200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

pongo
I have always wanted to give roasting a try.  Not bad. 

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Phil
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ctuan13
Hey great work!  Lookin good!
Chuck
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hikerduane
I've been wanting  a Primus roaster for grins and giggles.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves and lanterns, who's counting.
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SteveA
More information, please.  Is that a popcorn maker?  How high a flame?  How long did you roast the beans?  I'm interested because I've been told that raw coffee beans can be stored almost forever with out going bad, and that the coffee is WAY better if the beans are roasted just before you brew.
Anyone know anything about that?
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Pancholoco1911
Where do you get your raw coffee beans? I remember back in old Mexico when I was young my grandma used to roast coffee beans on top of the comal but that was like 30 years ago and in today's date you can't find them anymore for sale in Sinaloa Mexico. I know in southern states you can still buy coffee beans posted and raw and they are mainly for exportations purposes and not for national sales. I hate that Mexico is a Coffee producer and you can't buy coffee at our local wholesale markets AKA Mercado de abastos.

Here's a picture from a Pretil (in gringo Wood stove) I've downloaded from the web, I also asked my cousin to send me one picture from theirs.
~Pancho~
Looking for B-Day lantern 9/83, 7/85

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #101
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pongo
SteveA wrote:
More information, please.  Is that a popcorn maker?  How high a flame?  How long did you roast the beans?  I'm interested because I've been told that raw coffee beans can be stored almost forever with out going bad, and that the coffee is WAY better if the beans are roasted just before you brew.
Anyone know anything about that?


SteveA,
Yes, this is a popcorn popper. I used an oven thermometer that sat on the bottom of the popper. I let it preheat until it was around 350F. I used tongs to remove the thermometer. I used a low flame. I hit the first crack of the beans at about 8mins, and I continued for an additional 2mins after the first crack. I read that the coffee beans are good anytime after the first crack, depending on the roast you like. The crack sounds similar to popcorn. I made a cup with freshly roasted beans a few weeks ago. It was ok. I read that you can definitely drink it soon after the roast, but the body of the coffee develops a few days to a week later.  I noticed that the oils come out a few days after roasting and the beans off gas.

I used a floor fan outside to cool the beans and remove the chaff. The beans continue to roast, so cooling is needed.  In have heard that the green coffee beans do last a while.

It is fun, but a little awkward at first.  It definitely produces a bit of smoke and smells kind of like hay, not the aroma like when you brew a cup.
Phil
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scl
good job. i did that too and from my own indoor coffee plant. now waiting for the next batch of beans.
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pongo
ctuan13 wrote:
Hey great work!  Lookin good!

Thanks.
Phil
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pongo
scl wrote:
good job. i did that too and from my own indoor coffee plant. now waiting for the next batch of beans.
  Thank you.
Phil
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pongo
Where do you get your raw coffee beans? I remember back in old Mexico when I was young my grandma used to roast coffee beans on top of the comal but that was like 30 years ago and in today's date you can't find them anymore for sale in Sinaloa Mexico. I know in southern states you can still buy coffee beans posted and raw and they are mainly for exportations purposes and not for national sales. I hate that Mexico is a Coffee producer and you can't buy coffee at our local wholesale markets AKA Mercado de abastos.

Here's a picture from a Pretil (in gringo Wood stove) I've downloaded from the web, I also asked my cousin to send me one picture from theirs.


I found them from Nesco,but they got them from Burmam Coffee traders in Wisconsin. 
Phil
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SteveA
Thanks for the information!  I'm going to have to do some research,  see if I can find some raw beans and give it a try.

Thanks!
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pongo
SteveA wrote:
Thanks for the information!  I'm going to have to do some research,  see if I can find some raw beans and give it a try.

Thanks!



GREAT!
Phil
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pongo
Updated

I roasted about a half pound of Guatemalan Huehue this afternoon. I used a low flame on the 413. After 8mins, I pulled out the thermometer at 525F.

I hit the first crack at about 5 mins and roasted until 8mins. I had a bit too much beans in the popper; it was hard to crank at times.

This roast is a bit on the light side.

I would definitely recommend a 413 vs a 425; the 413 is heavier and doesn't move around like the 425 when cranking the popper.

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Phil
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