200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

pipenfly
Hey, All! I though that I considered myself to be strictly a stovie but I found a few lanterns over the weekend and scooped them up.
The first one just reached drinking age but it's clean and only required mantels. My first lantern, a 288.
P_20200622_134837_vHDR_Auto~4.jpg 
Next, I found a pair of 220's. One is from 1980 marked "K" and the other from 1964 marked "F". The 220K works pretty well. I just had to free up the check valve with carb cleaner, blow it out and clean out the fount. There was fresh RUG and lots of dirt inside so it took a little doing but it shed some light.
P_20200621_123902_vHDR_Auto~4.jpg 
The last of this little heap is a 220F. The tank had some very old RUG and varnish so I think it's a good candidate for a tear down. I'd like to see what's inside so I can understand exactly how they work.
P_20200621_094121_vHDR_Auto~4.jpg  I've been searching for a teardown how-to on the 220 but can't find any. Should I just follow the two mantle procedure on the OCP site for this one?
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mgmlvks
Those are all solid lanterns - good work getting them into your hands!

The OCP tear down is the go-to tutorial - BUT - it is a total tear down and most lanterns do not need all of everything addressed.  Key issues that may be able to be avoided

https://www.oldcolemanparts.com/resources/re_2lant.php
  1. Check Valve - you may be (almost certainly) able to clean it with carb cleaner, a bamboo shish-kabob skewer and some time.  If it actually needs removal - get the "tool" or find someone who has one to do it.  Saves a ton of aggravation.
  2. Main Valve.  Unless the valve is exceptionally hard to turn or leaks, there is no need to completely disassemble.  There are some small parts that can get easily lost, and the graphite may or may not survive the experience.  Often times moderate heat on the valve stem solves a lot of problems.
  3. Burner tubes.  These can be as frustrating as checkvalves.  Spend quality time running pipe cleaner or frayed lamp cord into all the nooks and crannies, but typically no need to remove the burner tubes or the air tube unless there are known issues.  You run a real risk of scarring or crushing the tubes.  Check for screens on the burner caps, and they are easier to remove than the burners!
Mike, ICCC member #1156, Slant Saver Group #011, 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0215, FAS #20 - Confusing Future Generations of Collectors One Lantern at a Time
"In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present"
Francis Bacon
(and - for those who have asked - avatar from postcard and says "Coming Home by Rail".  https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4595/27430282209_39a564be00_z.jpg
 
 
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The Warrior
Congrats man, nice haul. I consider myself more of a stovie as well, but own a few lanterns.
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pipenfly
Thanks for the tips, Mike! I figured a total tear down would be necessary but if not, that's great. I'll go step by step. I have a check valve tool so if that part gives me any problems, I'll be ok. I've already had to take out and clean some gunked up and nasty check valves from stoves. Thanks for the Cliff's notes on a teardown though. I'm sure it will save me a lot of trouble in the future. More importantly, it'll save some lanterns from my fumbling hands!
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pipenfly
Thanks Warrior! Good to see you here!
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Ridge Runner
Nice! You’ve got a couple (soon to be three) solid runners there. And, an F is certainly a good “older-style” one to practice on.

— L.J.
Looking for 10/2015 & 1/2020 B-Day Lanterns
I love the smell of naphtha in the morning!
"Ain’t no need to watch where I’m goin’; just need to know where I’ve been" -Tow Mater

