200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

mudbox
This followed me home today from the flea.  I had a feeling that it was special, but really had no clue.

I don't know much if anything about old Boy Scout uniforms.  From what I've read, Sigmond Eisner Co. lost their contract with the Boy Scouts in 1932.  So, this hat can be no newer than that.  
Sigmond Eisner Co. made uniforms for the B.S.A., the U.S. military, and other countries as well.

I think this is Beaver Felt, but again, I really don't have a clue.  It's well made, that I could tell just by holding it.  

If anyone can provide any additional info, I'd sure appreciate it.



-Jason
Milspec Ops #1978
275 Syndicate #228
Quicklite Crew #49
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GCinSC
Hey Courtney !
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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Kansas John
That’s cool!  
John M. Lawrence, KS
ICCC #1431

Looking for a 214 kero and REI single burner anniversary stove as well as any Coleman born on date 10/77, 1/80
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Hot Diggity
Quality beaver felt hats will roll up slightly at the edge of the brim when wet.  Lesser quality felt (USMC issue Alexander) will sag terribly.

All the brim needs is a nice press to make it flat again.
shopping (1).jpegI like this style.

There may have been a buckled strap to go with the cord.
Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
Milspec Syndicate #510
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0510
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #12
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #510
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Frank Appreciation Syndicate Member #2
Tinker, Toy maker, Trash picker, Wickie, Lamp loon
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Bob1774
Nice find, and apparently, great condition!  
I have some old BSA photos from when my father was in scouting posted in one corner of my "man cave/sports bar."  One is of my father wearing what appears to be a very similar hat.  He was born in 1924, so that photo was maybe mid/late 1930's?
A photo of his troop members show a similar felt hat, with a Fleur de Li / scout emblem.  A later photo has a group with a pith helmet, and appear to be older, perhaps in high school.  I still have the pith helmet.
Ironically, in a much later photo, 1962, was of my Dad and me sitting on a table we had lashed together earlier, with a nice 228D hanging.  We were competing in a district jamboree.  That photo with the 228D was one of the things that brought me to this forum looking for one!

IMG_1849.jpg  IMG_1850.jpg  IMG_1851.jpg  IMG_1853.jpg  IMG_1854.jpg  IMG_1833.jpg 
Bob
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GCinSC

Bob

Really cool BW pics. To have a full uniform as a young Scout makes you walk tall and straight. Knife on belt hook canteen strap? Over shoulder. 


Good memories. 


Gary 

Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
Quote
Gasman64
All I can say, Jason, is that is a fine old hat, and a good purchase! I know a man that makes all sorts of hats, many historical reproductions, and it's an interesting subject to me.  However, I have absorbed very little of his knowledge.
Steve
ICCC #1012
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outlawmws
What a cool find!  Well done!
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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BSAGuy
GCinSC wrote:
Hey Courtney !


I have a book, kinda like the Coleman book, that has lots of details on BSA uniforms through the years.  Let me go get it and I'll post some scoop.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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BSAGuy
The sweat band logo and First Class emblems date this hat to 1928-1932 and it was made by The Sigmund Eisner Company of Red Bank, NJ.  They were mostly into textiles, so I assume that the hats were sub-contracted to others under the Eisner label, but that is conjecture only on my part.

Sigmund Eisner (1859-1925) was born in Bohemia and immigrated to the USA in 1880.  The eponymous Sigmund Eisner Company was a very successful manufacturer of uniforms for the US military, the National Park Service, other government agencies, and organizations like the BSA, through WWi and WWII.  They got into this line of business with the opening of the Spanish American War in 1898.  Employment peaked at 5,000 during WWII.

Sigmund is the great-grandfather of Michael Eisner, who was the chairman/CEO of Walt Disney Company from 1984-2005.  

In mid-1932, Eisner lost the BSA uniform contract to Sweet-Orr Company.  Sweet-Orr was founded in Wappingers Falls, NY by James Orr (an Irish immigrant) and his nephews Clayton and Clinton A. Sweet in 1871,  The company is still in business although they do not have the BSA contract.

I don't know, but I assume the BSA goods are mostly made in China today, which is really a shame.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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GCinSC

A new genre of collecting but likely already exists. 


Cool history Courtenay. 

On antiques roadshow appraiser says market appeal is both BSA collectors and Disney fans. 

Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
Quote
BSAGuy
Yes, Gary,  There are a lot of guys who collect BSA stuff.  There is an entire arcane argot for the classification of items, especially Order of the Arrow flaps.  Years ago, stuff was made for use and now, it's different with tons of stuff being made just for collecting. Kinda takes the fun out of it.

For my troop's 75th anniversary in 2013 (in continuous operation since 1938 and in a former life at a different chartering organization back to 1917), we had a big shindig/celebration.  As Scoutmaster and a lover of history, I re-created a Scoutmaster uniform from 1927 and 1938 to wear to the event.  I still wear these to meetings as a way to to help these young kids who have NO clue that anything happened before, say 2010, to get some sense of the long tradition of which they are a part.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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xvz12
I don't have much to offer on this, but as of the time I 'retired' from Scouting (2016) it was a requirement that Scout uniforms be made in the USA...that may well have changed by now.
Wynn - xvz12

ICCC#1560
MilSpecOps Syndicate #77
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0150
Looking for almost anything kero...[wink]
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Bob1774
GCinSC wrote:

Bob

Really cool BW pics. To have a full uniform as a young Scout makes you walk tall and straight. Knife on belt hook canteen strap? Over shoulder. 


Good memories. 


Gary 


Thanks for your reply.  Yes, it was a great time to be a scout, and have have the expertise of others to encourage you to do you best.  My Dad is gone, but I still have his intuitive intentions to make scouting a good example of how proceed in the world. 
Bob
Quote
mudbox
Bob1774 wrote:
Nice find, and apparently, great condition!  
I have some old BSA photos from when my father was in scouting posted in one corner of my "man cave/sports bar."  One is of my father wearing what appears to be a very similar hat.  He was born in 1924, so that photo was maybe mid/late 1930's?
A photo of his troop members show a similar felt hat, with a Fleur de Li / scout emblem.  A later photo has a group with a pith helmet, and appear to be older, perhaps in high school.  I still have the pith helmet.
Ironically, in a much later photo, 1962, was of my Dad and me sitting on a table we had lashed together earlier, with a nice 228D hanging.  We were competing in a district jamboree.  That photo with the 228D was one of the things that brought me to this forum looking for one!
 


Awesome pictures, Bob.  Thanks for sharing.  What a great homage to your old man.  👍
-Jason
Milspec Ops #1978
275 Syndicate #228
Quicklite Crew #49
Quote
mudbox
BSAGuy wrote:
The sweat band logo and First Class emblems date this hat to 1928-1932 and it was made by The Sigmund Eisner Company of Red Bank, NJ.  They were mostly into textiles, so I assume that the hats were sub-contracted to others under the Eisner label, but that us conjecture only on my part.

Sigmund Eisner (1859-1925) was born in Bohemia and immigrated to the USA in 1880.  The eponymous Sigmund Eisner Company was based in Red Bank, NJ. The company and was a very successful manufacturer of uniforms for the US military, the National Park Service other government agencies, and organizations like the BSA through WWi and WWII.  They got into this line of business with the opening of the Spanish American War in 1898.  Employment peaked at 5,000 during WWII.

Sigmund is the great-grandfather of Michael Eisner, who was the chairman/CEO of Walt Disney Company from 1984-2005.  

In mid-1932, Eisner lost the BSA uniform contract to Sweet-Orr Company.  Sweet-Orr was founded in Wappingers Falls, Ny by James Orr (an Irish immigrant) and his nephews Clayton and Clinton A=Sweet in 1871,  The company is still in business although they do not have the BSA contract.

I don't know, but I assume the BSA goods are mostly made in China today, which is really a shame.



This is perfect!  Thanks!  Just what I was looking for.  1928-1932 is much closer to a precise date than I ever anticipated.  Thanks Courtenay!
-Jason
Milspec Ops #1978
275 Syndicate #228
Quicklite Crew #49
Quote
GCinSC
Courtenay,

I have a SMALL collection of BSA patches but one I have kept in a display box is a CUYAHOGA LODGE NO. 17 Order of the Arrow pocket flap patch. Cuyahoga is the county that Cleveland Ohio is in.

Many good memories of the BSA years and adult leaders that gave so much to our troop.

Gary 
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
Quote


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