200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
DougA
Hi there,

First post and new member here.  I've been over on the Heatburner site for several months now having gotten into the kerosene heaters after discovering a few Perfection products at the family cottage that were right under my nose all my life but for whatever reason were never used by my dad.  That has led to the purchase of a pair of Perfection Firelights and a Rayo lamp to add to the kerosene "toys."

That right under the nose thing also applies to a bunch of Coleman lanterns, which is why I joined up here.  It would appear that I have a pair of 237s, a 249 and a double mantle gas only model on which I cannot find a model number.  They have all been at the cabin "forever," but not used in eons.  I remember one or two of the 237s being used when I was quite small, but that was a long time ago.  Here's a pic of them in their as-found state, along with a little Dietz Comet lantern that I also came across:

colemans sm.jpg 

All of the Colemans need work as the main valve is stuck on all but the 249, most still have old, funky fuel in them, and all need a really good cleanup.  I have brought home the mantle-less 237 on the left in the photo, along with the 249 and the Dietz.  The other two will follow as the summer progresses.

Dates on the 237s appear to be missing or are badly obscured in the plating.  The 249 has a December 1950 date, and I'll have to look at the double mantle guy again to see about dates.  All appear to have original globes.  All have been well used; all of the kerosene Colemans have the crackled porcelain tops that I read are characteristic of the hotter burning kero models.

I am doing a lot of reading and learning on this site and will be looking to refurb all of these guys and get them working again.  When that will happen remains to be seen; like most of us, I have way too many projects and other hobbies already, but at the moment I am smelling a good winter project.

Also in the grand collection at the cabin are three Coleman pressure stoves along with a later propane model, but don't ask me models at this point.  They were all our main stoves at the cabin over the years.

Oh, and there's also a 1979 200A here at home, too!

I'd love to hear any pointers or tips about these particular lanterns, and maybe someone has an idea what the correct model number of the double mantle white gas lantern may be.

Cheers,

DougA
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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Kansas John
Family heirlooms are great!  That big hat looks like a 228b to me. Welcome aboard!
John M. Lawrence, KS
ICCC #1431

Looking for a 214 kero and REI single burner anniversary stove as well as any Coleman born on date 10/77, 1/80
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DougA
Thanks, I found it odd that there is no model number to be found in any of the usual places, most esp. the collar ... but then, I am a bit new to this, [wink]
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
dpatten
DougA wrote:
Thanks, I found it odd that there is no model number to be found in any of the usual places, most esp. the collar ... but then, I am a bit new to this, [wink]


When that 228B was made 80 years ago there weren't that many models of Coleman lantern.
Dennis the Peasant

ICCC Member #1337 (Thanks Dean!)
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0086

"One of the sanest, surest, and most generous joys of life comes from being happy over the good fortune of others."
-R.A. Heinlein-
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1hpycmpr
Welcome from Colorado! Looks like you have an instant collection there! Really nice stuff and for it to be from the family is icing on the cake!
Mark
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cosmogs
Welcome to the forum Doug. Family heirlooms are the best, and you got some real nice ones there! [thumb]


Walking the Kerosene trail
(Just west of Mica Valley)
Geir, Norway

8 lanterns to go! [angel]

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lanternman
Welcome to the forum Doug. You will definitely have the lantern collecting bug now.
Check the collar on your big hat lantern, it may have something on it. You also might try a
magnifying glass to see the dates on your 237's. Can't wait to see your progress on them.

[Smilie6]
Steve- ICCC Member # 1244 Albertville, Alabama
Lanternman
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Scouter_Angus
Doug, welcome to the forum!

I notice that you are in New York. You should see if you can make the True North Gathering at Steve Cullins' cabin the last weekend in September. He's in Hannibal, upstate New York. It is a great time, and a whole bunch of us collector dudes, and our families, show up with some really neat stuff to share.

Angus.
Angus

There is no armour made that can withstand the Truth. Karsa Orlong
ICCC # 1256
#001 in the Canadian Blues Syndicate (Syndicate Supreme Leader)
#058 in the Coleman Blues Syndicate
Looking for Canadian lanterns 8/30, 10/34, 4/67, 3/64, and any GPA for July 2004.

