200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

tshells1
I did a search and couldn't find anything relating to this, so here is my question.

Has anyone ever removed a swaged (crimped) bail from a modern Coleman vent like a 290? It has the bushings that insert into the vent and then the bail is inserted and swaged so it cant come out.

My reason for wanting to remove the bail is it is rusted near where it inserts while the rest of the lantern is nearly perfect. I want to steel wool it and put it back. My other option would be to Dremel brush it as much as possible but I fear of a slip in those tight quarters and causing other damage.

Is it possible to un-swage to remove it and the swage it back when complete. I fear that swage-cycling it a second or third time from the original would stress the metal and cause it to crack or break.

Any thoughts or experience with this would be appreciated.
FloridaTom
There is a very fine line between hobby and obsession.
ICCC# 1196
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0039    Ebay handle - tshells1

WTB/WTT - Need a 222 GREEN Vent - have a black one for trade or will purchase outright, Also looking for a 249 fount.
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Rustytank
I would dremel the swaged part on the inside where it has expanded to keep it from slipping out. Not the entire flat part, just where it prevents it from coming out. To reinstall I'd get some cable stops like the ones linked below to re secure the bail in the absence of the swaging.
https://www.littleshopmfg.com/parking-brake-cable-stops-for-dbc-kits/

I've never used that brand on a lantern but I use a very similar stop on my old engines for various linkage. True Value Hardware and Oreilly auto parts are a good place to look locally. 
275 Appreciation Syndicate #0245
Looking for birthday lanterns 11/58, 3/68, 3/73, 11/96, 6/97, 11/97, 12/00
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Gunhippie
That's a good solution for the tool-challenged. I'd grind/file the "wings" off, then cross-bore the bail ends for a 1/16" cotter pin like the later 220Bs.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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JimL
Have you tried soaking in citric or using Evaporust?  I don't think either would hurt the porcelain, but perhaps someone else could confirm.  There's also the option of wetting a paper towel with either and wrapping that area.  Either re-wet as it dries or perhaps cover with tape or put into a large baggie to keep it from drying while it's working.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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Tigerfans2
I use evapo on vents with rusty spots, turn out nice methinks
Coleman Slant Saver #58
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #8
Coleman Blues 243's #16
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Gunhippie
My experience with acids and porcelain is BAD. I have a very nice 228B vent that is now permanently fogged from about 30 seconds in dilute phos acid.

I think some lime/rust removers for use on porcelain surfaces use oxalic acid, but I haven't tested it on a vent yet. Once bitten, twice shy.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Cottage_hill_bill
Gunhippie has it right. Use a small stone, like the chainsaw sharpening stone in a Dremel, grind the wings off enough for the bail to slide through the hole. Cross drill the ends of the bail and use small cotter pins to keep the bail in place afterwards. I've done about half a dozen 220s that way for the same reason you're wanting to do it. Cotter pins are what held the early model bails in place, swaging was just a cheaper method.
Reese
North West Florida

Reese’s Law of Thermodynamics:  At temperatures below incandescence hot metal looks exactly like cold metal.

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tshells1
Thanks everyone for your responses. I like Gunhippie's suggestion and Reese confirms. I know I can handle it so I'll go that route. Maybe in a couple of days after Christmas has settled down and I've made the fix, I'll post some pics. Thanks again.
FloridaTom
There is a very fine line between hobby and obsession.
ICCC# 1196
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0039    Ebay handle - tshells1

WTB/WTT - Need a 222 GREEN Vent - have a black one for trade or will purchase outright, Also looking for a 249 fount.
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tshells1
20191224_230054a.jpg  A little crude for a first attempt but it was the right way to go. I did drill the holes before grinding off the sides because I knew it would give me a better chance at drilling them properly with more material there. Now to steel wool and re-install with very small cotter pins. Thanks Gunhippie and Reese!
FloridaTom
There is a very fine line between hobby and obsession.
ICCC# 1196
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0039    Ebay handle - tshells1

WTB/WTT - Need a 222 GREEN Vent - have a black one for trade or will purchase outright, Also looking for a 249 fount.
Quote
MYN
Gunhippie wrote:
My experience with acids and porcelain is BAD. I have a very nice 228B vent that is now permanently fogged from about 30 seconds in dilute phos acid.

I think some lime/rust removers for use on porcelain surfaces use oxalic acid, but I haven't tested it on a vent yet. Once bitten, twice shy.


All acids would eventually corrode and fog up the vitreous enamel on the hood.
I've had a bad experience almost the exact as you.
Following that, I've deliberately bought a couple of cheap enamelled steel mugs just for testing with various acids, highly diluted but would still remove rust:- acetic, citric and oxalic(barkeeper's friend). Besides the acids, I also tried some sodium citrate solution(Preston Super Radiator Cleaner) and Sodium hydrogen sulfite/sodium bisulfite(Rust Out).
All of them would fog the enamel if left on for long enough to remove the rust.
Perhaps only Evaporust wouldn't harm it but I've not tried that as I couldn't find any.
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Gunhippie
Thanks for confirming that, Mark. You've saved me some time!

Interesting that  you tried Sodium citrate. A few years back, we had a small grease fire in the pub kitchen. One of our employees over-reacted and popped the kitchen wet-chem FX. It didn't make much of a mess, but completely removed all rust and the season on our flat-top. It was just shiny metal the next morning when I checked it. The wet chemical in this FX is Potassium citrate. I have a discarded dry chem FX full of it and have been meaning to experiment with it for rust removal--and maybe use the tank as a franken fount afterwards.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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tshells1
Final pic. Bail has been removed, cleaned up and replaced with cotter pins added.

20191225_213854a.jpg 
Thanks again for the great idea.
FloridaTom
There is a very fine line between hobby and obsession.
ICCC# 1196
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0039    Ebay handle - tshells1

WTB/WTT - Need a 222 GREEN Vent - have a black one for trade or will purchase outright, Also looking for a 249 fount.
Quote
Gunhippie
Well executed!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
MYN
Gunhippie wrote:
Thanks for confirming that, Mark. You've saved me some time!

Interesting that  you tried Sodium citrate. A few years back, we had a small grease fire in the pub kitchen. One of our employees over-reacted and popped the kitchen wet-chem FX. It didn't make much of a mess, but completely removed all rust and the season on our flat-top. It was just shiny metal the next morning when I checked it. The wet chemical in this FX is Potassium citrate. I have a discarded dry chem FX full of it and have been meaning to experiment with it for rust removal--and maybe use the tank as a franken fount afterwards.

It was not deliberate with the sodium citrate. I was actually looking for the least aggresive substance that wouldn't harm porcelain enamel. I was browsing through the shelves, looking for some corrosion inhibiting stuffs(not for the purpose here) on the market and happened to chance upon the Preston product which contains sodium citrate. I understand its not acidic. I reckoned that it might somehow be useful and bought a bottle.
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