "Keep 'Em Working"  
MILSPEC_OPS & 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #9999

In Search of (ISO): evidence of a 220/228 series lantern dated 2/63    

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mnhogrider
I'm still pretty new to this hobby and have been using 3 different methods. I de-rust burner cages, collars and small hardware. Any founts that I've repainted I've sandblasted first.
Evaporust- works great, works even better warmed up. I used to stick a bowl of it in the microwave, then bought a used crock pot at Goodwill for 6 bucks. I use it over until it's real dirty and chunky. You need to scrub the piece with a brass brush to get all the loosened rust off.
Citric acid- works great. Is cheaper and easier to use. I use a teaspoon per gallon of water using the hottest tap water I can get or the crock pot. I get several uses out of the mix before it gets real dirty then I just dump it down the drain with a good water flush. Again, the parts have to be scrubbed to get the loosened rust off.
Electrolysis-my curiousity got the best of me and I've been experimenting with this method. It's more like a science project using water, washing soda, sacrificial steel, wires, and a battery charger all in a 5 gal pail. It's cool setting it up and watching the piece bubbling in the water. My family thinks I'm trying to be the next Walter White. What I don't like about this method is that the rust gets replaced by a black gunk that has to be scrubbed off with a wire brush, but even after a good scrubbing it still looks black and nasty. I then take the piece and put it into the warm citric acid to get the black tinge off it. So, there's more scrubbing and an extra step to get the same end result. And then I'm left with a bucket full of nasty rusty water with the now rusted sacrificial steel parts that have to be wire brushed clean. Dirty job with lots of splatter. A lot of people swear by this method and maybe I'm not doing it 100% correct, but I'm not sold on electrolysis.
After the part is clean and rust free, I finish with steel wool. I give the burner cages a coating of gun oil. The collars I polish with Mother's.
Wear rubber gloves when you're scrubbing or your hands will have a nice rust/black stain to them that's hard to get off.
Steve
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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NacEd
I will say some of the same things as others, got my citric acid off e-bay, a 5 lb bag lasts a long time.  Mainly do large pieces in it.  I have been using evaporust on the inside of founts and small parts, the evaporust works GREAT, like others have said warmer is better.
I would like to try the electrolysis, but just haven't done it yet.  I don't do sandblasting anymore, I've noticed small pits or indentions in the metal afterwards, made the paint finish look like mini orange peel.  Just my opinion.  I really don't use a wire brush either because of how it affects the metal.

Ed from Nacogdoches - Oldest town in Texas

When you are up to your ass in alligators, its hard to remember your initial objective was to drain the swamp
MilspecOps Syndicate #067 Sears Collectors Club #25 (pending)
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #165
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curtludwig
I like citric acid because its cheap and I can make it as strong or dilute as I want. Its also safe, it'd give you a belly ache but wouldn't kill you. The fumes from "The Works" toilet cleaner (hydrochloric acid) are NOT good for you and give me a headache.

I got my 5# of citric acid from Amazon, $20 with shipping included on my Prime account. I repacked it into quart sandwich bags so that I wouldn't accidentally ruin the whole bag if it got wet.

It doesn't take much citric acid powder to make a fairly strong acid, half a cup for 5 gallons is plenty. I soaked a whole wick lantern in it last summer.

Top tip, don't let your evaporust evaporate...
Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
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jhutc13
Read a post earlier that about two days is good enough for evaporust. What's the time if heated?
Hutch
275 Appreciation Syndicate #0180
Milspec syndicate #0180
Coleman Slant Saver #0180
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mnhogrider
It works a lot better(and faster)when it's warm, but it's hard to say how long it takes depending on the part and how badly it's rusted. The problem I have is a 220 size burner cage with the bale won't get covered with a gallon of Evaporust, so I do one half and the the other. With warm Evaporust, the average 220 size burner cage with average rust will be cleaned up in 24 hrs. If you had enough to completely cover the part (2 gals.) you could be done in 8 or so hrs. Severely rusted stuff takes longer.
It's worth the wait. It takes time, but the parts clean up real nice.
Steve
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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Fishenwi
Evaporust does work good...I use it a lot...leave a frame in for a couple days. Don't need to worry about forgetting a part soaking....which I tend to do the older I get. Also leave it soak inside the fount overnight, wash out, BB shake, soak again, rinse and repeat till good and clean.

