200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

DarkmanDrew
Hi All,

I started researching the history behind old Coleman stoves and before I knew it, I now own 6x different Coleman 421 models. I plan on restoring as many as I can.

I was wondering what I should be doing to start? Best practices? Some stove cases have slight bends in them. Ways to bend things back with minimal damage. Best solutions to use for cleaning etc internal burners etc. Cleaning rusted grills and burners? Should rust inhibitors be used to prevent future rust? Sorry for all the questions right off the bat.
Sincerely,

Andrew J. Dunowski
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Jayhawksr

Welcome to the forum, you’ve come to the place. I’ll let the more knowledgeable “stovies” chime in but I suggest you check out the Lantern Lab channel on YouTube. The guy is member here and his videoSare really good. I know he as one on doing suitcase stove rebuild. I don’t remember the model but the general concepts are the same. 


Good luck and have fun!

Richard (KC native and KU Alumni living in Maryland)
Rock Chalk, Jayhawk. Go KU!
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1983.  Coleman Quick-lite Crew #36.
Mil Spec Syndicate #1983
Eagle Scout Class of '83
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Kgam1020
Welcome from western Massachusetts. You definitely came to the right place. If you search for a thread, 426D Before and after. That is the thread for my stove I restored. I know a lot of guys use auto body tools to remove dents in the lids or case of a stove. I used different wire wheels on my drill to remove rust and my orbital sander on the flat surfaces. VHT paint on anything that is near heat or open flame. The list goes on and on. If taking apart the burners, be careful of the orientation of the rings so your flame is even when put back together. Good luck on your project and don’t hesitate to ask questions. 
Ken.
Looking for Bday lanterns, 10/83, 11/84 and 10/2011.
Milspec Syndicate member #1020 
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Barrett
Hello and welcome from NZ 

Great to have another Stovie join the fun🙂
Plenty of info to be found if you look around and I'm sure some of the craftsmen will be along soon and will happily share their experience and skills.

Andrew

Living and learning in NZ
Hoping to reach cognitive and emotional maturity before my children do.
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outlawmws

Welcome to CCF!

As mentioned, body tools like planishing hammers and dollies work well.

If working with something you can get a couple of 2X4's on either side and clamp with C-Clamps,  you can put one of the 2X's on something solid and wail on the top 2X with a heavy hammer.  This avoids hammer marks.

For edge work, once the main whoopees are basically gone, I use the homemade tongs below to iron out those annoying kinks and ripples (I do a lot of tool box restoration and these are my most used metal bending tool)  Just Squeeze hard, and the kinks are gone.  Almost magic.  Originally they were for bending small tabs and the like and the angle provided something to tap against with a sheet metal hammer.  I've never seen this type of tong actually for sale. 

I made these from destroyed nippers (None done in by me...  One I bought already mangled, the other was courtesy of a loan, and they came back wiped out - "but you can sharpen them right?"  - Um, No...), and notched the angle to get the jaws in all the way.  This make the fulcrum of the tongs very close to the pad so you can apply a LOT of pressure.  Ordinary sheet metal tongs can't do this.  The tips are too far away from the fulcrum.  You might get close if you get the more expensive compound tongs (based on aviation ships)
bending Tongs.jpg 

[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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DarkmanDrew
outlawmws wrote:

If working with something you can get a couple of 2X4's on either side and clamp with C-Clamps,  you can put one of the 2X's on something solid and wail on the top 2X with a heavy hammer.  This avoids hammer marks.



I'm trying to understand what you mean with the 2x4s exactly, can you post a pic or diagram? One of the boxes I have must have had something heavy on it as it's drooping in the middle causing the ends to go up a little. There's a little whoopie on the right side. It almost seems common as I have another one with the same bend in the lid. https:// drive.google.com/file/d/1FhDyURm2AJ8r91r1JnTQ2CCXylfcb0jB/view?usp=drivesdk
 

Sincerely,

Andrew J. Dunowski
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Kgam1020
Cut a couple pieces of a 2x4 chunks. ( framing lumber ) Put a piece below and one over the area that is dented and tap the block of wood with your hammer. It will flatten the damaged area. You might have to move them around a little to achieve the result you want. I had to do this on the top of my 426D I restored and you can't tell there was a small dent. 
Ken.
Looking for Bday lanterns, 10/83, 11/84 and 10/2011.
Milspec Syndicate member #1020 
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DarkmanDrew
So let me get this straight, I could take the top lid off and the wind baffles, and cut a 2x4 maybe a little shorter than the lid so the lips of the lid just go over it on each side so it's flush with the bottom of the lid, then cut one for the top so the bent portion of the lid is sandwiched in the middle between the two 2x4s. Then tapping the top 2x4 until I get the desired result? Sorry for being so green behind the gills, but I just want to do this right.
Sincerely,

Andrew J. Dunowski
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Kgam1020
Yup pretty much lol, the wood blocks will prevent dents from your hammer and flatten out the “dent” your trying to remove. 
Ken.
Looking for Bday lanterns, 10/83, 11/84 and 10/2011.
Milspec Syndicate member #1020 
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DarkmanDrew
I tried to work on the Coleman Stove case today but unfortunately the case is a little warped. When I straighten out the bend in the  front, the whoopie appears at the front, when I flatten the whoopie the bend appears again. Looks like I need a professional metal worker lol I decided to start on cleaning the burner system.
Sincerely,

Andrew J. Dunowski
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