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Bumpkin 95
The tutorial is great. The lantern lab channel on YouTube has a good how to video. He is a member here and his info is solid and can be trusted. Otherwise there are some doozies that don’t know squat on there. Good luck with the 220F it might make a lantern loon out of you yet😀
  • Lee
  • Milspec Syndicate member #1995
  • Like a lantern just hanging out
  • ICCC member #1927
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pipenfly
Thank you! I will check the tutorials and the YouTube channel. I've seen some doozie youtube attempts at fixing all manner of things. It's good to know there are a few people who have good and solid experience on there. I may have to tear into the F a little more. The generator is now clean. I managed to keep the spring with the heat and quench method. I might be able to salvage the cardboard too. I have another cardboard tube just in case. She holds pressure. Air comes out of the burners but no fuel yet. It'll be a project for another time. Let me ask, is this the original globe or a replacement?
P_20200624_055018_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  It says Pyrex Made In The USA.
I appreciate the pointers. It's good to give these things a new lease on life.
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scl
good ones.
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Bumpkin 95
They usually say Coleman under the Pyrex. Someone more knowledgeable might have the answer on what it is from
  • Lee
  • Milspec Syndicate member #1995
  • Like a lantern just hanging out
  • ICCC member #1927
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Ridge Runner
The globe looks like it would have originally come on a Sears lantern.

Might be worth setting that one someplace safe and getting a more common or even a period correct globe at least to run with. Or you could get a Sears which might have the Coleman globe you need on it and swap ‘em out 🙂

The F’s globe should have the red Coleman parallelogram under the Pyrex printing. 

— L.J.
Looking for 10/2015 & 1/2020 B-Day Lanterns
I love the smell of naphtha in the morning!
"Ain’t no need to watch where I’m goin’; just need to know where I’ve been" -Tow Mater

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pipenfly
Thanks Ridge Runner. This broken globe was on the K when I bought it.
P_20200625_052051_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  Maybe that was original to it? Was looking on OCP at globes a few days ago. I saw the one that's marked Made In China and I asked myself, "Who would want a globe that's made in China?" After the feedback here, I found a reason to buy a globe that's made in China, I also, obviously need a period correct 220F globe and a Sears lantern to match the Pyrex globe. So, is this where the rabbit hole begins, folks? Because I'm pretty sure I just fell in!
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Ridge Runner
No prob. The broken globe is the correct one for your K. Note the missing PYREX printing. It went away on the later models.

The correct one for your F is a pretty common (albeit, out of production) globe and would have looked like this:

9999BC66-E4B3-43FC-B345-3123571EDC33.jpeg 

Some folks use the MIC globes for camping or just plain running, saving the more hard-to-come-by or originals for displaying their lantern. There are a couple methods to remove the MIC lettering if it annoyed you.

— L.J.
Looking for 10/2015 & 1/2020 B-Day Lanterns
I love the smell of naphtha in the morning!
"Ain’t no need to watch where I’m goin’; just need to know where I’ve been" -Tow Mater

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williamlee111
Bumpkin 95 wrote:
The tutorial is great. The lantern lab channel on YouTube has a good how to video. He is a member here and his info is solid and can be trusted. Otherwise there are some doozies that don’t know squat on there. Good luck with the 220F it might make a lantern loon out of you yet😀

+1 On the lantern Lab channel
Not looking for anything. I have too much already, my wife says. 
 
 Bill
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10gage
pipenfly wrote:
Thanks Ridge Runner. This broken globe was on the K when I bought it.
P_20200625_052051_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg  Maybe that was original to it? Was looking on OCP at globes a few days ago. I saw the one that's marked Made In China and I asked myself, "Who would want a globe that's made in China?" After the feedback here, I found a reason to buy a globe that's made in China, I also, obviously need a period correct 220F globe and a Sears lantern to match the Pyrex globe. So, is this where the rabbit hole begins, folks? Because I'm pretty sure I just fell in!


yes because if your ocd like me everything has to be correct. And now you need a sears.
James sizemore
milspec syndicate #1941
slant savers #68
quicklite crew#43
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pipenfly
I figured I would just continue this thread as I finished these lanterns up. The 220K has been taken as far as I am comfortable taking it. I didn't repaint but here it is with a little less rust, a lot more function and the correct globe (that is in one piece). This is the globe that was generously offered to new forum members by @hansblix1 . Many thanks for helping me along on my first lantern project!

