200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
Willyh
Hello members,

I'm new here and new to fuel lanterns. I am a vintage stove collector, and I believe this is the next logical step in this addiction.

I recently purchased 2 beautiful lanterns that I have yet to receive. A 1946 empire brass 237 and a 1955 chrome 249. I have a few questions:

1. I have K1 kerosene and Jet-A1 fuel in storage. I know the Jet-A1 fuel has a small percentage of ethanol as an additive. In an emergency or camping situation, I would want to use these lanterns for heat and light. I know they burn very efficiently, so would there be any toxic fumes other than CO that me and my family would have to worry about in an enclosed space. I would obviously have some air ventilation.

2. For the generators, it seems that the 249's are very hard to come by. Is there a way to fully restore them if needed. I would hate to end up having a heavy 249 expensive paperweight. Is there a website where I can buy NOS 249 generators besides ebay?

3. Besides the generator and the fuel cap rubber washer, are there any other components that I should be replacing before using the lamps? Maybe the pump leather cap?

Thank you kindly,

William.
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Northman49
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She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
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Willyh
Thank you. Please send me a link on how to restore a generator.
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Chucker
Welcome William. 

I suppose you could search "clean generator" in the search function but most are painfully simple to clean...gently tighten the generator in a bench vise, use a propane torch to heat the generator body just so you see it turning red, grab the gen with a pair of pliers and drop into cold water. Repeat until all the internal parts come out. this is called the heat and quench.

Clean those parts with either chemicals like carb spray and fine steel wool and small wire brush - or a torch but careful some internals are made of pot metal or aluminum and can melt apart. Reassemble. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Willyh
Chucker wrote:
Welcome William. 

I suppose you could search "clean generator" in the search function but most are painfully simple to clean...gently tighten the generator in a bench vise, use a propane torch to heat the generator body just so you see it turning red, grab the gen with a pair of pliers and drop into cold water. Repeat until all the internal parts come out. this is called the heat and quench.

Clean those parts with either chemicals like carb spray and fine steel wool and small wire brush - or a torch but careful some internals are made of pot metal or aluminum and can melt apart. Reassemble. 


Thank you for the reply. I tried the search function, but could not fine what I was looking for. I have a butane torch. I'm assuming this would be fine as well?

Are the generators always serviceable, or are there situations where you need to buy a new one?
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Chucker
Willyh wrote:


Thank you for the reply. I tried the search function, but could not fine what I was looking for. I have a butane torch. I'm assuming this would be fine as well?

Are the generators always serviceable, or are there situations where you need to buy a new one?


You are welcome and yes, most are but some generator's just give you fits and there is always the broken pricker wires - very susceptible to breakage. One more thing, before heating the generator remove the tip - it unthreads. It's a good safety precaution. 

The common and usually least expensive models are typically from newer lanterns like the 290, 295, 285, 288, and 639's. Our host usually has the older 220/228 and 200a/242 gen's in stock as well. 

The two kero model's in your title are wonderful runner's but as you may have realized those gen's can get pricey. Both are on my list of favorite kero's and I own a few of them. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Willyh
Chucker,

Perfect. Thank you.

As for running the lamps inside my house or a tent. Do you see any issues besides CO? I will always have some outdoor air circulation.

William.
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Chucker
My opinion, I would not run anything using my air (oxygen) while sleeping, home or tent. That being said I heat up my tent and camper in the cold weather and winter with a lantern - propane and kerosene seem to be the easiest on my nose. 

In the house, just crack a window. Frankly when we run our kero Rayo's or Perfection heaters we have windows closed but I know they will only run 2-3 hours before bed. I don't run Coleman fuel for long in my house (unless it's just a test fire of a GPA) since my wife's sniffer is more sensitive and it will bother her. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Willyh
Thanks again.
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Willyh
Is there anything in the pump assembly that might need to be replaced?
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Chucker
Maybe. The pump cups usually only need some light oiling - a good leather oil is fine or even household 3-in-1 oil. Knead the oil into the leather.

That and the fuel cap seal usually need replacing unless someone else has gone through it in the past 10 years or so. Today's 'rubber' is very resilient. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Willyh
Thanks very much Chucker. Really appreciate the help!
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