200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Smokey12
Helping my mother in law move over the last while and have been coming across some cool stuff. My MIL had some things belonging to my wife’s grandfather who was a WW2 Vet and she passed them on to us which was very nice of her. One thing that I took to was an old wool sports coat. Going to try to get the sleeves lengthened an inch or so but besides that it fits really nice. Another thing was an axe which could use some TLC. Seems google is telling me linseed oil is best for the wooden handle but I was wondering if neatsfoot oil would work. I know there are a few axe aficionados here so I thought I would tap into that for best practices. Thanks again guys ! 
Don
Canadian Blues member #26
Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #O177
ICCC Member # 1584
Quote
Weirdnerd
I have been told to use non boiled linseed oil, let it dry for a couple of days and then rub bees wax on the handle. so far I have used only the bees wax and it does make the handles less " blistery".
Can't sleep, squirrels will eat me....

If you need a Sun Flame Generator Model 100-107 ( for Sunflame lanterns models 105, 106, 107 and 110) give me a PM, I have close to 80 of those, 15 bucks each.


Werner
Quote
Gunhippie
A good sanding down to about 220 grit followed by linseed oil. Keep wiping the oil on until it won't absorb anymore, then wipe dry and let sit for a day.

Linseed oil is for wood, neat's foot for leather. The linseed oil will "set up" in a day or so, neat's foot never.

For a better grip, I like to wax the handle with a good furniture wax after the oil has set.

PS: I have a very nice old Pendelton wool duster with sleeves a couple of inches too long. I'll send you those inches for your coat!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Weirdnerd
I have been filing an axe I have not used in years, trying to shape it into a "bearded axe" ( sort of lightweight for backpack hiking) , Im taking it easy to not disturb the temper. heat is bad on axes.
Can't sleep, squirrels will eat me....

If you need a Sun Flame Generator Model 100-107 ( for Sunflame lanterns models 105, 106, 107 and 110) give me a PM, I have close to 80 of those, 15 bucks each.


Werner
Quote
Smokey12
Thanks guys
i was thinking the neats foot oil would absorb into the wood so now I’m glad I asked! 
Don
Canadian Blues member #26
Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #O177
ICCC Member # 1584
Quote
Bob1774
Nice to have some heirloom items that are usable!
Ironically, I just hung a new handle on an axe head today!  I've done them before, but thought there are always some clever, crafted people on youtube with good ideas and demonstrations.  The one I watched recommended only "boiled," linseed oil.  I found an unmarked Hudson Bay tomahawk head for $1 at the flea market last year, and decided to give it a handle today.  It was a lightweight 1000g head, which will pair nicely with my "Genuine Norlund."  If anyone knows the maker of the head below, I'd be appreciative.

Enjoy your axe, and do watch how to correctly sharpen them if you're not familiar.

The link below is a good read and very informative for axe care.
http://www.timbergadgets.com/axe-handle-guide-which-oil-to-use/#:~:text=once%20a%20year.-,Maintaining%20Your%20Axe%20Handle,oil%20and%20let%20it%20dry.

IMG_4005.jpg 
Bob
Quote
bowenstudios
Weirdnerd mention non-boiled or raw linseed oil. It may very well work but be warned it often takes a long time to dry. I did a bookcase in it, I didn't research the difference, and a month later it still seemed soft, of course I didn't use anything like wax afterwards. Now I just use boiled and it works great, have even used it on an old Willys wagon we want to leave "patinated" (rusty). Much better than clearing over rust as it will eventually fog and peel.
-Mike
______________________________________

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #651
Mil-SpecOps #0651
The Coleman Blue's 243's #154
Quote
jkonrad
Boiled linseed oil. Apply once a day for a week, then once a week for a month, then once a month for a year. After that once a year to preserve wood handles.
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Gunhippie
Raw linseed oil takes a year or so to set. "Boiled" linseed oil contains "dryers", catalysts that let it polymerize in a day or less in contact with air.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Smokey12
You know I’m shamed to say I’ve never really took pride in an axe before. I have two that I use regularly. One is a cheap heavy plastic handled one I leave outside by my fire pit and sharpen with a file and the other is an estwing that I use hiking and camping that I sharpen with a stone. From my research this one that belonged to my wife’s Grandfather is from the 70s I think and says HB for hults bruk on the head. 
Don
Canadian Blues member #26
Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #O177
ICCC Member # 1584
Quote
austin65uri
I cut boiled linseed oil by about 1/3rd by adding pure turpentine. It speeds up penetration/ drying and smells great!  
Bill.
ICCC#1601
Quote
Bob1774
Smokey12 wrote:
You know I’m shamed to say I’ve never really took pride in an axe before. I have two that I use regularly. One is a cheap heavy plastic handled one I leave outside by my fire pit and sharpen with a file and the other is an estwing that I use hiking and camping that I sharpen with a stone. From my research this one that belonged to my wife’s Grandfather is from the 70s I think and says HB for hults bruk on the head. 


Those Swedish axes are some of the best ever made and pricey to buy used.  Definitely treat it right, and perhaps post a photo?
Bob
Quote
Smokey12
The handle is stamped master craft which is a Canadian Tire brand 
Don
Canadian Blues member #26
Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #O177
ICCC Member # 1584
Quote
Banjoman
Yup on the linseed oil. I just redid my canoe paddles with it handles only marine varnish on the blades feels awesome now
Darrell
Quote
SteveRetherford
i used on my Krag as well . but this is the before pic .
[krag-in-pieces]
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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Gunhippie
Linseed oil and Renaissance wax:

[8916015127_c93a728c5a_b]

A perfect non-slip finish in any weather.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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10gage
Krag Jorgensens are cool as hell. Nice one Steve 
James sizemore
milspec syndicate #1941
slant savers #68
quicklite crew#43
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Bob1774
Great looking axe!  I wouldn't do much of anything, except maybe the linseed oil as discussed.  It already has a nice patina.  Whoever replaced the handle did a nice job, too.  Definitely not the axe to leave outside by the campfire.
Bob
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Whitegas Extraordinaire

I cut boiled linseed oil by about 1/3rd by adding pure turpentine. It speeds up penetration/ drying and smells great!  [/QUOT]

^^^^^ This! Make sure you buy Pure Turpentine! 

