200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

bngreenchev
DSC00340_DxO.jpg  DSC00343_DxO copy.jpg  DSC00352_DxO copy.jpg  DSC00353_DxO copy.jpg  DSC00359_DxO copy.jpg  DSC00365_DxO.jpg
Thought I would share my pics of Neowise with you all.
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1hpycmpr
Nice picture, Robert and thanks for sharing.  What was your setup?
Mark
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liteitup
Very cool, thank you for sharing,
Lee
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JimL
Awesome, thanks!

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


There is a very fine line between hobby and mental illness. - Dave Barry
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bngreenchev
1hpycmpr wrote:
Nice picture, Robert and thanks for sharing.  What was your setup?


I shot these using a Sony a99II with a Tamron 200-500m lens at f9 and an ISO of 6400 to 10000 with the exposure being anywhere from 2 to 5 seconds, I'm gonna try with my telescope here soon, and thanks.
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holliswood
Awesome pictures. 
-Fred

ICCC Member #1871
MilSpec-Ops #1278
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #41
Perfection Heater Collectors #2 
CANADIAN BLUES SYNDICATE #57
Coleman Slant Saver #65

snipesfred on Insta
Big Ferd on YT
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1hpycmpr
bngreenchev wrote:


I shot these using a Sony a99II with a Tamron 200-500m lens at f9 and an ISO of 6400 to 10000 with the exposure being anywhere from 2 to 5 seconds, I'm gonna try with my telescope here soon, and thanks.
Those turned out real nice considering the exposure times and focal length.  Astroimaging is a very unforgiving hobby!  Hopefully you can capture some images through your scope.  I might try with a Celestron C-5 and a focal reducer.
Mark
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austin65uri
Very nice capture of a big, dirty snowball blasted into existence about 4.6 billion years ago and wandering about our sun since. If you missed it, you’ll have to wait 7,000 years. Nice post!
Bill.
ICCC#1601
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Gasman64
Thanks for those images, Robert, I have to look for that comet one of these days...umm, er, nights.
Steve
ICCC #1012
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bngreenchev
Gasman64 wrote:
Thanks for those images, Robert, I have to look for that comet one of these days...umm, er, nights.


Look NorthWest after sunset it will look like a normal star with an orange fuzzy tail, and thanks.
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Gasman64
Thanks for the advice, Robert; all I have are 10x50 binoculars, but will be better than the naked eye.
Steve
ICCC #1012
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bngreenchev
Gasman64 wrote:
Thanks for the advice, Robert; all I have are 10x50 binoculars, but will be better than the naked eye.


Those will be perfect viewing it.
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Gunhippie
Does your telescope have an motorized equatorial tracking mount?

Much lower ISO and longer exposures will get much better results. Without the assist from the equatorial mount, you'll really be pushing for motion. General rule of thumb for non-driven star exposures is to keep the shutter speed faster than 1/the focal length of the lens. With a good tracking equatorial mount, you'll be able to go several minutes--but then you may be pushing it for heat noise in your digital exposure (which is why digital astronomical cameras are usually cooled). Even cosmic-ray strikes on the sensor become a problem with exposures over a minutes or so.

There are programs available that let you take a series of 1/30 second exposures and combine them to get the effect of a much longer exposures, but you still need a tracking mount.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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bngreenchev
Gunhippie wrote:
Does your telescope have an motorized equatorial tracking mount?

Much lower ISO and longer exposures will get much better results. Without the assist from the equatorial mount, you'll really be pushing for motion. General rule of thumb for non-driven star exposures is to keep the shutter speed faster than 1/the focal length of the lens. With a good tracking equatorial mount, you'll be able to go several minutes--but then you may be pushing it for heat noise in your digital exposure (which is why digital astronomical cameras are usually cooled). Even cosmic-ray strikes on the sensor become a problem with exposures over a minutes or so.

There are programs available that let you take a series of 1/30 second exposures and combine them to get the effect of a much longer exposures, but you still need a tracking mount.


It is motorized but as I’ve found out this morning my camera body is to heavy for it to hold and track correctly, along with the fact that it doesn’t track well to begin with.
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Gunhippie
Bummer.

I've been extremely unlucky with this comet so far. I've gotten up at 4 AM three out of the last five nights, and it's been cloudy to the north every time. Of course, it was the mornings I slept in that it was clear!

Guess I'll try again tomorrow... I have the tripod set up and the camera w/540 mm (35mm eq, 70-200 Nikkor w/1.7X TE) sitting by the door ready to go. Hoping that my sensor has enough low-light sensitivity to get fairly noise-free images without a driven mount.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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bngreenchev
Your best bet might be to start looking for it after sunset in the northwest, or go out earlier I was out a 3am and it had been out for at least an 1hr, and found that by 4:15 it would be washed out by the sun. You lens combo should be more that sufficient to get a nice shot, good luck hunting.
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Mister Wilson
Just got back from looking at it with Mrs. Wilson.  We could see it quite well with 7x50 binoculars. Might try again in a day or two with the spotting scope.
Edit:  We started looking for it about 10pm Eastern.  It took us a bit scanning the NW sky, but once I spotted it there was no doubt.  We watched for about 20 minutes then came home.
John
H.C. Lanterns dealer
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #2001 A Turd's Odyssey
Canadian Blues #028
Coleman Slant Saver #31
Looking for 6-56 and 6-58 Birthday lanterns.
There's been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about.
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1hpycmpr
Nice to hear that you and the wife were able to see the comet.  Cloudy evening #2 here.
Mark
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bngreenchev
Just got back from looking at it with Mrs. Wilson.  We could see it quite well with 7x50 binoculars. Might try again in a day or two with the spotting scope.
Edit:  We started looking for it about 10pm Eastern.  It took us a bit scanning the NW sky, but once I spotted it there was no doubt.  We watched for about 20 minutes then came home.


