200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

WoodTechPeterson
        My March 2020 model 639's inaugural firing yielded dark spots on the mantle and less light than my March 1966 model 200A.  I've been advised to check the air tubes because dark spots are indicative of too much fuel or not enough air.  I'll certainly make sure they are clear.

        When I tried to adjust the lantern to maximum output the mantle became engulfed in flames, so I dialed it back to stop the fireball.  Is that further indication of the mantle needing more air?

        How much pressure do these lanterns like?  I was taught long ago to pump up a Coleman until I feared snapping my thumb.  I've now seen on a gauge that my thumb can do about 70 PSI and I had pumped the daylights out of this lantern.  Is that a good pressure?  I can do more by bicycle pump if these models like a lot of pressure.

        In general; how do I go about getting the most light out of my 639?  Should I use CF instead of kerosene?

Thanks All,
Matthew A. Peterson
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JimL
That may be a sign of not enough preheat.

I was not aware a lantern pump could go more than 30-40 PSI, based on testing from a member here a few years ago.  Anyway, how much fuel did you put in?  70 pumps with a low fount of fuel may be equivalent to 20 pumps with a mostly full fount.   Regardless, you should not need a lot of pressure. 

What I suggest is to look at the seams for the burner, and apply muffler cement to any gaps you see.  A good way to detect them is to have the vent and globe off when lighting to see if you see any smoke coming from any of the seams.  You can just light it and turn it back off.  Any smoke will be visible upon lightup.  You don't want to run it without the globe and vent in place because the generator will cool too much, leading to flames like you describe.

Although 'adjustable', you only want to run it wide open when running kerosene.  Kerosene needs lots of heat to continue vaporizing.  If you turn it down when running kerosene, you will only do this once.  🙂

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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Chucker
Hello again Matthew, good questions. 

It was designed for kero so maximum candle power will come from kero not typically Coleman fuel. 

I still say you may have a generator tip that needs tightening -slightly. Don't go gorilla on it and you should be fine.

Also, these do need 3-4 minutes to get up to temp so give it time. They will fireball if the gen and burner assy is not up to temp and you try to crank it wide open too soon.

30 pumps should be plenty. Frankly I use maybe 20 pumps to start it then as it gets up to temp add another 20 if it'll take it. So, the opposite of what you are doing I suppose.

I carry a 639 in my Jeep 24/7 too.  

Others will have their take on it and chime in soon. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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WoodTechPeterson
Yikes, I pumped a full fount of fuel ≈ 300 times over several hours before sundown, that was yesterday and my thumb still hurts.  Can too much pressure cause problems?
  • Check the generator tip for snugness
  • check the air tubes for obstructions inside
  • go over the air tube seam lines with exhaust pipe sealer
  • anything else?
Matthew A. Peterson
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Chucker
Yes, pressure can change the rate of flow thereby forcing more fuel than is necessary before it is properly warmed up. The generator orifice meters the fuel but yes, pressure can make a difference. 

Think of a muzzle loader with 300 grains of powder when 150 is called for. Check the snow in front of your rifle and you will find plenty of unfired powder (flare up on a lantern).
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Deanofid
Did you preheat the generator?
Also, when you fueled it up, did you tip the lantern sideways a bit to try to get the most fuel in?
BTW, these will run fine on 30-40 pumps, as the directions say.  Put in more after the lantern is warmed up and running bright if you want.
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
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WoodTechPeterson
      I fueled up the lantern level and pre-heated the generator but only with the alcohol cup as opposed to a blowtorch.  I'm going to try the lantern again tomorrow night without so much pressure in it.
Matthew A. Peterson
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Gavercronos
            When I tried to adjust the lantern to maximum output the mantle became engulfed in flames, so I dialed it back to stop the fireball.


Tells me you were trying to run it with the valve half open. Kerosene lanterns aren't very happy with that state of affairs. It had dark spots to begin because you were starving it of fuel, then it fireballed because it wasn't staying hot enough. Next time get it good and hot, then open it up all the way.
WillCat

Chautauqua County, New York
Slant Saver [svg] Frank MakerNew York State Route 5 marker

Wanted: GPA dated 5/89 (Red 286?  Black Powerhouse? 508? Early Unleadeds? Canadian things? I'll settle for a propane job at this point) Vintage Sunbeam Mixmaster bowls and accessories, Ruby-cased 10in lamp shade, 7D Mag-lite
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Rustytank

@WoodTechPeterson
Do you have dyed kerosene or clear kerosene? Dyed kerosene will cause the described problem. If using dyed kero find some clear.
If using clear try this, it's called a soft start:
1) Start with the fount full to the bottom of the collar for the fuel filler. 2) Tighten the fuel cap.
3) Fill the preheat cup with alcohol
4) Light the alcohol and let it burn until it is almost gone.
5) Open the valve all the way. 
6) Pump the lantern 10 times. The mantle should light up during this.
7) Once the lantern settles in a bit give it about 10 more pumps and evaluate it. Mine like about 20 pumps of pressure. I've tried pumping more but I don't seem to see any gain after 20 or so.
Let the lantern run and the black spots will slowly burn off if your fuel and air mix is right.

You may also have bad kerosene. Never use a plastic jug to store it.
Try fresh kerosene.
275 Appreciation Syndicate #0245
Looking for birthday lanterns 11/58, 3/68, 3/73, 11/96, 6/97, 11/97, 12/00
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Chucker
+1 ^^^ on a Soft Start. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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WoodTechPeterson
never got to trying it last night so I'll try it in broad daylight today.  I leave for camping tomorrow and really want to use this new toy of mine.  This makes a dozen lanterns in my fleet, think I may be developing a problem.
Matthew A. Peterson
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74HARLEY
Good morning Matthew! I definitely see a problem here, you only have a dozen lanterns? No wonder you can't sleep at night!
Joe
looking for 200a 11-56,9-77,2-65 Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #0004 ICCC #1262
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #19
Frank appreciation syndicate member #9
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WoodTechPeterson
I miscounted, there are 13 including my pair of Dietz Air Pilots.  Some of my model 200A's, 220's and a 285 are intended for overhaul and resale though.  Wifey Girl isn't too happy about it when a new one arrives, need to sell some before I order a 295 and a northstar.
Matthew A. Peterson
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My Name Is Earl
#1 problem
Wify Girl doesnt need to know
 
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Chucker
@WoodTechPeterson, Matthew, you might ask her, "How many pairs of shoes are too many?" or "How many purses can one own until you have, too many?" Just sayin. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
Quote


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