200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Moses_Yoder
This has nothing to do with Coleman lanterns except for the fact my car frequently has lanterns in it. I have a 2003 Ford Crown Victoria with Interceptor package (retired police car). I get my oil changed at Drove & Shine which is like a full service business for washing, detailing, and changing oil. It costs me about $35 becausee it needs 6 quarts of oil. I have 206,000 miles on it now. It is in excellent shape. They keep pushing the engine fllush and last time I figured it would be worth it for the high mileage. I think it cost around $6. They dump in a bottle of something, you run the engine for about 2 minutes, then they drain the oil and the flushing substance. Is this something I should do occasionally? Is it something I can add myself on the way to get my oil changed and leave it in the engine for about 10 minutes while I drive to the place to change my oil? Is there anything else I should do to take care of my engine? 
Moses D Yoder/Mose/Mo
ICCC #1278
Sears Syndicate # 651 / 275 Appreciation Syndicate #159 / Slant Saver #22
Psalm 97:11 Light shines on the righteous and joy on the upright in heart.

 
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Majicwrench
You do not need to do any sort of "flush".

No telling what is in their "flush" product.  Engine are full of rubber seals and other things that can get damaged. Just put oil in your engine.
Keith
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rob_pontius
I wouldn't do any kind of flush Moses. The oil that goes into your car has detergents in it to keep things from bonding to the inside of your engine and make sure that it goes into the oil filter. On another note, don't ever let anyone convince you to do a transmission flush. The grit that's in the fluid is necessary for a high mileage transmission to keep working. The grit is actually material from the clutches inside of the transmission. If you flush it, you lose all of that material and the transmission will start slipping and fail shortly after having it done. Fluid and filter changes only.
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salukispeed
I am with Majicwrench Proper Good quality oil changed at or before the recommended  mileage  is the best treatment I error on the side of before ( like 1/2 to 2/3 )  of the recommended ( probably wasteful ). WAY Back in the day when we used Non detergent straight weight oils their was merit in products like Rislone to flush out the accumulated  debris and carbon. But today engines and oils are much better and are sufficient. Case in point My BIL does not take care of his cars and at 205,000 miles he was sold the same type treatment and it dislodged so much debris and gunk it clogged the oil pump screen and the car never made it out of the change lot. All the result of years of bad maintenance and a bad decision  to flush on top of it. A clean engine will not benefit  But will likely not harm. Also the dirty oil they show you is proof the oil is doing its job and not likely the result of needing a flush.  If your having concerns change the oil  extra early. There are the odd situations like a varnished sticky lifter that may benefit but very rare. and are likely the result of past neglect??? Just my opinion!
Bob
ICCC 1868
Perfection appreciation #10
Milspec 65252
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Dubblbubbl
If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Sounds like these guys want to sell you something you don’t need.  If you’re concerned about injector dirtiness you can try a can of seafoam in the tank.  I run a can through every once in awhile at half the recommended dose, 1 can for 30 gallons of gas, but I only have 165k miles on my f150.

I remember my dad used kero to clean the oil passages in the v8 engine on my old 68 ford back in high school and I thought he was going to blow up the engine.  He ran a quart of k in my car mixed with 4 qts of oil to fix a valve tap/lifter noise problem.  Ran the engine until it warmed up, then drained and refilled with straight oil.  Seemed to help if I remember correctly, but that was 45 years ago, there is no way I would do such a thing today, but what are you gonna tell your dad?
Rob in NC
MilSpecOps Syndicate #1962
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1962

Sometimes we are the windshield, Sometimes we are the bug...
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MotorcycleDan
Agree with everyone else here. With a good quality oil, something like this is not needed. I have the same motor with over 230 K on it. I would not even think of doing an oil flush on it. 
Dan ICCC #900
ICCC Treasure
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arizonacamper
I am a ford technician and you dont want to add anything to the engine but oil. The cylinder heads on your engine are aluminum and the camshaft ride on aluminum castings on the cylinder head. anything that'll get dislodged in there or remove the oil and you're running metal-to-metal and it will destroy the heads for you.  if you want to run something through the injectors to clean them get a can of bg44k best stuff made.
Shawn 
Owner of Copper State Diesel And Automotive. See my facebook page.

Lanterns are like tools. 
You can not have too many unless your wife says so!!

Gas is what you use for washing parts diesel is for making power!

Coleman blues 243 #147
Coleman 275 appreciation #74
Milspec syndicate #39

Looking for any lanterns or stoves dated 5/63 or 1/72
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RobSchroff
I wouldn't endorse a "flush" either, but I wouldn't panic about it if it was done, especially if they only charged you $6. It sounds like they dumped an inexpensive "cleaner" in the oil (probably some petroleum distillate), ran it for a couple minutes, then changed the oil.  The "cleaner" dilutes the oil and may help clean internal components.  It can also "wash" oil (temporarily) off of components that critically need it, as Shawn said.  There is a risk of dislodging "gunk" but that should be captured by the oil filter they subsequently changed.