I frighten easily!

My current shade is Coleman!!

To me a lamp without a shade is creepy!

ICCC # 1865

Quote
SteveRetherford
just something of interest i found looking at ebay Krag parts today but cant swear to the accuracy .

This is a 4 oz bottle of pure raw Linseed oil. I have started selling this oil again after collectors 
have asked me to bring it back to eBay. This oil is produced without the addition of oxidizing ions
such as chromium that are added to some processed flax or linseed seed oils to speed up drying. This is
the oil used on the M1 Carbine produced during WWII. Raw Linseed oil or flax was used at the original  Springfield Armory
in Springfield Massachusetts staring with it first long gun the 1795 Musket. It was used on all long guns
until late 1941 when the M1 Garand was changed from linseed oil  over to Tung. Most military wood stock have
been traditionally treated with raw linseed oil.
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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gotac65
Nice 30-40 Krag Steve!
ICCC# 1740
Mable and Jasper's
Beauty Parlor & Chainsaw Repair
We can fix anything!
Quote
gotac65
Gunhippie, is that a bull barrel 10-22?
ICCC# 1740
Mable and Jasper's
Beauty Parlor & Chainsaw Repair
We can fix anything!
Quote
Gunhippie
gotac65 wrote:
Gunhippie, is that a bull barrel 10-22?


Tony Kidd sleeved barrel. Barrel is made by Walter Lothar. Amazing accuracy for little weight. The entire gun weighs just about exactly 5 pounds and swings like a shotgun.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
MartyJ
Wood finishes are like cars and sports team, a lot of personal preferences.  "Boiled" linseed oil isn't boiled at all but have heavy metal dryers that make it set up quickly as already mentioned.  Some people are afraid of the dryer chemicals but as long as it isn't a food use object such as a wooden bowl, I would think it should cause much harm.  Turpentine will thin for penetration as most linseed oil, "boiled" or raw is fairly thick and has a hard time penetrating fine wood grain like hickory or ash which is typically used on a axe handle.  If you prefer raw linseed oil, it does take time to set but it will set quicker if you rub it in with enough force and friction to produce some heat and then put it in the sun to harden.  Several coats will increase the aged look.    A thinned linseed oil solution is nice to swell a loose head joint also and will not shrink back down like water.   A nice commercial product is Tried and True which is a food grade linseed oil with beeswax mixed in that penetrates well and has the wax built in for buffing after it hardens.  It is fairly expensive but I buy it by the pint and use it for years.  I use it on all my firearms and tool handles.  When doing hand finishes, remembers the old saying for hand polishing fine furniture: once a day for a week, once a week for a month and thereafter, once a year.   I really enjoy the look of an aged axe handle with a nice finish. 

BTW: on wood or treen used in cooking, I use only mineral oil.  It doesn't go rancid like cooking oil and has no taste.
Marty
Quote
BSAGuy
OK, I'll throw a wrench in here.  I like tung oil instead of BLO.  Get the 100% pure tung oil, not one of the "tung oil finishes."  The finishes have various chemicals in them.  I use tung oil on all my wood stuff like handles, mil-surp stocks, etc.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
Quote
Bob1774
Bob1774 wrote:
Nice to have some heirloom items that are usable!
Ironically, I just hung a new handle on an axe head today!  I've done them before, but thought there are always some clever, crafted people on youtube with good ideas and demonstrations.  The one I watched recommended only "boiled," linseed oil.  I found an unmarked Hudson Bay tomahawk head for $1 at the flea market last year, and decided to give it a handle today.  It was a lightweight 1000g head, which will pair nicely with my "Genuine Norlund."  If anyone knows the maker of the head below, I'd be appreciative.

Enjoy your axe, and do watch how to correctly sharpen them if you're not familiar.

The link below is a good read and very informative for axe care.
http://www.timbergadgets.com/axe-handle-guide-which-oil-to-use/#:~:text=once%20a%20year.-,Maintaining%20Your%20Axe%20Handle,oil%20and%20let%20it%20dry.

Finally finished up hanging this small axe head today and decided to add a leather lanyard, mostly for looks.  Thought about painting it to match a nice 200a fount, but decided to go with the original look.
Next project is to get some nice leather to make sheath for it.

IMG_4005.jpg 
IMG_1757.jpg  IMG_1758.jpg
Bob
Quote
Smokey12
Nice work Bob!
Don
Canadian Blues member #26
Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #O177
ICCC Member # 1584
Quote
GCinSC
Blame this on heat, humidity and a bit of rainyish weather.

I have several old manuals for U.S. Rifle Caliber .30 M1903, A3 and A4 both list raw linseed oil for maintenance of walnut wood stocks. 

War Department Technical Manual TM 9-1270. 20 January 1944 page 104.
War Department Field Manual  FM 23-10. 30 September 1943 page 15

Not saying which is better raw or boiled, just offering what's in the referenced manuals.

Best hand ax I have is my Dad's old Plumb BSA. Several handles later and my hand made sheath it's a must take on camping trips.
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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