200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Fast_Freddy
My neighbor was digging a hole for a fence post and came up with a solid hit.  He retrieved what looks like a hand held sledge hammer.  Have you seen one like this and how old do you think it is?

Fred

Psalm 19:14

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Gavercronos
Looks like a mechanic's brass mall. Used for pounding steel parts together when you don't want to deform the steel.  Most of them will be all mushroomed over like that after a decade or so of bashing stuff. 
WillCat

Chautauqua County, New York
Slant Saver [svg] Frank MakerNew York State Route 5 marker

Wanted: GPA dated 5/89 (Red 286?  Black Powerhouse? 508? Early Unleadeds? Canadian things? I'll settle for a propane job at this point) Vintage Sunbeam Mixmaster bowls and accessories, Ruby-cased 10in lamp shade, 7D Mag-lite
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74HARLEY
Cool find!
Joe
looking for 200a 11-56,9-77,2-65 Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #0004 ICCC #1262
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #19
Frank appreciation syndicate member #9
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Rustytank
Yep mall, mallet whatever they call it in your neck of the woods. I bet it will clean up nicely. 
275 Appreciation Syndicate #0245
Looking for birthday lanterns 11/58, 3/68, 3/73, 11/96, 6/97, 11/97, 12/00
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Hot Diggity
Copper head with a hollow steel handle?  I have one about that size with a wooden handle in my tool box.  I call it my copper bopper.  40 years ago I would file it back into shape when it got peened over like that.  Now I just hammer it back into shape to retain its mass.  That's a nice find and might have a bit of history. 
Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
Milspec Syndicate #510
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0510
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #12
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #510
Coleman Slant Saver #510
Frank Appreciation Syndicate Member #2
Tinker, Toy maker, Trash picker, Wickie, Lamp loon
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Nutz
Nice find !
I'm nutz
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Gasman64
Interesting find; I wonder if there's other tools in the ground?
Steve
ICCC #1012
logoballistol logo 1a.png

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gpaguy
It looks like it's been in the ground since around the beginning of civilization. 


John
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salukispeed
With that grey color Is it possible it is a lead mallet. 
Bob
ICCC 1868
Perfection appreciation #10
Milspec 65252
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DougA
gpaguy wrote:
It looks like it's been in the ground since around the beginning of civilization. 

Ogg has been looking for that for eons; he always wondered where he had set that down.  😉
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Perfection Heater Collectors #5 
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stoves1234
It could have a lead head. We had a couple lead hammers similar to that back in the day in the machine shop. Sort of an early version of a dead-blow hammer.
Jim Brizzolara
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offrink
I agree on the lead head. A dead blow hammer. Using lead that means that also don’t spark. 
Ben
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0035
Looking for B-Day dates of 6/80, 2/84, 3/11, and 12/13
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Gunhippie
Yep, from the color of the corrosion on the head I'd say it's lead. I have a 3lb single-jack (one-handed) with a tin head I use as a persuader when wrenching on some of our bigger equipment.

Easy enough to determine: If it's lead (or tin), you can cut it with a knife.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Tgarner01
Here's a couple of our homemade ones.
IMG_20200722_100456_copy_756x1008.jpg 
Have a few more laying around the shop. When they get worn down, we melt them down and re-pour them. Great for when you need to hammer on something with threads like knocking axle shafts out of hubs. Even brass hammers can damage threads. Use these daily
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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stoves1234
The favorite tool of a lot of guys- a Bigger Hammer!
Jim Brizzolara
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BrianBo
Because we like our acronyms, the British car guys would call that a BFH. Stands for big hammer. You can guess the rest. Lead hammers are used to knock the spinners off to remove wire wheels. Usually not that big tho.  If you look at an old video of a pit stop at Le Mans, the pit crew dashes out and starts whacking at the wheels with big, lead hammers🙂
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Deanofid
Lead mallet.  Machinists use them to gently move stock from side to side while truing up a work piece in a four jaw independent chuck.  Otherwise used for knock-off tools or for smacking small slugging wrenches.
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
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Gunhippie
BrianBo wrote:
Because we like our acronyms, the British car guys would call that a BFH. Stands for big hammer. You can guess the rest. Lead hammers are used to knock the spinners off to remove wire wheels. Usually not that big tho.  If you look at an old video of a pit stop at Le Mans, the pit crew dashes out and starts whacking at the wheels with big, lead hammers🙂


