200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

bowenstudios
I thought some of you all might enjoy this. My grandfather loved knifes, always carried one, and loved to trade them with buddies. But this is one that always made an impression growing up. We actually thought it was lost/stolen until my mom found it last weekend. 

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This is not a real mark 1 trench knife, but I like its story a little better. Apparently a guy my grandfather knew would cast these during WWII or before and give them to soldiers to take. The story is he was making them by the bushel basket, probably at one of the metal plants in town where I'm guessing he worked. He would make the blade out of old files, and one big difference is the skull cracker nut is brass instead of steal and twice as long. There are also no markings on the grip. I loved holding this as a kid, although it never made it far from the gun case it hung in. It with this luger (turns out it's a walther p38, my grandfather called all 9m pistols luger I guess) were about the only thing he talked about from the war, although I'm not certain he carried this.

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The other knife is one of several like it he had. I think they took a blade from something else and cast an aluminum handle onto them. Although they may have made the blades in his steel factory also. This one is special because he ground grips into it for his hand and used a nail or punch to put his name and hometown on the grip.

There was also a story mom told me of him and a buddy trying to make knifes during training before being deployed. He ended up with bad burns on his leg and transferred to a different unit after leaving the hospital. I wish I had asked more questions, but he didnt really like talking about his time in the army. Except he would talk to my dad, his son in law, who was in Vietnam, he didnt even talk to his own sons much about it.

Anyway, enjoy. These have to go back to my parents for now, but at least we know where they are, and that they're safe.
-Mike
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BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #651
Mil-SpecOps #0651
The Coleman Blue's 243's #154
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outlawmws
Awesome family history stuff right there!  Write down everything anyone can remember 'cause otherwise its all lost...
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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Tgarner01
Neat knives, thanks for sharing the story. Definitely something to be cherished and stories to be passed down.
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Stevenbrown817
Thanks for sharing this. The second knife is really cool especially knowing it was unique to your grandfather.
I have a few things from both of my grandfathers, tools mostly, and an old pair of binoculars my grandmother used for birdwatching.  I still use them from time to time, just to bring back some memories.  
STEVE
ICCC 1552
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mgmlvks
Thanks for sharing such interesting items from your family history!
Mike, ICCC member #1156, Slant Saver Group #011, 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0215, FAS #20 - Confusing Future Generations of Collectors One Lantern at a Time
"In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present"
Francis Bacon
(and - for those who have asked - avatar from postcard and says "Coming Home by Rail".  https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4595/27430282209_39a564be00_z.jpg
 
 
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Gasman64
That's some really neat stuff, Mike, great that you have such items with family history still in the family.  I've been studying WW1, and things from that era are particularly interesting to me.
Steve
ICCC #1012
logoballistol logo 1a.png

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hikerduane
My dad (WW II) mentioned very little about his time, my grandfather (WW I) even less if at all that I recall.  My nephew, nothing about the Gulf War.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves and lanterns, who's counting.
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outlawmws
What I've found is the foot solders and other front line troops (pilots etc) don't.  Mechanics and support behind the lines?  More open.

Dad was a navy fighter plane mechanic (Korea) and talked some.  My uncle, was in WWII in the marines in the pacific - not a Peep.  Similar for the Vietnam and Gulf war vets I know.
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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macwacs
I have one of the original 1918 knuckle knives. Learned something here that if I should ever run into one without the date cast into the handle that it is actually a real WW2 made vintage knuckle knife and not something else.
They made reproductions a few years ago of the 1918 but can easily be told from an original. They have stainless blades and lack the overall quality of a vintage piece. There were two makers during the first world war but very few of the ones produced stateside were issued untill WW2. Often times the WW2 issued ones will have the brass guard ground off so that it will lay flatter next to the body when on a belt. Many were used by airborne troops in WW2
RMW
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