200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Jim_l
Found out the hard way. Don't soak nickle plated parts in molasses.
At least I assume it's nickle. Could it be chrome?
   Jim


Matthew 5:16: "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." Jim-- Coleman Blues Member #014
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oddball
Thats sucks, you have some neat pictures by the way

                                    Robert

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Spitvalve
Wow! That is bizarre. I've soaked nickel plated, chromed parts, and aluminum with no adverse reaction. How long was the soak, and was there anything else in the mix with it? I've heard of it eating brass a bit but no experience with it yet. Time to haul out my old chemistry books for some chelation research.

Mike.
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Jim_l
About 4 days. I used Sorghum Molasses like for pancakes and such with water.
This is the first time I've tried using molasses. I did have the name plate in with the collar. It's steel and is still rusty. I'm hoping it'll get to where I can read the model no. that's stamped into it.
   Jim
Matthew 5:16: "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." Jim-- Coleman Blues Member #014
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Lamp_Doctor
Try using stock feed molasses .
the mix is one part molasses to 9 parts water leave rusty steel in for
2 weeks and check after that check daily will go brown if left untreated
after it is taken out of molasses .
PS. Don't put brake drums into molasses it eats the carbon content out of them
Bob .

Lamp Doctor Bob  likes the smell of burning kero inside house in BIG TILLEYS.
Its better than taking drugs and cheaper.
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Spitvalve
Feed molasses and water seems very popular in Australia, Bob. I hit a couple of really interesting Australian sites for antique tractors and woodworking machinery collectors where they mix it in batches large enough to dip whole fenders, tractor tinwork, and machinery castings.

So from what I've found in a couple of places (Wikipedia never lies!) a chelate strips out certain materials and then these are locked in a chemical chain bond that then frees the chelate to work again. Citric acid is a chelate, something I never realized. Evaporust apparently uses a chelate that only frees the iron from the rust molecule. It is too weak to attack the steel. Sulphur then locks up the rust molecule and the chelate goes to work again. Molasses has sulphur so there's that part of the equation.

A couple of places recommended letting the molasses ferment to form a weak acetic acid solution as the chelator. Perhaps sorghum mollasses creates a more aggressive acid that attacked the nickel on that collar, Jim?

I'm curious to try some feed molasses crystals now. As with the rest of the acids we all use, heat speeds the process. I never found Evaporust all that great, or quick after a couple of pieces had been cleaned in it, and at $32/gal it was just too expensive to do larger items. And so far, my fancy mollasses has been slow, but a good gentle deruster for things like mica globes, lamp shade holders, lantern bails etc.

Mike. 
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