I'd forgotten about that! My rarely-running TR3 came with a lead mallet for the knock-offs. Then just try to remember which way the knock-off on this side of the car go....
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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bowenstudios
This is making me want to cast a few lead heads to use around the shop. I'm thinking a tin can would make a nice mould and I bet I have a couple really hot stoves to use. Or maybe even fire up the Clayton Lambert plumbers furnace.
-Mike
______________________________________

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #651
Mil-SpecOps #0651
The Coleman Blue's 243's #154
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Tgarner01
This is making me want to cast a few lead heads to use around the shop. I'm thinking a tin can would make a nice mould and I bet I have a couple really hot stoves to use. Or maybe even fire up the Clayton Lambert plumbers furnace.

I'll try to get you some pictures of our setup for molding/casting lead hammers/mallets tomorrow when I get back to the shop. Pretty simple, but effective.
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Deanofid
And a moll is a mafia gangster's girl.
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
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stoves1234
Dean, if you know what a "moll" is you must be almost as old as me.
Jim Brizzolara
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Gunhippie
Zulu Kono wrote:
A mall is where hipsters buy their mom-jeans.
A maul  is a sledge hammer with
a wood-splitting edge on one side.


Nope. That's a splitting maul. A true maul is flat both sides.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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arizonacamper
I have a good selection of bfh's ranging is size from 32oz (a girls hammer) to 40-54 and 60 oz. When i have to hit a truck with it i want the truck to feel it!!
I have a great job. I get to take a hammer and beat the out of a vehicle and get paid for it too!
Life is good!!😎
Shawn
Owner of Copper State Diesel And Automotive. See my facebook page.

Lanterns are like tools. 
You can not have too many unless your wife says so!!

Gas is what you use for washing parts diesel is for making power!

Coleman blues 243 #147
Coleman 275 appreciation #74
Milspec syndicate #39

Looking for any lanterns or stoves dated 5/63 or 1/72
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byegorge
Or get mauled by a bear. My BFH is 160 oz.
George
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Deanofid
stoves1234 wrote:
Dean, if you know what a "moll" is you must be almost as old as me.

Watch it bub, or I'll drill ya wit my heater...
🙂
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
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offrink
byegorge wrote:
Or get mauled by a bear. My BFH is 160 oz.


160 ounces are cute! I prefer the 256 ounce varieties. Longest handle I can get too.

When I was in college I set up big tents in the summer for work. I would windmill a single 16 lb hammer pounding 4’ long stakes in. Was good looking, strong as an ox, and had a beautiful future wife to see every night. 
Ben
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0035
Looking for B-Day dates of 6/80, 2/84, 3/11, and 12/13
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Ed66Horan
Some useless information I've collected from my early yrs. swinging heavy hammers, FWIW,
Sledgehammers have fairly wide faces, maybe 2 1/2 to 3" wide, and because of that they have a compact length. Railroads use spike mauls, which are usually 10 lbs., but have a long drawn out profile and a head diameter of about 1 to 1 1/2" for spiking rail. While some folks I know drive rail spikes with sledgehammers, a spike maul is the preferred tool when working around switches were rails get close to one another. Another difference between a spike maul and sledge hammer is the length of the handle. Typical sledgehammers have a 32" handle and a spike maul handle is usually 36" long. Windmilling a hammer is the only way to do it if a lot of blows are required. Picking the hammer up after each blow will wear ya out after about 20 blows. Windmilling requires a firm grip and muscle memory for accurate return hits. An old retired trackman told me that "if the hammer ain't  a singin', you ain't a swingin'. Lol

Ed

Sears Collector Club #66  MilSpecOps #0030 
ICCC # 1575  Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate  #212
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #38

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