If you want to feel better about it, get another basic oil and filter change.  
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tonywebber45
I never use an engine flush before doing an oil change,just warm the engine first, the main problem with using a flush on a higher mileage engine is that it can dislodge all sorts of deposits from inside and although MOST of it will come out when the oil is dropped not all of it will and it can block the oil pick up in the sump and cause oil starvation/low pressure issues, just use a good quality oil and get it changed once a year unless you do a high mileage then maybe more often. I know plenty of garages in my area that charge for a flushing agent but i also know that not as many actually use one!
No honey its not another lamp,just parts for one I already have. ICCC #1479
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zoomkat
Pretty much snake oil. You may cause some gunk to come lose and plug up an oil passageway, then you will have trouble. 
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Loganeffecto
I wouldn't. Modern oil and fuels are probably a lot cleaner. Loved my '04 Mercury Marauder. 
Logan, formerly known as Fester. (It means to rot)
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egroscup
You must resist Moses, you don't need to do anything more than change the oil and use a quality oil filter. If you want to go down another internet rabbit hole you can check out the forums over at bobistheoilguy.com       E.
The year 2259, the place Babylon 5
Erik
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outlawmws

Same advise,  No Flushes - I've seen those do more damage than good... 

The best "Engine flush" is Synthetic oil.  My personal philosophy for what it is worth (I've been building engines, race cars and 4X4 truck conversations and off road mods since I was 17), is high revving engines need Synth to live long happy lives.  My DD  Samurai WINDS on the freeway, and always gets Synth,  both vans did/do also.  V8's not so much (unless racing - different use case, and those ARE high winders), but it won't hurt either.

I've just recently tried Seafoam in the gas tank, and was impressed overall.  Generally though for cleaning injectors I run a tank of Chevron with Techron every few months and that seems to help.

If using Dyno oil I change every 3K miles.  if synth  every 7K    - This is about half of the Mfgs recommendation - but they also want you back to buy another car.  (Suzuki used to have a plate under the hood of Samurais that the vehicle was designed to operate 5 years, or 50K miles whichever came first - HA!  - nearing 250K on my current DD and 33 years...)  There is no reason any decently designed and maintained engine won't go 300-500K (the 33 YO van has just under 320K miles, and passed Smog 2 months ago VERY clean, (with Seafoam in the gas) - Same with the Sami 2 days ago.  actually cleanest its EVER passed...


[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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10gage
I run Mobil 1 in my 99 suburban. I’ve got a lead foot and this thing runs like new. I have over 240 thousand on it with original motor and transmission. I have only rebuilt the rearend. 
James sizemore
milspec syndicate #1941
slant savers #68
quicklite crew#43
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Dubblbubbl
Wanted to post this as soon as I saw this thread

Elwood Blues:

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It's got a cop motor, a 440 cubic inch plant, it's got cop tires, cop suspensions, cop shocks. It's a model made before catalytic converters so it'll run good on regular gas. What do you say, is it the new Bluesmobile or what?
Rob in NC
MilSpecOps Syndicate #1962
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1962

Sometimes we are the windshield, Sometimes we are the bug...
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Steve66
In no way shape or form does this apply to modern engines but I bought an old 52 John Deere once and the engine was so dirty on the inside that when I pulled the oil plug nothing came out. I had to poke my finger through the sludge to let what passed for oil to come splattering out. It looked like old black coffee. I followed my uncle's advice and filled the crankcase with kerosene and ran the engine for about a minute and then drained and filled with new oil. It was amazing how much sludge came out. I fouled plugs like crazy at first but after I repeated the flush cycle several times everything was good. That was 25 years ago and the thing still runs like a champ.
Coleman Quicklite Crew #26
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offrink
Steve66 wrote:
In no way shape or form does this apply to modern engines but I bought an old 52 John Deere once and the engine was so dirty on the inside that when I pulled the oil plug nothing came out. I had to poke my finger through the sludge to let what passed for oil to come splattering out. It looked like old black coffee. I followed my uncle's advice and filled the crankcase with kerosene and ran the engine for about a minute and then drained and filled with new oil. It was amazing how much sludge came out. I fouled plugs like crazy at first but after I repeated the flush cycle several times everything was good. That was 25 years ago and the thing still runs like a champ.


ive done the same with transmissions but not on a modern engine. 
Ben
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0035
Looking for B-Day dates of 6/80, 2/84, 3/11, and 12/13
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egroscup
Another sludge story, my firs car was a free '66 Chevy Bel-Air. Boring beige sedan 250 inline 6 with a powerglide. Power steering but manual drum brakes. I started driving it to school and one day on the way home it stuck a lifter. Off comes the valve cover and oh my it was bad. I scraped a bucketload of sludge out of the top of that thing. All of the hollow pushrod tubes were plugged solid so the poor thing wasn't getting any oil at all to the top end. Cleaned it all up and it ran pretty well but it got frequent oil changes with a little ATF mixed in. Oil always came out nasty on that one. It turned into a real oil burner but that was after I traded it for a cancer ridden '58 Cadillac Sedan De Ville.
The year 2259, the place Babylon 5
Erik
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Moses_Yoder
Thanks for all the replies. Concensus is no engine flush but I will put some seafoam in the tank to clean the injectors. Sounds good to me. 
Moses D Yoder/Mose/Mo
ICCC #1278
Sears Syndicate # 651 / 275 Appreciation Syndicate #159 / Slant Saver #22
Psalm 97:11 Light shines on the righteous and joy on the upright in heart.

 
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Colonel_kernel
Just say no. 
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Majicwrench
Gads leave the Seafoam in the can and not in your tank!! 

Look in your owners manual to see if it recommends Seafoam in the tank or engine flushes or transmission flushes. 

It wont.
Keith
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