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Vikingson_1
Welcome aboard and you have some fine fettling projects there.
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BargainFinder
Awesome. Welcome from the Pacific NW! Family legacy pieces rock. Let alone them including 237s. I haven't seen any of those hunting in the wild. Very kewl.
Ann

* * * * * *
ICCC #1308
Greetings from Puget Sound!

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Hunter
Great line up you have there and welcome to the forum. The 228B should be stamped on the bottom just after Wichita Ks.
Dave
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DougA
Thanks for all the comments so far.  I have been reading up on the 228Bs since that lantern was identified as one and saw where the model # should be.  I'll have a look next week when I get back to the cabin and also see about the date on it.  What's also interesting about that 228B is on the bottom in grease pencil is written the name of a friend of my grandfather's, so I guess this lantern was originally that chap's.  How it came to be at our cabin all these years later I am sure we will never know, though I do know this gent was a fishing buddy of my grandad's and did visit the cabin the early years of my grandfather's ownership.  It maybe got left behind by mistake or perhaps he just gave it to Grandpa.
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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rangler
Hello and Welcome!
---Randall----ICCC member #1143---
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JMull
DOUG:  Welcome from Central New Jersey.  You're off to a good start here --> You show PICTURES!!
JIM MULL - from Jersey: #7 in Sears, #115 in Turds, #1948 in Mil-Spec, #48 in BernzOmatic, #1 in Cecilia's Heart.
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Legs
Hello from The Oregon Coast! Nice bunch O nickel you have there. Look like you have yourself some projects to get you through the winter. Go slow refurbishing them and consult this forum often. Lots of knowledge here. Try the SEARCH engine for technical inquiries.

Don

Let it burn....        
Don... Oregon
USA 236 Syndicate #003  Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0126  The Coleman Blue's 243's #097
Coleman Slant Saver 007  ICC #1438   NRA #147137741
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DougA
Quote:
You're off to a good start here --> You show PICTURES!!


Lol, thanks.  I've been on too many other forums where the motto is "pix or it didn't happen."

Next week at the cabin I'll dig out the stoves and get pix of them to share.  There's a wide two-burner, and two small ("regular" size) two-burners, one with a red tank/font the other with a round copper/bronze colored tank/font.  I'll get model #s and dates.  I think we still have the box for the wide two-burner stove, I was pondering on that this afternoon on where the box may be squirreled away.

We are still using a pair of 2-gallon Coleman jugs, a blue one with "Royalite" base ("Guaranteed for the life of the jug") from 1962 (which is older than me!) and a brown one marked "6  47," so I'm assuming that's 1964, but seems like I remember it being purchased new around 1970.  Anyway, those two and a 1-gallon greenie make the five or six jaunts each year to the cabin with our potable water.  There's also a pair of Sno-Lite coolers, a 5254 "Lo boy" and a 5255.  The 5254 goes each time to the cabin to get the chilled perishables there and kept cold until the propane fridge gets down to temp.  The 5255 used to do cabin duty until cars started downsizing in the early 80s, which is when we got the 5254.  The 5255 is still in use around home, though.

Yup, I've been around Coleman stuff all my life!
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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DougA
Quote:
Go slow refurbishing them and consult this forum often. Lots of knowledge here. Try the SEARCH engine for technical inquiries.


Yes, I have been doing a LOT of reading here the last couple of days, seeing just what I am heading into.  I have been doing searches on my specific models and reading the threads about them.  Priceless info here for everyone, esp. newbies.
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
DougA
OK, gang, so what do I have here with this 228?  I brought it home from the cottage and just got some close-up photos of it.  I cannot find a model number on the bottom in the places mentioned.  Also the date is a bit nebulous, as it could be 8  6  or  9   8. 

It appears to be in decent condition.  I pumped it up and it appears to hold air, at least it hissed when I loosened the fuel cap.  I think the valve and assorted plumbing need attention since I couldn't hear it hissing when I opened the valve.  Not surprising.

Anyway, any thoughts the experts might have on this is most appreciated.  I also got photos of the 237 that is currently at home and I'll get those ready to post, too.