P_20200708_101436_vHDR_Auto~2.jpg And here it's all lit up, clean and functioning properly.
P_20200708_203521_LL~2.jpg 
Thank you again to hansblix1 for really putting the cherry on top of this first lantern project. And thanks to all the posters of the forum that put all this great info in one place. This is truly a fantastic forum!
Now, on to the F!
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grob
Here is a method from Greg with additions of mine and a link to Timm's method which is similar. Greg's link is gone.
Gar

To remove put a large crescent wrench in a vice. Remove the generator and put the nut back on to protect the threads. Remove the air/burner tube assembly and place entire lantern upside down with the wrench tight on the sides of the cleaner assembly. A strap wrench may be needed to loosen a tight fount. Wrap the fount with bike inner tube rubber to protect it if needed. Count how many turns out, so you can return the same on reassembly. The whole assembly comes out of the fount to dismantle the rest.

To replace put the fuel valve into the fount, thread the fuel valve in and place in a vice upside down and tighten. Count the turns! You might want to protect the fuel valve from the vice jaws with rubber, wood or such. I use aluminum angles. The fuel valve should be 'clocked' 90 degrees between the filler cap on the left and the pump tube on the right. Place the frame rest/collar over the fuel valve. To replace the cleaner assembly into the fuel valve, put a 9/16" deep socket over the fuel valve nut and stem, then place the socket in a vice while supporting the fount underneath to keep the fuel valve assembly from moving while tightening the cleaner assembly into it. Again, count the turns. No thread sealer is needed. The threads are tapered. The socket also fits nicely into the hole in the frame rest/collar to keep it centered while tightening. On a 228B there is a short, threaded air tube extension below the cleaner assembly that was threaded up too far and I backed it out for room for the main air tube to thread down. The air tube on later models is one piece. Make sure the hole in the air tube lines up with the threaded hole for the screw in the cleaner assembly. It is possible to crush the soft brass air tube with the screw if not lined up, believe me! -Gary

Timm's:
https://www.colemancollectorsforum.com/post/220228-disassemblythe-gunhippie-way-9720462?pid=1306505416
Boy, I say boy... you're about to exceed the limitations of my medication.
- Foggy
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Chucker
The advice above is very helpful (like Mike's). However if you're on vacation or out of town, you find some lantern's and want to see if they work, you will usually just have to check these basic things to fire it up:

1. The fuel cap gasket. Is it still flexible or does it need replacing? Take a fuel rated O-ring or flat gasket and problem solved. 
2. The pump cup. Most really just need to be soaked and kneaded in light oil. Neats foot oil is popular here.
3. A known working generator. Many lantern's have gen's that will work. It's just one common trouble spot. Many can be worked on to get them going,      many cannot. 

Fuel it up and go. That's it! 
Chuck
"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, Sweet to the soul and healing to the bones." Proverbs 16:24
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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pipenfly
Oh, man! You folks are great! Those break down step by steps and tips are exactly why I love this place so much. New to me and different ways to do things is why I come here.
Practicing on these commons has taught me a lot. I've become pretty good with the stoves. Chasing an even burn and an efficient blue flame, I believe, put me in the right frame of mind for getting the lanterns to also work efficiently. Breaking 220's down, cleaning and putting them back together isn't very difficult any more.
I do hope to get to the point where I don't need any type of thread sealant. I'm not there yet. I've been getting tiny air leaks without sealant. I'll try marking and counting turns because I would prefer not to use any sealer if possible.
Also, I need to get my citric acid to water to heat to timing ratio tuned a little better in the brass department. Getting steel de-rusted and shiny is simple but my brass is turning pink and splotchy pretty quick.
I'd like to get myself to the point on these commons where I can actually get them working properly and looking right. I'm aiming for restoration so if I come across something rare, I can actually do it justice. I'm glad the commons are so easy to come by. Practice makes perfect.
Anyway, many thanks again and apologies for my long winded-ness. 
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