200A and 202 reproduction
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Big Jim Mac
Had to try out my Coleman oven today, so I whipped together some Bisquick biscuits and fired it up on a modern propane stove. Figured I better do it outside since this was the maiden journey for the stove and I figured it would smoke. Good call, its last meal burned off for a long time. The only pan I have that will fit inside is a small casserole dish. I could only get four biscuits inside. Recipe calls for 7 minutes at 450 degrees. Don't think the temp got that high as it was really cold and windy outside. I let it go for about 12 minutes. Results were pretty good. I rolled them a little thin or they would have been fluffier. Should have rotated the pan, one was a little dark on the bottom. So proof of concept. Ready for spring and some camping! IMG_0148.jpg  IMG_3082.jpg  IMG_6334.jpg 
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TwoCanoes
Looks good!  And that's without a pizza stone or any such thing in the oven?
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Big Jim Mac
Yes just put the pan in and let her heat. I think the thermometer on the door eventually got to 250, but I don't put much faith in that.
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Lhoffm4coleman
Just add some sausage gravy and scrambled eggs and you have a gourmet breakfast!
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Gasman64
Those biscuits look fine to me...and Lhoffm4coleman has a very good idea above..[sSig_iagree]
Steve
ICCC #1012

logoballistol logo 1a.png

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Big Jim Mac
I need to try this again now that it is warming up some. And yes some eggs and sausage gravy would be wonderful!
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Lhoffm4coleman
I bought 2x 8in. round pizza stones online cheap for my Coleman oven.  Since they came in a two-pack, I also sourced a second grill rack, which allowed me the ability to double my cooking space inside it.  For some strange reason the oven had two sets of holes for the internal rack.  I’m guessing to allow one to move the pan to be further from the flame?  Anyhow, the use of two stones seems to reduce the instances of burning what ever I am baking as well as stabilize the heat inside the oven.  I also threw a bbq “internal” thermometer with a probe inside so I could more accurately track internal cooking temps.  The thermometer on the door, in my oven was within 10 degrees of the probed temps of the second thermometer.  Happy cooking/baking!
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isubando
Personally, I use some small stainless steel baking trays I got off Amazon.  They're 7"x9"x1", and fit well into the oven.  They also travel well and survive the boy scout campouts with my son's scout troop.  I've wanted to try the pizza stone/brick approach to helping stabilize the temperature and avoid hot spots like Lhoffm4coleman.  However, I was able to get some good refrigerator biscuits out of my Coleman oven on a campout last fall without the stones.  The bottoms were a little darker than I would have liked, so I'm motivated to hunt down a good little stone to put in there.

Out of curiosity Lhoffm4coleman, how did you source a second rack for the oven?  Did you have another oven and just borrowed the rack out of there?  Or, did you improvise something or purchase another one from somewhere?  I too would like to take advantage of two racks in the space if I can.

BakingPan.jpg 
And for what it's worth, here's the link to the tray on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MRGJYOW/
Jeff
ICCC #1924
Coleman Slant Saver #69
BernzOMatic Appreciation Club #68
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Lhoffm4coleman
isubando wrote:
Personally, I use some small stainless steel baking trays I got off Amazon.  They're 7"x9"x1", and fit well into the oven.  They also travel well and survive the boy scout campouts with my son's scout troop.  I've wanted to try the pizza stone/brick approach to helping stabilize the temperature and avoid hot spots like Lhoffm4coleman.  However, I was able to get some good refrigerator biscuits out of my Coleman oven on a campout last fall without the stones.  The bottoms were a little darker than I would have liked, so I'm motivated to hunt down a good little stone to put in there.

Out of curiosity Lhoffm4coleman, how did you source a second rack for the oven?  Did you have another oven and just borrowed the rack out of there?  Or, did you improvise something or purchase another one from somewhere?  I too would like to take advantage of two racks in the space if I can.

BakingPan.jpg 
And for what it's worth, here's the link to the tray on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MRGJYOW/
isubando wrote:
Personally, I use some small stainless steel baking trays I got off Amazon.  They're 7"x9"x1", and fit well into the oven.  They also travel well and survive the boy scout campouts with my son's scout troop.  I've wanted to try the pizza stone/brick approach to helping stabilize the temperature and avoid hot spots like Lhoffm4coleman.  However, I was able to get some good refrigerator biscuits out of my Coleman oven on a campout last fall without the stones.  The bottoms were a little darker than I would have liked, so I'm motivated to hunt down a good little stone to put in there.