For a fast clean...not necessarily for heavy rust removal that I have experienced like Evaporust....but The Works is pretty powerful stuff. Just be real quick and careful as it woks fast. I put it straight on some steel wool and start rubbing... Less than a minute...then wash off right away.

Citric acid works good to clean parts..like generators, air tubes, brass parts....... It removes some rust. Works best when hot. Like said earlier, don't forget or leave anything in too long or it will start to eat or leach out the metal. Also don't soak non brass parts in the same solution after cleaning a bunch of brass pieces...They tend to come out "colored". I have a few brass colored vent nuts now.
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Chucker
Citric acid, EvapoRust, wire wheel, and sometimes Muriatic acid inside founts/tanks.
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Bill
My 2-cents worth:

I like Evaporust, but it works slowly and it is pricey.  I use it for the inside of founts as it doesn't (seem to) create gases, so I don't have to worry about creating a pressure vessel.

For fast rust removal I used to use The Works toilet cleaner, when it was formulated with 20% hydrochloric acid.  Now it's diluted down to 10%.  Now I buy Vani-Sol toilet cleaner at Sam's Club.  It's 23% hydrochloric acid and it's fairly inexpensive.  It removes the rust right before your eyes--just make sure you're wearing eye, breathing and skin protection.

I've never tried electrolysis, but I plan to try it for a couple of stoves I want to restore.
Bill Sheehy, aka Merlotrin P.M.      ICCC #1390      eBay handle: wtspe
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #24  /  Mil-Spec Ops, Bernz-o-Matic, and Sears Syndicates #58
Looking for birthday lanterns dated 4/33, 9/33 & 7/86

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DougA
More evidence of Evaporust's capability.  I picked up a Dietz D-Lite wickie over the weekend that had a ton of surface rust on it.  I put it in a bucket of Evaporust Sunday evening and Monday afternoon this greeted me:

dlitederust1.jpg 

The entire lantern looked like the upper part when I started.  Mind you, this was at room temperature, which at this time of year in my basement is in the low 60s.  I inverted the lantern in the bucket and did the upper part overnight the next night.  I guess I shouldn't be so cheap and get enough of the stuff to cover a big piece like this better, [wink]

DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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JimL
WOW!  I've read a lot of praises for Evaporust, but that before/after picture of your Dietz says it all.

-Jim

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three lefts do.
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MR220F220G228G
I have used citric acid with good results on various items, but this thread made me want to try to soak a mica vent from an Air-O-Lite to clean it up. I was pretty sure it would not damage the vent and wanted it clean to use "as is". I make a pretty strong solution and use boiling water. Cleans up parts in a short time.

Here are the results:

Before
micabefore.jpg 

After

micaafter.jpg 

Mark, Ann Arbor area in Mi.
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Gand28
Good looking mica chimney!

I know you didn't mean to say vent in your post but for any newbie who reads this, don't soak any vent in strong citric solution. You'll haze porcelain and strip nickel.
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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curtludwig
Funny you should post your D-Lite, I did one this summer too.
Mine started pretty much like yours:
[IMG_20150608_204410473_zpsl22ab6ok] 

It looked like it had hung outside the barn at the place where I bought it, the bottom plate was perfect but everything else was coated in rust.

[IMG_20150731_165248885_zpsgumfxkty] 

I took it apart and soaked everything separately. The nice thing about citric acid is the price, it costs very little to make up a 5 gallon bucket.

[IMG_20150731_171349806_zpsy8e3tkr6] 

Later I put a rock on the lantern to hold it down. Since it had no internal rust I plugged the tank so it wouldn't fill.

