200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
Judamonster
Twice now I have over ranked the burner assemblies on a restore. A nickel 200 and a 234. Both times with yellow tape and turning it by hand. Like fount in one hand and assembly in the other. Anyone else have similar experiences. It's almost like the tape makes it too easy to put in. I was to back them off to get the collars on (and use more tape)
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JimL
That's why I stopped using Teflon tape.  I now use Permatex blue thread locker.  You can now switch to a thread locker to hold it in the right place or tin the threads with solder.  Tinning the threads will give a good seal, but don't expect it to remain firmly seated like before.  The above are what I do, but I'm sure there will be more suggestions. 

-Jim

Have you ever imagined a world with no hypothetical situations?
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5fivesix
There's a lot of good thread sealants out there.Blue thread locker is good stuff I use it and permatex #2 or Dirko engine sealant.#2 is a soft set sealant and can be removed fairly easy after repeated heating and use it will harden a bit.Dirko is what's used on stihl power equipment and alot of other things in place of a gasket .
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Tigerfans2
In the past I've posted about placing a piece of blue painter's tape on the fount vertically inline with the valve stem and then counting the revolutions as I unscrewed the assembly. But I'm just anal so...😏
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Gunhippie
I use LocTite 542 thread sealer/locker. Great stuff.

I will turn the valve--the burner assembly is the part that goes above the valve--by hand until I fell resistance, then fit the collar to see ow much I have to go. If the valve feels tight in the fount, but still just a little high in the collar opening, I leave it there. The tapered threads wear and the female threads stretch every time you tighten them, so you will eventually have the valve sitting too low in the collar if you aren't careful. Id rather live with it a little high and know it has many more fettles before it becomes a problem.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Dmacp
Loctite and Permatex make an anaerobic  thread sealer that works very well for that. It's a sealant, not a thread locker. Teflon does make it very easy to overtighten, and the pipe thread expands the threads quite easily.
Dan
ICCC member #604
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Gunhippie
Well, the LocTite 542 doesn't say "thread locker" on the bottle, but the description says that it "prevents loosening due to vibration" and I can attest it does a pretty good job of locking the threads. I use it for most all non-product-contact thread sealing and locking around the brewery. It's pretty handy when installing a gauge that needs to face a particular direction, when tightening fully would put it in the wrong orientation. While it says it's for "fine threads", it works great on regular NPT plumbing threads, too.

https://www.henkel-adhesives.com/us/en/product/thread-sealants/loctite_542.html
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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5fivesix
Loctite and permatex both make great products.Usualy tapered brass to brass connection really doesn't require any sealant as long as the threads are decent shape.Id say put the valve in by hand till you feel some resistance fit the collar see how it fits remove put whatever flavor sealant you choose tighten one turn to where it needs to be and leak check
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zoomkat
I'd use a sealant instead of a thread locker. Different products for different uses. Usually sealants are tolerant of non super tight fits, and stay somewhat liquid to keep nooks and crannies filled when parts move due to thermal expansion/contraction.  
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NWMike
I used loctite 542 and 545 for threads on lines when servicing photo processors.  Most of the fittings run from fine to medium in thread pitch.  Good stuff, didn't have to worry about reactions with the chemistry going thru the lines and no cussing, marred fittings, or scrapped knuckles the next time things got disassembled.  I wouldn't hesitate to use it on a lantern or stove, although permatex form-a-gasket #2 works just fine for me and it looks like a long time before I'm going to run out.  Where high temperatures have been present, I've had good luck, (so far), with both copper and nickel anti seize.  
I like to index or clock the parts I'm reinstalling or replacing as close to the same position they were in the last time the piece was working the way it should.
Something that will fill any potential gaps between worn threads has worked well for me so far.
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