228-01.jpg 

228-02.jpg 

228-03.jpg 

228-04.jpg 

228-05.jpg 

228-06.jpg 

DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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GForceKaras
228B based on the cotter pins and bottom stampings.
Thien TAS member #2750 / Sears Collectors Club #1
Looking for a Sears Ted Williams lantern (FOUND! Thanks Sean!)
"The dreams of youth are the regrets of maturity" - Darkness
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DougA
And here's one of the 237s.  Note the bottom date is very difficult to make out.
237-01.jpg 

237-02.jpg 

237-03.jpg 


It looks like a "2" on the left, but the numeral on the right is completely obscured.

237-04.jpg 
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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Matt98B5
Wow!  I wish I stumbled upon that kind of family collection!  Good luck cleaning them up, and welcome to the forum!
Matt

John 3:17-18 - For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. He who believes in Him is not condemned; but he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. (NKJV)
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Gand28
Welcome to the forum, Matt.  Take a look at the thread below regarding the date of your 228B.  Is it stamped "Lamp and Stove" or Lamp & Stove"?  Don't be fooled if the 8 looks upside down (small circle on the bottom), as the stamp is often flipped upside down in error.  The year is usually on the left, but not always.  You have one of those nebulous dates that could be '38 or '39, but probably doesn't really matter either way...it's still a great lantern with an original globe!

http://www.colemancollectorsforum.com/post/220b228b-earlylate-info-aka-220a228a-3181799?pid=30704536#post30704536

Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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DougA

Thanks, Greg ... and it's Doug, Matt was the last responder before you.

This 228B has Lamp "AND" Stove on the bottom, and thanks for the info about the possibly inverted "8."  It looks like this is a 1938.  Cool!

As for stumbling on the collection, it was a case of discovering what is really been in front of me all of my life.  Except for the 249 these have all been hanging from nails in the rafters of the back room of the family cottage, which is kind of a mud room/work room/attic/catch-all kind of room.  So I always knew they were there but never gave them much of closer look until recently; I just knew they were old Coleman lanterns and that some might be the kerosene kind.  The 249 was a surprise as that was in another part of the cabin, sitting on the floor, behind other stuff, and I had no idea it was there until a couple of weeks ago.

It will be fun to get these going again, though I doubt I'll take them back to the cottage.  There really isn't much use for them there and never really was.  I think these were remnants of my grandfather's fishing expeditions in the years before he owned the cabin.  I can recall these old Colemans being used probably only a handful of times when I was a kid, and I think it was just one of the 237s.  My dad would fire it up more for heat than anything else on a cold evening.  I remember the brilliant light out of them more than the heat.  When the 237 became too troublesome to use -- probably because it needed a good cleaning after 40-some years -- my dad bought a new 200A around 1980 which I also have, and that probably got used only a handful of times as well.  We have the box for that one.  Anyway, we don't have much outdoor use for them at the cabin as we aren't night fisherman or do much of any nighttime boating etc. and these really aren't terribly safe to use indoors, esp. in a 100-yr-old wood cabin!

Gotta get them fettled first before making decisions on how/where to use them!  I still have one more 237 to transport home.

DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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Rocinron
Nice lanterns, nearly mint, especially after some TLC.

Welcome to the forum.
Ron
Well, ain't this place a geographical oddity-two weeks from everywhere!
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0085
If it makes fire, and light, and heat....
ICCC # 1336
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #067

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DougA
Well, I sort of started in on the collection today.  I decided to see if the 1979 200A (not pictured above) still worked.  It's, of course, the newest and had the most recent use, but that was more than 20 years ago.  It still has Coleman Fuel in it and I saw a comment in another thread that "CF lasts forever" so I thought, why not give it a go.

It more or less fired right off but wasn't burning right.  I couldn't tell if it was starving for fuel or air and decided it was air as it would glow a bit better when the wind would blow (I was outside).  I decided to have a go at pulling the frame off and checking the air tube.  Sure enough, I could see the spider webs inside it!  So I ran a stranded wire up it a few times and put it back together and tried again.  Oh, and I cleaned the globe and vent while they were off.  I got the frame back on and managed to do all that without breaking the mantle since I don't have any extras on hand.