Glad you and Mrs. Wilson got to see it, might be awhile before another one comes along.

1hpycmpr wrote:
Nice to hear that you and the wife were able to see the comet.  Cloudy evening #2 here.


Just cause you want to see something means the weather is gonna say I don't think so, it's like a rule or some natural law or something. If your like me it frustrates the c*** out me.
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Gasman64
I sure know what you mean about the weather's bad timing, Robert.
So, I forget, has the time passed for watching the comet? Clouds rolled in before sunset yesterday, and it rained well into the evening.
Steve
ICCC #1012
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bngreenchev
Gasman64 wrote:
I sure know what you mean about the weather's bad timing, Robert.
So, I forget, has the time passed for watching the comet? Clouds rolled in before sunset yesterday, and it rained well into the evening.


No Sir the comet should be visible till the end of the month after sunset, or if you feel like getting up early like 3am early it can be seen rising half way between North and Northeast till about 4:15am but will washed out by then, there's maybe 4-5 morning viewings left though.Good luck hunting.
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GeraldJP
These are great! Thanks for sharing them.
Gerald

"If we are to have any hope for the future, those who have lanterns must pass them on to others." - Plato
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Flyboyfwa
Took a look tonight and it wasn't clear but I was able to see it.
Andy
Mil-Spec Ops #199
Coleman Slant Saver #54
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #06
275 Appreciation Syndicate #1970
The Coleman Blues 243's #159

ICCC #1741
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1hpycmpr
bngreenchev wrote:

Just cause you want to see something means the weather is gonna say I don't think so, it's like a rule or some natural law or something. If your like me it frustrates the c*** out me.
Spent many years hauling telescope equipment out to the high desert of southwest Wyoming.  Our nemesis was the wind.  It would come up almost every day in the early afternoon.  We would head out to set up before dusk and cover up the equipment.  If the wind didn’t stop right after sunset, which it did quite a bit, it was going to blow all night so we would pack up the scopes and head home.
Mark
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Gunhippie
I tried the sunset viewing last night, but there are large cottonwoods to the N and NW of my house. I guess this is a good excuse to get out and do some camping with a good view to the north.

I think I know a place....
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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bngreenchev
Gunhippie wrote:
I tried the sunset viewing last night, but there are large cottonwoods to the N and NW of my house. I guess this is a good excuse to get out and do some camping with a good view to the north.

I think I know a place....


Sounds like you have a plan, it doesn’t take much elevation to help findIt, all of my viewing spots are at around 1900ft my brother spotted it at 10:15pm, but any reason to go camping is a good one. Next weekend I’ll be in central Oregon dark sky site at 7000ft for a couple of nights
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bngreenchev
1hpycmpr wrote:
Spent many years hauling telescope equipment out to the high desert of southwest Wyoming.  Our nemesis was the wind.  It would come up almost every day in the early afternoon.  We would head out to set up before dusk and cover up the equipment.  If the wind didn’t stop right after sunset, which it did quite a bit, it was going to blow all night so we would pack up the scopes and head home.


I’ve heard stories about that Wyoming wind.
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Gunhippie
Sounds like the Ochocos? I think I'll head up somewhere around Buckhorn lookout on the Wallowa-Whitman NF--it's about forty minutes from home.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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SteveRetherford
those are some really NICE pics !!!
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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Whitegas Extraordinaire
This should be my excuse for pulling out the Celestron. There’s a park nearby where the astronomers tend to gather. Maybe someone will help me with the tracking function!
TY
K
I frighten easily!

My current shade is Coleman!!

To me a lamp without a shade is creepy!

ICCC # 1865

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bngreenchev
Gunhippie wrote:
Sounds like the Ochocos? I think I'll head up somewhere around Buckhorn lookout on the Wallowa-Whitman NF--it's about forty minutes from home.


It's Dixie Butte near Prarie City
This should be my excuse for pulling out the Celestron. There’s a park nearby where the astronomers tend to gather. Maybe someone will help me with the tracking function!
TY
K


Never have got my 4se to align properly.
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Gunhippie
Ah, OK. Over here we'd call that Eastern Oregon. Cascades to a N-S line from the mouth of the John Day river we call Central. East from there to ID is Eastern.

When I lived in Western Oregon, anything east of the Cascades crest was Eastern OR.

Nice country that, and just a few mountains away from me. Have a great trip!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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1hpycmpr
This should be my excuse for pulling out the Celestron. There’s a park nearby where the astronomers tend to gather. Maybe someone will help me with the tracking function!
TY
K
Not sure if they are gathering due to current affairs but the local astronomy club is a great place to possibly get some help regarding your Celestron mount.  They usually meet once a month and usually around new moon.  Most are willing to help out.
Mark
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Whitegas Extraordinaire
1hpycmpr wrote:
Not sure if they are gathering due to current affairs but the local astronomy club is a great place to possibly get some help regarding your Celestron mount.  They usually meet once a month and usually around new moon.  Most are willing to help out.

Knowing where they gather and it being 5 miles away makes it a no excuse kind of situation.
TY
Kevin
I frighten easily!

My current shade is Coleman!!

To me a lamp without a shade is creepy!

ICCC # 1865

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Gasman64
Thanks for answering my question, Robert, I definitely don't want to miss it.
Steve
ICCC #1012
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bngreenchev
Thanks for all the nice comments.
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