Out of curiosity Lhoffm4coleman, how did you source a second rack for the oven?  Did you have another oven and just borrowed the rack out of there?  Or, did you improvise something or purchase another one from somewhere?  I too would like to take advantage of two racks in the space if I can.

BakingPan.jpg 
And for what it's worth, here's the link to the tray on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MRGJYOW/


I found a second oven at a yard sale for cheap and borrowed its rack to put into my first oven.  
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isubando
Thanks for the info.  I had acquired yet another stove a while back, but that one didn't have a rack, so I'm also on the hunt for a good solution for that.
Jeff
ICCC #1924
Coleman Slant Saver #69
BernzOMatic Appreciation Club #68
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Gojoe
Biscuits
Bakewell Cream is the answer you seek when it comes to the best camp biscuits. It's available online, an old New England favorite. Those who make them in camp will have their praises sung throughout the ages.
Trick or trout! Anybody got a fish?
Just how big is Aroostook County anyway??
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isubando
Hadn't heard about Bakewell Cream biscuits.  Thanks for the suggestion.  Found a recipe and source for purchasing the Bakewell Cream leavener on the King Arthur Four site:
     https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/recipes/bakewell-cream-biscuits-recipe

Now I'm intrigued enough to buy some Bakewell Cream and give this a try.  Looks like my family will do a "stay-cation" this year, so I'll have to take some pics to let folks know how they turn out.
Jeff
ICCC #1924
Coleman Slant Saver #69
BernzOMatic Appreciation Club #68
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Gojoe
Follow the instructions on the can.. I've made them with canned and powdered milk with good results. The best biscuits are made with real lard, shortening is passable but use lard if you can, and make sure the milk is cold. 
Don't fuss with the dough. Just mix, cut, cook.
Cheers
Trick or trout! Anybody got a fish?
Just how big is Aroostook County anyway??
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isubando
Made some Bakewell Cream biscuits tonight.  Very easy to make and bake, and the family loved them.  They puffed up nicely and were very light in our standard oven.  Once the rain finely stops around here, I'll give it a try in my Coleman oven.  I have a couple different types of ovens, so might have to try some in each one to see how the baking differs across the three models.  Thanks for the great suggestion Gojoe!
BakewellCreamBiscuit_02.jpg 
Jeff
ICCC #1924
Coleman Slant Saver #69
BernzOMatic Appreciation Club #68
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Gojoe
  • Very, very nice looking biscuits! Easy wasn't it! The next day, left over biscuit are great buttered lightly and fried on a cast iron griddle.
Now wait and try them in strawberry short cake!
Trick or trout! Anybody got a fish?
Just how big is Aroostook County anyway??
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Gasman64
Tim (Gojoe) , thanks for the recommendation for the Bakewell biscuits; they look and sound great. (Thanks to Jeff for the picture, too.)
Steve
ICCC #1012

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isubando
I broke out my camping ovens today and gave them all a try baking these Bakewell Cream biscuits.  I made one batch of dough and split it across all the ovens.  And to keep a control set, I did some in our conventional oven as well.  Here's my oven setup:
TestSetup.jpg 
In general, my results are:

Conventional Oven - I was able to follow the recipe instructions exactly, and the biscuits came out perfectly and quickly.
ConventionalOven.jpg 

Camp Chef Oven
- Oven had a hard time reaching temperature (could only get to ~425-450 instead of the recipe 475).  Had to keep the biscuits in the oven longer in order to get the tops to brown.  Extra challenge to not burn bottoms.
CampChefOven.jpg 

Diamond Logo Oven & 426B Stove - Stove/oven combination had a very hard time reaching temperature (could only get to ~400).  Had to keep the biscuits in the oven longer in order to get the tops to brown even slightly.  Overall, I actually prefer the lighter/blond biscuits, so this setup worked well in my opinion even if it took a bit longer than expected.
DiamondLogo.jpg 

Late 60's Oven & 425 Stove
- Stove/oven combination had a very hard time reaching temperature (could only get to ~350-375).  Had to keep the biscuits in the oven a lot longer to get the tops to brown even slightly.  This setup was workable, but if the weather was cold, it probably wouldn't have worked.
Late60sOven.jpg 
Jeff
ICCC #1924
Coleman Slant Saver #69
BernzOMatic Appreciation Club #68
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Gasman64
Interesting results, Jeff, thank you for the pictures and detailed descriptions of the whole biscuit baking experiment.
[sSig_thankyou]
Steve
ICCC #1012

logoballistol logo 1a.png

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Kgam1020
Wow impressive for sure. Now you need some butter! 
Ken.
Looking for Bday lanterns, 10/83, 11/84 and 10/2011.
Milspec Syndicate member #1020 
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Majicwrench
Looks like fun!

