200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Tgarner01
Everytime I work on one of these newer style F/A tubes I try to wrap my head around how they can allow an air mixture sometimes and not others without a metering rod. Maybe I just cannot take my mind away from how a carburetor works? Working on a 229 today with the brass F/A tube, no metering rod, fixed fuel orfice, and fixed air orfice... Why would this not allow the same fuel and air mixture at all times? Must be some kind of Coleman magic..
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Hot Diggity
Sounds density based.  Look up slant operation.  I think it's the same basic operation.
Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
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Tgarner01
Hot Diggity wrote:
Sounds density based.  Look up slant operation.  I think it's the same basic operation.

Your correct, mine is made pretty much the same but with a removable fuel orfice
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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zoomkat
"Must be some kind of Coleman magic.."

It is clever and careful engineering. The patent for the plastic fuel/air pickup tube lanterns describes the "magic". It is basically a balanced system between the orifice in the generator and the orifice in the fuel pickup tube. The orifice in the fuel pickup tube is sized small enough in a "sweet spot" that allows both a non flooding controlled startup, and just large enough to supply fuel for normal running like the earlier lanterns. With these lanterns the startup is with a full open fuel control valve. This allows a starting mix of fuel/air to be sent thru the generator for lighting. When the generator heats the fuel starts vaporizing increasing pressure in the generator and reducing fuel flow to the generator. When the fuel flow slows, the fuel orifice can then supply enough fuel to flood the bottom of the fuel pickup tube just like the fuel pickup tubes of the older lanterns.
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Tgarner01
zoomkat wrote:
"Must be some kind of Coleman magic.."

It is clever and careful engineering. The patent for the plastic fuel/air pickup tube lanterns describes the "magic". It is basically a balanced system between the orifice in the generator and the orifice in the fuel pickup tube. The orifice in the fuel pickup tube is sized small enough in a "sweet spot" that allows both a non flooding controlled startup, and just large enough to supply fuel for normal running like the earlier lanterns. With these lanterns the startup is with a full open fuel control valve. This allows a starting mix of fuel/air to be sent thru the generator for lighting. When the generator heats the fuel starts vaporizing increasing pressure in the generator and reducing fuel flow to the generator. When the fuel flow slows, the fuel orifice can then supply enough fuel to flood the bottom of the fuel pickup tube just like the fuel pickup tubes of the older lanterns.


I guess that kind of makes sense that vaporizing in the generator would create a pressure difference. Seems that it would be more problematic than they are. I've never had one of the newer F/A assemblies fail, so there's no room for me to complain about them. Just like to know how things work I guess ðŸ˜
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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zoomkat
"I guess that kind of makes sense that vaporizing in the generator would create a pressure difference."

That is the same way the older lanterns work. The only thing that is limiting fuel flow to the generator is the generator internal pressure. The newer lanterns can be a little more interesting on startup, but no need to call 911.
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GoCamping
@zoomkat

You absolutely did a very nice detailed explanation on the operation principles.  Balanced Engineering  seems to be the key for the operation  of these lanterns. No metering rod means less moving parts to produce .... and for us to have to clean.   Yet these little guys really know how to put out the light. The operation seems almost simplistic when you think about it.  Coleman Engineering ... I like it ! 
Chris

Looking for any Lantern dated "10-89" (B/D lantern for my Son)
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gwillmot
Tgarner01 wrote:


I've never had one of the newer F/A assemblies fail, so there's no room for me to complain about them. 😁

I would imagine that you are the exception, rather then the rule ..... at least by my experience!
lucky.jpg 
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Tgarner01
gwillmot wrote:

I would imagine that you are the exception, rather then the rule ..... at least by my experience!
lucky.jpg 

It's true altho I've probably only owned 10 or so... Maybe more counting the 222/226/229 lanterns. Seems 90 percent of the metering rod lanterns I have to disassemble to clean the metering system to work correctly. Stoves the same way. Only issues I've had with adjustables are a couple melted eccentric blocks and someone leaving a Schrader valve out of another.. 
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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zoomkat
"Coleman Engineering ... I like it !"

I think it makes the lanterns more affordable to make so they maintain a price point where they can still sell them. After I digested the patent information, I went and bought a 285 from Amazon on winter sale for $59 including plastic case and shipping. I'm impressed that it is compact, light weight, and does what it is supposed to do in a simple way. I am now in a quandary about getting a Coleman 2/4 person "instant" tent, or one with the 6'+ center height. With the instant tent, one just throws it like a Frisbee and it is a tent before it hits the ground. Camp set up and mixing a cocktail within minutes.
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Sam McCord
https://www.colemancollectorsforum.com/post/newer-lanterns-theory-of-operation-5468271?pid=1270012724&highlight=plastic+fuel+tube

Hey Toby, here's some reading for ya. 
Doug

Why is there never enough time to do it right but always enough time to do it over?
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Tgarner01
Thanks Doug, now that you pointed me back to it, I remember reading that several months back. Funny how I forget things. A lot of good info in that thread. 

Hope all is well in Pilot Point AK
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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