After soaking any residual rust came off easily with a wire brush
[IMG_20150801_183625234_zpsjifeochh] 

Since the original finish was trashed I decided to paint

[IMG_20151009_141315968_zpsrggdwtif] 

Coleman green of course. This is Krylon Hunter green. I really like the Krylon, its easy to lay down. I was a little worried about the heat damaging the paint but it doesn't seem to...
Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
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myles860
Ive made the switch from evaporust to industrial rust eliminator its shipped as a power so you just add water. looks and smells and works as well as evaporust just alot cheaper. Just ordered another 5 gallons for $54 
Expendable
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curtludwig
5 gallons of the powder? How much liquid will that make?
Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
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curlyjoe_99
and would you share your source?

Curt, your krylon green reminds me of their millennium lanterns that have an adapter to allow for a small aluminum cup to be heated
Robert (AKA Curly)-- Heart-of-Texas! "Keep 'Em Working"  
MILSPEC_OPS & 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #9999

In Search of (ISO): evidence of a 220/228 series lantern dated 2/63    

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DougA
Nice job on the D-Lite save, Curt!  Mine came out really well.  The original finish is in great shape so I didn't need to paint it.  All I did was go over it with the Blue Magic polish.

Before/after shot:
dliteb4aft.jpg 

All it needs is a fuel cap, and that should be arriving any moment from Kirkman's.

I am intrigued by the powdered Evaporust, gotta go look for that.  It's great stuff but it is rather pricey, the powdered form sounds a little more affordable for a big quantity.
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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possum328
That looks great Doug, I dig the matte galvanized look.
Steve
I dream in Coleman green.
Proud owner of a new CV tool. (Yes, it is as good as they claim!)
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Trout
Blue Magic did that?  Wow!
Mike
If a man made it, a man can fix it - My Father
ICCC 1473

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DougA
Trout wrote:
Blue Magic did that?  Wow!


It started out looking pretty good after the Evaporust.  The Blue Magic just took off the last bit of soot/dirt/rust/kero stains.  It looked like it could use a little shine with steel wool, but I didn't want to do that so tried the Blue Magic instead and it produced what you see in the photo.
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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Erwin

Hi fellas.
This is a very interesting post. I've seen the perfect results of de-rusting and it's hard to believe that e.g. Evaporust can do that magic.
I've checked for a supplier of that stuff here in Germany and came up with THIS.
The Label might look different but I hope that's the very same stuff you're using. Pls. have a look and kindly let me know what you think.
Unfortunately there is no direct supplier in Germany and I definitely can't buy that in the U.S. and bring it home with me. They'd probably not even ship it to me via air freight. :-(
I have some badly rusted collars, even worse than Doug's in post no.7 above and I'd like to give it a try on those. If they would come out like Doug's I'd be totally excited. ;-))
Thanks and happy New Year to you.
Erwin.

My homepage: http://www.eschaefer.de
Pls. see navigation on HP for Collectors Maps.
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curtludwig
Hi Erwin, 

Looks like the same stuff, its basically the same claims they make here and its about the same color. Fortunately not very expensive to try it out.
Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
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mcdugal2
I think most of the parts I've tried in Evaporust have been extremely rusty and I've usually gave up on them after about a week in the solution. And that would be somewhere between 60 and 65 Deg. F.... And I'm not talking surface rust....
Phil Rhoades ICCC# 1125
The Coleman Blue's 243's. #035

"I'm a man, but I can Change, if I have to, I guess." - Red Green
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Tigerfans2
caveat: as others have mentioned, do not use Evaporust on zinc coated frame rests , etc.

ask me how I know



http://www.colemancollectorsforum.com/post/newbie-nickle-2nd-place-220d-resto-6685070?highlight=evaporust+frame+rest&pid=1280881648

"Do not put your frames that have been zinc coated from the factor in Evaporust!! It removes the zinc."
Coleman Slant Saver #58
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #8
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Erwin

Hi guys.
Thanks for your comments. I'm not going to try it on any coated materials, just the bare metals collars.
I think I'll buy a bottle of that stuff and see how it works...
Thanks again, Erwin.