It now burns brighter, but not for long.  I appear to have a fuel problem because when it quits I can hear air hissing but not the gurgle of fuel.  From what I have read and am slowly beginning to understand about the operation of these things I believe I have a fuel pickup problem down at the bottom of the F/A tube.  If I let the lantern sit for a while then it will light and run but only for a short time.  That seems to say that fuel is slowly seeping into the F/A tube but not flowing like it should be.

So I guess I need to get into my first tear-down, to at least pull the F/A tube and clean it up well.  That was another reason I decided to start with the 200A ... practice on the newer, more "disposable" lantern before I get into the old nickel guys.

Updates as they become available.
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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CaptainFantastic
Good luck Doug! This new hobby you have is addictive. Trust me. I know.

Ian
Ian - Looking for these dates 7/82, 7/92, 8/93, 9/03, 11/05, 5/17
ICCC #1480 | ICCC co-webmaster

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DougA
I have successfully dismantled a Coleman lantern, fixed it, put it back together ... and it works!  Never done that before!

This afternoon I had at the 1979 200A.  I removed everything down to the valve and put it in a vise and got the valve mechanism and F/A tube out.  And I was right about the problem with it ... it wasn't getting fuel.  When I got the works removed from the font I could see the rod sticking out of the bottom of the F/A tube.  I turned the valve and ... nothing!  The rod didn't move.  Aha!

I removed the F/A tube and took out the rod and found it all full of varnish, not surprisingly.  Some quick work with steel wool took care of that.  While I had it apart I also hit the pricker rod with the steel wool as it also had some varnish on it, though wasn't stuck.  I debated putting the entire valve assembly and F/A tube in something like lacquer thinner but decided to leave well enough alone.  The lantern appeared to be operating OK except for the fuel delivery situation and cleaning up the F/A tube rod should have taken care of that.

Everything was put back together ... and no parts were left over, lol.  Valve assembly back on the font and clocked reasonably well.  It's a few degrees off where it started but it was as far as I could get it without really leaning into it and I didn't want to risk damaging anything.  Generator put back, burner frame, globe, vent and finally the bail.  It lit fairly easily and came up just the way a GPA lantern should.  I let it run about 10 minutes or so and it did well.  Pic below.  I am just pleased as all get-out to have done this because I have been around GPAs all my life but have never tried anything like this before, nor have seen anyone do it other than on this forum.

220a-01.jpg 

I forgot to mention in the little bit of fiddling around with the 200A I did yesterday I fixed the check valve.  When I went to pump it up it was losing pressure as soon as I would take my thumb off the pump so the CV wasn't checking.  I removed the plunger and center rod and poked the check valve with a stiff wire and it started working again.  So there were a few issues with this lantern and they all seem to have been resolved.  This forum rocks, since I was able to read up on all the various things to look for, how to disassemble the lantern, read up on how they work, etc. etc. and apply all that to this lantern.

On to the nickel guys!
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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danstuff
Get a check valve remover as soon as you can!! Best thing I ever bought! You will use it on your other lanterns for sure. Just type in check valve remover on this site!! Good luck and nice find from your Gpa !!
Dan M. Wilson
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young74
I love to see those 200's heat up and turn the top nearly black!,
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DougA
It has been so long since this lantern was fired that I had forgotten that it did that.  It doesn't have a lot of hours on it.  It was purchased new in 1980 and we brought it home from the cottage in 1995 and it hasn't been used since.  It was probably used no more than 10-15 hours from 1980-1995.

When I had it all back together and got it lit and running, outside of course on the picnic table as pictured, my mom was nearby on the patio reading the Sunday paper.  When the lantern got really going with its typical hiss/roar going mom said, "That sounds familiar!" 
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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Gand28
Great work, DOUG (sorry about that!).  You earned your first fettling merit badge!  Just wait til you attack that nickel!
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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cosmogs
Congrats on your first successful fettle! [thumb]
Quite a good feeling, and the first one is special, all that feel and flow going on. [cool]


Walking the Kerosene trail
(Just west of Mica Valley)
Geir, Norway

8 lanterns to go! [angel]

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JimDouglasJr
Hi.
So you're getting a lot of welcomes, but not a lot of advice.  Welcome.  Here's advice to get you going and eliminate a lot of guesswork.
There's no magic here, it's all pretty simple.