Surprised you had a hard time getting up to temp. What was the temp??  I don't recall temp being a problem on the 413 that lives on my porch.
Keith
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isubando
I'll admit that my stoves may not be operating at peak efficiency and may need some maintenance.  Most baking recipes call for ~350 oven temperature.  All of these setups could meet and maintain this temperature.  However, this particular biscuit recipe calls for 475 which is a relatively high temperature for baking.  Most home ovens only go to 500, so nearly at that maximum.  The rub is that the hotter these camp ovens get, the faster the heat dissipates.  So, if the stoves can't pump more heat into the oven than is dissipating, the temp basically maxes at the equilibrium point. Your 413 probably runs better than my little beaters. 
Jeff
ICCC #1924
Coleman Slant Saver #69
BernzOMatic Appreciation Club #68
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Majicwrench
Did bread on the 413  yesterday, had to really keep it turned down to keep it at or below 350. Turned it up for just a minute and it quickly climbed over 400. I don't think I would have any problem hitting 500 deg.
Keith
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Gojoe
isubando wrote:
I broke out my camping ovens today and gave them all a try baking these Bakewell Cream biscuits.  I made one batch of dough and split it across all the ovens.  And to keep a control set, I did some in our conventional oven as well.  Here's my oven setup:
TestSetup.jpg 
In general, my results are:

Conventional Oven - I was able to follow the recipe instructions exactly, and the biscuits came out perfectly and quickly.
ConventionalOven.jpg 

Camp Chef Oven
- Oven had a hard time reaching temperature (could only get to ~425-450 instead of the recipe 475).  Had to keep the biscuits in the oven longer in order to get the tops to brown.  Extra challenge to not burn bottoms.
CampChefOven.jpg 

Diamond Logo Oven & 426B Stove - Stove/oven combination had a very hard time reaching temperature (could only get to ~400).  Had to keep the biscuits in the oven longer in order to get the tops to brown even slightly.  Overall, I actually prefer the lighter/blond biscuits, so this setup worked well in my opinion even if it took a bit longer than expected.
DiamondLogo.jpg 

Late 60's Oven & 425 Stove
- Stove/oven combination had a very hard time reaching temperature (could only get to ~350-375).  Had to keep the biscuits in the oven a lot longer to get the tops to brown even slightly.  This setup was workable, but if the weather was cold, it probably wouldn't have worked.
Late60sOven.jpg 
Trick or trout! Anybody got a fish?
Just how big is Aroostook County anyway??
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Gojoe
When you say extra time, what are we talking?
Trick or trout! Anybody got a fish?
Just how big is Aroostook County anyway??
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isubando
The recipe states to bake at 475 for 5 minutes, turn off the oven, and bake for 5 to 10 minutes more using the residual heat until the biscuits are a golden brown.  For those last 5 to 10 minutes, the baking is the result primarily of air heat (air to biscuit conduction since my oven doesn't have forced air convection) and radiant heat from the oven surfaces. 

For my camping ovens/stoves, the air temperature wasn't getting up to 475, and therefore, the oven surfaces weren't getting to 475 either for good radiant heat.  With the high heat loss from the ovens, my approach was to not turn off the heat in any of the ovens.  I did turn down the burners so that the heat on the bottom wasn't going to burn the bottoms, but I didn't turn any of them completely off like I did with our standard home oven.  It was a watch-and-see approach, but in general, the times were:

Conventional Oven - 5 minutes with the oven on and 5 minutes off = total ~10 minutes
Camp Chef Oven - 5 minutes with the oven on full and around 12 minutes adjusting lower burner levels = total ~17 minutes
Diamond Logo Oven & 426B Stove - 5 minutes with the stove burner on full and around 15 minutes at nearly full level = total ~20 minutes
Late 60's Oven & 425 Stove - 20+ minutes with the stove burner on full = total over 20 minutes
Jeff
ICCC #1924
Coleman Slant Saver #69
BernzOMatic Appreciation Club #68
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