My homepage: http://www.eschaefer.de
Pls. see navigation on HP for Collectors Maps.
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Fuzzy
If you want to try citric acid you can buy it labeled as "LemiShine" sold near dishwasher detergents in supermarkets.  It is much more expensive than buying it in bulk, but you can try it to see if you like it.  Around $4.00 per bottle, I think.
Chad

275 Appreciation Syndicate member #0244
Mil-Spec Syndicate #0244
Canadian Blues Member #27


Looking for birthday lanterns:  5/04, 6/06

Quality / Inexpensive / Quick - Normally you only get two

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GForceKaras
If you're patient then try molasses:



plus it works as rust inhibitor:

http://www.theijes.com/papers/v2-i1/BB02103460352.pdf
Thien TAS member #2750 / Sears Collectors Club #1
Looking for a Sears Ted Williams lantern (FOUND! Thanks Sean!)
"The dreams of youth are the regrets of maturity" - Darkness
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Dmacp
The nice thing about Evaporust is that the newly de-rusted metal does not seem to flash rust as bad as if I used a stronger remover. Even if I rinse it with water.  
Dan
ICCC member #604
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dpatten
Erwin,

You might be able to buy the industrial de-rusting solution.  It comes as a powder, so it shouldn't be a problem to ship it to Europe.
Dennis the Peasant

ICCC Member #1337 (Thanks Dean!)
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0086

"One of the sanest, surest, and most generous joys of life comes from being happy over the good fortune of others."
-R.A. Heinlein-
Quote
GreatWhiteNorth
I've been using Rust Check rust convertor, which contains phosphoric acid.  I sand the rust out best I can, and then scrub it out with that, go over it again with sandpaper, repeat.  Works well.
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Erwin

Hi again fellow de-rusters. ;-))
Based on all your comments and recommendations I read a lot of articles and watched several videos on YouTube about de-rusting.
It seems everybody has success with a different method. :-//
Before ordering Evaporust here in Germany I've tried another method which was recommended also.
I bought baking soda cheaply (pure Natriumhydrogencarbonate) and made a solution with a good concentration until the powder didn't dissolve anymore. Put the badly rusted collar of an AGM 3006 in and had it in the room to watch it. It was there for abt. a week and I've stirred it several times but it came out without much success. :-(((
I don't think it'll work for me any better.
The next thing I'm going to try is citric acid. I hope that'll work better.
Here some images of my unsuccessful trial.
Erwin.

agm3006_collar_01.jpg 
agm3006_collar_02.jpg 

My homepage: http://www.eschaefer.de
Pls. see navigation on HP for Collectors Maps.
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mnhogrider
Erwin, that collar is pretty pitted. Citric acid and hot water will probably work pretty good. You may have to soak it for a couple of days and re-heat the water several times mixed in with a few scrubbing sessions with a brass bristle brush.

Do you have access to a sand blasting cabinet? That would be the fastest and most effective.

Steve
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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curtludwig
I had to look up Natriumhydrogencarbonate, in English its sodium bicarbonate, NaHCO3.

I'm not surprised you didn't have much luck, its a very mild base at pH 8.4. 7 is neutral and sodium hydroxide (lye) is 13-14. It'll take something significantly more powerful to get much accomplished.

Going the other way citric acid has a pH of around 2.2...
Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
Quote
curtludwig
mnhogrider wrote:

Do you have access to a sand blasting cabinet? That would be the fastest and most effective.

Steve


Sand blasting is pretty aggressive for something with a stamping no? I don't have any experience with it but it seems like collars are pretty shallow stamps.
Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
Quote
WYSIWYG
Drop that collar in a jar with molasses and water for a few weeks. When you take it out the only signs of rust will be the pits that are left behind.

When you take it out it will be covered with a black film. Take it to the sink and brush it off under running water.

It won't be shiny but it won't be rusty either! If you want it shiny after that then polish it

This is the lowest cost, least destructive, safest method I have found. The only warning I have found is it will eat aluminum for some reason.


John        
One in every public place...

ICCC #1338    IDITOS  #2654
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0059
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #004
Member of CCF  Chromostereopsis  Club
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