First and foremost.
Fuel cap seals. Although they may seem to be holding pressure for a while, the seals in the three piece caps (with the screws in them) need to be changed. They are hard and leaking to some degree.  They should hold pressure indefinitely and be soft. They are available and it's the very first thing you do.
Doing this will eliminate this as a poor running issue, and they are absolutely leaking to some degree. 
Single piece (no screw) caps are usually still good. Their rubber seals are much thicker and tend to stay softer.

Second. Oil the pumps. It's supposed to be done yearly at least and is a good thing to do to a pump, even if it seems to be working. Any motor oil will do for now.

Mantles.  Do not operate with broken, torn, or holed mantles, Superhot jets will ruin your glass globes.  Have plenty on hand. They are fragile and you may sacrifice some while experimenting and during repairs.
Most of us when buying new, buy Peerless mantles from OCP. They are stronger and brighter than current Coleman.

Instant Lite (adds air when lighting to make vapor).  How it works.
Rod based Instant Lite models (Coleman 220, 228, 242, 200A, Some Kamplite, Thermos, etc.).
Read this. It's a complete tutorial on how the rod-based Fuel/Air tube works, how to clean it, and how to test before reassembly for a guaranteed winner.

The Fuel/Air tube is a tube inside a tube inside the fount. Air enters a hole (or opening) near the top of the outer tube, rushes down, then picks up some fuel at the bottom and then goes up the central tube, through the valve and into the generator.  
Opening the valve all the way retracts the rod in the F/A tube, fuel floods in, and the air is cut off. Pretty simple.
 
Even with the rod extended through the fuel pick up orifice (valve 1/4 turn open), SOME fuel needs to pass.
When cleaning it, soaking is not enough. You have to take the Fuel/Air tube off and clean the rod and manually clean the orifice with a toothpick or something.
When reassembling, close the valve (rod extended through the fuel orifice) and be sure you can suck some air out the bottom of the tube. You should be able to get some air with some resistance, but not too much.
Now open valve and visually confirm that the rod retracts (this is what the spring does) and that you can now suck more air out with little resistance.
If all good, reassemble.

Kerosene models and earlier Quick-Lite models.  No air circuit for lighting. Straight fuel pick up and delivery.
These models require pre-heating the generators. Kerosene (Most Coleman and other USA made models) models will have a pre-heat cup on the generator and it will be obvious.
Most lanterns pre-1929 also require a pre-heat, easily done with a lighter.

This will get you started. 






Kyle. Kaptain Kamplite - America's Finest Lantern Fettler.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate and 243 Blues Member #0031 &  J.C. Higgins aficionado.
“If you light a lamp for someone else, it will also brighten your path.” Buddhist quote.  Brand-X Super Hoarder.
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DougA
Quote:
So you're getting a lot of welcomes, but not a lot of advice.  Welcome.  Here's advice to get you going and eliminate a lot of guesswork.  There's no magic here, it's all pretty simple.


Thanks, all advice is appreciated, esp. on the three-piece fuel caps.  I saw some of your posts in other threads which helped me in diagnosing and fixing the F/A rod problem in this 200A.

Any recommendations on which mantle I should use in the 249?  I looked through the mantles offered by our host and see ones listed for the 200A and the 237 but I didn't see any mentioned for the 249.  Or the 228 for that matter.  I am looking to put together an order to have things on hand that I think I'll need.
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
DougA
Another advice question in re the vents of the kerosene lanterns.  The vents on all of these kerosene lanterns are a mess as is common with that type.  If I had them re-done will the newer porcelain hold up better on a kerosene lamp, or should I just wash them up and leave them as evidence of well-used soldiers of the night?  And, who does the porcelain vent work?
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
DougA
The fettling of the first 237 has begun.  Inspired by my success with the 200A I started in on the first 237 lantern.  I was able to get it stripped down fairly quickly and got the valve and fuel pickup assembly off the base easily using my vise.

The main valve on this was stuck so after it was off the font I worked at getting that moving again and got it freed up.  I spun it back onto the font hand tight and pumped a little air into it and find that the pump works, the check valve holds, and the font holds air.  How well is yet to be determined, but I was able to verify air flow through the main valve to the generator seat.

