200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

mule81
Hello,

I'm somewhat new to the world of Coleman, and recently added a used 424 Dual Fuel stove to the stable.  I think it's about 10 years old.  The stove had a slow leak from the valve stem which was dripping fuel onto the grey tank.  Initially I tried tightening the compression nut, but was not able to get the leak to stop.  Thinking that maybe there was an O-Ring in there, I took the retaining nut and needle out to inspect.  When I started probing around in there I pretty much immediately destroyed the graphite packing, which came out in pieces.  Whoops.  Along with the graphite, my stove had two identical small brass rings on the shaft inside the nut.  They fell out along with the pieces of graphite and I'm not sure how exactly they were oriented.

I got everything cleaned up with some fine steel wool, sourced some new graphite packing, and tried to reassemble, and that's where I'm stuck.  I think that the little brass rings are supposed to sit on either side of the graphite packing, but no matter how I arrange those little rings I cannot seem to get the whole assembly into the generator far enough that the compression nut will thread onto the valve body.  I've tried fully closing the needle valve, and that doesn't seem to help.  I've searched this forum and found photos of other stove valves that use a little "c" clip and only one brass ring, but that is not the case here.  

The two little brass rings are identical, have one flat and one concave face, and measure about 0.1 inche thick.  The new graphite packing is 1/4" inside diameter, which fits perfectly on the brass shaft, and 3/8" long.  I've got several photos of everything, including how I've tried to reassemble it, at this link: https://photos.app.goo.gl/D6K7CzkSD7GSJM2SA

If anyone has some insight on how to reassemble this correctly I would very much appreciate it.  I doubt I bought the wrong packing because the one I have fits so well over the shaft, but I suppose it's possible.  Thanks in advance for your time!
Stoves:  Coleman 424 & Coleman 533
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Cottage_hill_bill
The small ring with the concave face goes with the concavity facing the split ring that is on the shaft. That keeps the ring from spreading open and letting things fall off the front of the shaft. Then the packing, then the wider ring. It does help to screw the valve completely closed when reassembling. Be sure to clean all the old packing out of the valve. With the valve clean and closed you should be able to slide the packing in enough to get the nut started. You can put your wrench behind the nut and tap gently to seat the packing just enough to get the nut started. Once you can get the first thread going on the nut, use the nut to finish seating the packing. I usually pull it down until the shaft won't turn, then back off a couple flats on the nut.
Reese
North West Florida

Reese’s Law of Thermodynamics:  At temperatures below incandescence hot metal looks exactly like cold metal.

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brucesheehe
Perfect explanation!
Bruce Sheehe
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
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mule81
Gentlemen,

Thank you for the explanation.  I got it back together tonight and just performed a successful run test on the stove with no leaks!  Part of my problem was that the first ring was not quite seating in the brass bore of the valve body.  I used a 5/16" deep socket as a "driver" along with a small tack hammer to get it seated in the bore.  Even with the first brass ring (concavity forward) fully seated in its bore I wasn't quite able to get the compression nut to catch its first thread.  I tried tapping on the wrench but wasn't able to get it to move forward any more.  I ended up using a file to take about 1/16" of length off the packing cylinder.  Once I shaved it down just a tad, everything went together beautifully.  Tightened it until the knob was hard to turn, then backed off 2 wrench flats and all is well.  Should be good for many years now, and I've got a couple spare packings for next time.  Thanks again for the help.
Stoves:  Coleman 424 & Coleman 533
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Cottage_hill_bill
If you have to drive the ring into the valve, something is wrong and you need to stop and find the problem. My first guess would be that the inside of the valve wasn't clean. Old packing can stick to the inside of the valve and the inside of the nut and cause problems.
Reese
North West Florida

Reese’s Law of Thermodynamics:  At temperatures below incandescence hot metal looks exactly like cold metal.

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mule81
The valve was and inside of the nut were scrupulously cleaned with alcohol/Qtip/steel wool/wire brush before any reassembly began... probably the cleanest they have ever been or ever will be.  A bronze rifle bore brush turned in the hand did a good job of clearing the tiny particles of old packing from the threads of the nut.  When I tried to reassemble, I found that the small brass ring had a little deformed burr on the outer edge, which was causing it to catch on the valve body and preventing it from going into the bore.  I cleaned it up with a bit of fine sandpaper as best I could and got it together.  I've searched through dozens of posts on the web on this topic and always see photos of valves having little "c" clips on them, which mine does not have. I think I've got it together correctly now as it's working properly with no leaks, but it was certainly more difficult than it should have been. 
Stoves:  Coleman 424 & Coleman 533
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