I started in on cleaning up the nickel.  There's lots more to come with that, but I wanted to see how it cleans up and it is looking really good.  Pic below of the disassembled lantern on the work bench:

237-05.jpg 

You can see where I started to clean up the font's exterior.  The generator is apart and you can sort of make out the crusty mess that the pricker rod is, but that should clean up nicely in carb cleaner or lacquer thinner.

The font I see is going to need a "BB dance" to clean up the interior.  Not surprising given that it's a kero lantern.

I also cleaned up the globe.  The pic above doesn't really show just how dirty it was.  Imagine my surprise when I washed it up and dried it off and set it down on the work bench and saw this:

237-06.jpg 

I had been looking for that on the globe since I pulled it off the nail at the cottage and couldn't see it, the dirt was so bad.  I was thinking that the globe was perhaps a later replacement with no markings.

So the project continues.  It'll be a while before this lantern is producing light since I have mantles to order and a lot more work yet to go on it, but the future is looking bright, ahem, for this lantern.

DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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DougA
My box of mantles and a check valve tool ordered from our host arrived while I was back at the cottage and was in the held mail retrieved today.  The check valve tool is awesome!  Thanks for the recommendations to get one.  The CV on the 228B was stuck and resisting the wire poke fix so that was the first CV I tried with the tool.  Came right out and I got the ball bearing freed up and reinstalled the CV.   The 228B now pumps up nicely and air hisses nicely through the generator.  That lantern may need only a good exterior cleanup and new mantles to be functional.

Just because I could I pulled the CV on the 237 I am working on made sure it was clean and put it back.  This evening I also continued to work on cleaning up that 237, having now removed most of the exterior crud from the fount.  It still needs to be polished, but I also need to first do a BB rattle dance of the fount to clean it out.  I am also working on getting the frame cleaned up.

Oh, and on this trip to the cottage I brought back the second 237, so now all the Coleman lanterns are at home awaiting fettling, and I also brought back the original box for the 200A.  My dad infuriatingly kept way too much stuff, including tons of boxes, but in this case it was great to come up with the original box for that lantern.  I need to get a pic of them together.

The project continues ... [smile]
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
DougA
Houston, we have ignition!  The 237 is reassembled, mantled and fired!  It was a rainy, crummy day here which inspires one to putter at the work bench ... so I did.

Pic below of the 237 just after I finished assembling it, and before it was mantled (obviously):

237-07.jpg 

It hasn't looked that good in eons.

Here it is next to its "brother" that just came back from the cottage this week, which makes a good before/after shot:

237-08.jpg 

And finally, the money shot.  For the first time in over 40 years this lantern is lit and operating.  I think the last 237 to be used is the other one since it has a mantle and had a ton of yukky fuel in it whereas this one had no mantle and very little fuel, leading me to believe that wasn't the last one used.  So this one probably hasn't been fired in probably 50 years or more:

237-09.jpg 

On to the next one!
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
Matt98B5
Alright!!  You did a great job cleaning and polishing that lantern!  Can't want to see the rest!
Matt

John 3:17-18 - For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. He who believes in Him is not condemned; but he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. (NKJV)
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DougA
Next up to be fettled is the 249.  Man, is that a filthy little critter!  This evening's project was to photograph and disassemble it and I got into cleaning up the fount.  I shot carb cleaner through the valve and got all sorts of crud flying out of it ... a lot of it green!  The pricker rod was black with lacquered yuck.  Carb cleaner shot through the generator yielded another pile of crud.

Before/after shot of the fount below.  More as the cleanup progresses.

249fount.jpg 
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
pickstr6
Super nice collection and nice work on the cleanups.  I love those green letter sunrise pyrex globes.  Just seems to make the lanterns that have them just a little extra special.

Welcome to the best forum out there.
Lanterns, stoves, & heaters are like tools, you always need more than two of each. Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0036 The Coleman Blue's 243's #051 MilSpecOps #5707
Jeff
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DougA
Progress report on the collection cleanup: progress has slowed a bit since the summer is pretty much over (boo) and I am back to work (more boo, though incoming $$$ again is nice, lol).  Last night the 249 got a new gasket in its fount cap.  The original one was a mess and wouldn't seal properly so a quick order to our host has some new cap gaskets of both sizes now in stock in my growing collection of Coleman parts.  Some more cleanup of the frame was done as well.  The frame is in very good condition and could be used right now, I am just trying to eke out as much of that shiny nickel as possible, [smile] 

Remaining to be done with the 249 is to clean up the generator.  The pricker rod was a thickly lacquered black mess when I took it out.  I have run carb cleaner through the generator but given the state of the pricker I suspect there's more mess inside there than can be cleared by just shooting cleaner through it.  I will soak it in something for a while and see how I proceed from there.  I have been reading up on the 249 generators for hints and helps.  Also to be done is a BB dance in the fount since it's all apart anyway.  The inside doesn't look too bad but it looks like there may be a few crunchies to knock loose and clear out to avoid problems later.

It's interesting that this 249 shows a lot of evidence of having been used a lot, yet I didn't know of its existence until I came across it earlier this summer at the cottage, tucked away in a dark corner.  It's too bad that both my dad and grandad are gone and I can't get the full stories about these lanterns.  I am hoping to find some original paperwork for them somewhere.  My dad never threw anything away so I imagine there's something, somewhere for some/all of them.  I looked around through his stuff at the cottage last week but came up dry.  Which isn't to say there isn't something at home, buried in a box or a bag!!
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
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cosmogs
Wow, both your 237 and 249 came out great, you did a real good job.
And these are not family heirlooms, they are family treasures! [thumb]
Must be extremely nice to have these totally quality items from past generations.


Walking the Kerosene trail
(Just west of Mica Valley)
Geir, Norway

8 lanterns to go! [angel]

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DougA
Thanks, this has turned into quite the fun adventure.  I am amazed by how nicely the nickel is cleaning up on the founts so far, but then the lanterns were stored fairly well.

The 249's generator is proving to be a challenge.  The coils are pretty well stuck inside.  I have been soaking the generator in lacquer thinner and from time to time I take it out and bang the generator on my hand (and not a hard surface since the brass dents easily) and get more crud out of it, and then back into the soak for another few hours.  I may end up having to do the heat and quench trick for getting the coils out for a proper cleaning.  I'll have to see how much crud continues to come out of the generator after each soak.  Once the generator is sorted I can put it all back together and trying lighting it.
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
DougA
The 249 lives!

I had a thought of using a pipe cleaner to try to clean out the generator and the pipe cleaner ended up pulling out the smaller wire coil which was defying my efforts with other tools.  Awesome!  That was a "furry" mess as I figured it probably would be and I was able to get that cleaned up.  The larger coil was still inside the generator tube but I have a small brass brush that I was able to "screw" into the generator a few times to clean that out.  I'd swish the brush in lacquer thinner and then screw it into the genny and then back it out and swish the brush again and then run it back into the gen.  I did that several times until the brush was coming out clean.  The generator was reassembled and the fount given a BB dance.  Then it was time to put it all back together.  Everything went together well and I got some pix during the process so I could post some before/afters.  This lantern was a bit of a mess as found.

Here's the frame before/after:
249compare2.jpg 

And the entire lantern before/after:
249compare.jpg 

Just a little bit of a difference!!  [wink]

I got a mantle tied on and this evening after supper it was off to the patio for some ignition:
249lit.jpg 

It let it run for a good half hour or so while my mom and I sat on the patio and watched the sun set and the lantern took over the darkness, living up to its "Sunshine of the Night" promise.  My mom commented again about the familiar roar and smell of the lantern in operation, remembering the days when my dad would run them at the cottage.  So, another of the family lantern livery burns again.  Three down, two to go.  I think up next for fettling is the other 237.

DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
markds2
Very well done, hasn't that little 249 come up nice? I have one and it is a super bright little lantern.
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cosmogs
Your 249 also look amazing! [thumb]
Great work, and even nicer that you got to share the moment with your mother.


Walking the Kerosene trail
(Just west of Mica Valley)
Geir, Norway

8 lanterns to go! [angel]

Quote
DougA
Today began the tear down and clean up of the second 237 in the family treasure trove of lanterns.  This is the lantern I suspect as having been used last since it still had a mantle and a fair bit of old fuel in it.  Overall, like the other lanterns, it isn't in bad shape to start with:

2372-01.jpg 

It just has that certain patina of the ages, lol.  Removing the bail, vent and globe finds that the frame is in decent shape without too much crud on it, like the 249 (pix above) had:

2372-02.jpg 

On removing the frame and collar I think this lantern must have fireballed at some point in time.  My hands got rather sooted up handling the frame and then I discovered this inside the collar:

2372-03.jpg 

There was also a sooty splotch on the underside of the frame.  It would appear to me, in my most unprofessional opinion, that it fireballed at some point in its past.  The upper part of the frame, globe and vent must have been cleaned up, but obviously the frame hadn't been taken off to clean under that.  It's kind of an archaeological dig of sorts.

I removed the generator, valve and fuel stem and the generator wasn't as badly crudded up as the first 237 or the 249.  The fuel pickup, though, was the surprise.  The lower end of the pickup tube was heavily lacquered with a thick, black coating of varnish which was also plugging up the lower end of the inside of the tube.  I soaked that in lacquer thinner and periodically worked a pipe cleaner into the tube and eventually got all of the stuff out.  The valve was stuck shut and a little work on that got it operating again.

The gasket on the fuel cap was a mess and I had a heck of time getting the screw out of it.  I'd tighten the cap down on the fount and try to remove the screw and the insert would start to spin since the gasket was in such poor condition.  It took several more tighten/unscrew/tighten some more cycles until the insert "bit" enough to hold and the screw could be backed out.  Good thing I got a bunch of gaskets a week or so ago.

The outside of the fount has been pretty much cleaned up and has an initial polish.  The inside still needs a BB dance and several rinses, but it doesn't look any worse than the other 237's fount did.  Oh, and I pulled the check valve and cleaned that up.  It was stuck and resisting external efforts to free it.  Score another use of the check valve puller tool.

More to come as work progresses on this lantern.  It is looking like it should clean up as well as the first 237.  Love all that shiny nickel!
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
DougA
The second 237 is nearing completion.  I just need to do a BB dance and reassemble it.  I am hoping maybe later in the week I may have fire in it.

We just got back from closing up the cottage for the winter and while there I went looking for something I remembered my dad having bought a long time ago, a propane mantle lantern.  He had gotten it I think when the 237s were giving a lot of trouble (needed generators cleaned, but he never did anything like that) and used it once, I think. Something about a propane leak and he never trusted it.

It's a Bernz-o-matic Porta Light (pic below) and I tried it quick on a 1-lb propane tank and it worked just fine.  Before I could get a money shot I realized the mantle was torn so I shut it down right away.  No leaks that I noticed.

So I brought this one home, too, for a little cleanup and new mantle.  I may take this one back to the cottage as it is perfect for the way we would need a lantern: very infrequently and no PM or other attention needed in the intervening time.  We have 1-lb tanks on had for a small gas grill we have.

bernz1.jpg 


DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
DougA
The second 237 is done and fired!  I had a quiet afternoon with not much else going on after work today so I had at the BB dance and reassembly of the lantern.  Everything went smoothly with that and after supper it was off to the patio to burn the mantle and to light the lantern.  Lit perfectly first try:

2372-04.jpg 

Once that was running I thought what the heck and went and brought out the other 237, the first one I fettled, and lit that one and had a mini light-up with the 237s:

2372-05.jpg 

This has to be the first time in probably more than 50 years that both of these 237s were operating at the same time.  I learned from my mom that my dad and uncle and grandfather used to light the cottage interior with the Coleman lanterns in the early days of the family's ownership of the cabin.  She said the heat was oppressive on hot summer nights!

Running both lanterns tonight I have discovered that the first 237 needs a new gasket in its fuel cap, I have to keep pumping that one back up.  No surprise as it is still the original gasket in that one and it's a wonder it holds at all.  I didn't have any gaskets on hand at the time I fettled that lantern and it appeared to hold air OK.

It was a pleasant evening and my mom wandered out with me when she saw the lanterns going.  Our next-door neighbors were out sitting around their gas fire pit and we had our own version of a "fire pit."  I ran the lanterns nearly an hour and then the skeeters descended on us and chased us and the lanterns inside.

On to the 228B ...
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Quote
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