200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
Camplight
I just read the Naval Jelly thread, and while I did post up in it, I figured that just in case my post got lost, I would open this thread on using molasses to remove rust.

I tried, and had some amazing success removing rust with molasses...and it was cheap!

I got some regular molasses at the grocery store, and mixed it with water...I think it was a 9 or 10 parts water to 1 part molasses. I let that sit for a couple days in an old rubbermaid container out in the shed till it formed a little froth as it fermented a little, and then I dropped in a 40 year old very rusted rim. I let it soak for a couple of days, and then scrubbed it with a wire brush, and hosed down the rest with water. The solution dissolved the rust right down into the pits, and I was very impressed.

You do have to let the molasses/water mixture ferment a little for it to kick in, which is why I waited a couple of days, and there is a slight odor, but really not too bad out in the shed, BUT, the mixture lasted all summer (about 5 months total), and I dunked many more 40 to 50 year old rusted truck parts in this same solution with great results.

Here is a pic of how well it removed the rust off half of this 40 year old rim.


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SteveRetherford
the citric acid mix i use is a by-product from making molases , not from lemons like most think . lots of ways to skin the cat !!!
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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Camplight
lol...if I am not mistaken, I think I read somewhere that the molasses trick was discovered by accident many many years ago, when some pirates accidentally dropped some old rusted stuff in some kind of molasses/water run off solution
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CDW
I use a molasses solution of 1 part molasses and 8 to 9 parts warm water. Used on Iron parts only. Objects to be cleaned must be submerged completely with about a 1/2 inch or more of solution above them. Any surface protruding accidentally from the solution will be etched or eaten away at the air/solution boundary  Takes about a week to 12 days to thoroughly clean, say, a Quick Lite frame. Object is checked daily & black oxides/deposits removed with a toothbrush and rinse under warm water.

This technique is not for everyone as it takes time (days). I've had very good success with it. Other folks have had disastrous results, so always do a test piece before submerging your precious lantern parts.
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StanDahl
I use molasses all the time - literally. There's a big Rubbermaid tub in the garage with a frying pan, Perfection heater parts, 523 wind screen and probably some HGP parts that have been in it for months. I don't check very often in the winter, as the cold temp slows the process down, but molasses won't attack the metal, just the rust. It's a great method for the patient ones among us.
ICCC Petty Bureaucrat #CMLXII...
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Camplight
CDW wrote:
I use a molasses solution of 1 part molasses and 8 to 9 parts warm water. Used on Iron parts only. Objects to be cleaned must be submerged completely with about a 1/2 inch or more of solution above them. Any surface protruding accidentally from the solution will be etched or eaten away at the air/solution boundary  Takes about a week to 12 days to thoroughly clean, say, a Quick Lite frame. Object is checked daily & black oxides/deposits removed with a toothbrush and rinse under warm water.

This technique is not for everyone as it takes time (days). I've had very good success with it. Other folks have had disastrous results, so always do a test piece before submerging your precious lantern parts.


Good points Chris!! I only ever tried it on old car parts, so I'll keep this in mind when I start doing some lanterns
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Camplight
StanDahl wrote:
I use molasses all the time - literally. There's a big Rubbermaid tub in the garage with a frying pan, Perfection heater parts, 523 wind screen and probably some HGP parts that have been in it for months. I don't check very often in the winter, as the cold temp slows the process down, but molasses won't attack the metal, just the rust. It's a great method for the patient ones among us.


Do you have any before and after pics?
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lamplighter44
That looks good.. The molasses mixture leaves metal shiny, and not with that black coating that gets on hands and wont let go, right?
Lamplighter44

Richard
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Mike
Ditto here on molasses use for years. I use about a 9:1 water/fancy molasses mix and heat will speed it up, but it is still slow. My understanding is that the acids in molasses are fairly weak so as they strip away the rust, the chelators in the molasses remove and sequestor the "rust" allowing the weak "acids" to continue working on the rust. I'm going to try some molasses crystals that are used for livestock feed and see if it works better. 

It seems to be a similar chemical process as Evaporust, but the chelators in Evaporust are more specific to iron so they can advertise that it won't harm other metals, rubber, paint, etc.

I would not make that same claim for water/molasses, and if I recall, JimI on here had the nickel partially stripped off an AGM(?) frame rest when it was put in molasses. I would also be wary using it around items like steel springs and winding mechanisms as I've heard of them becoming quite brittle and snapping.

It is good for mica chimney frames due to its gentleness. I do however, get the black film which is another similarity to Evaporust. It can be buffed off, however.

I did mistakenly leave a rusted bail for a 200 in my molasses solution for several months (ahem), and it really chewed into the bail leaving these tiny little craters so that sections looked like coral. Very cool!

There are some tool restorers that are using EDTA (Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), and pH 9 raised solutions with good results, and I think that might be more similar to the Evaporust formulation.

Mike. 
My best gal is a Coleman outing pal!
2 1/2 minutes to Midnight...
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Jim_l
Yup.

Matthew 5:16: "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." Jim-- Coleman Blues Member #014
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StanDahl
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Do you have any before and after pics?


Only one. I just took a look in the tub, there is a 502 heat can that had a lot of surface rust, I checked it about 6 weeks ago and the rust was gone, but the paint wasn't leaving. Now the paint is wiping off too, and the metal is as smooth as can be. I'll repaint it one of these days.



After molasses. The brown specs aren't rust, they are bits of molasses residue that I didn't wipe off because I wasn't paying enough attention as I took the photo. (They are on my hand also.)



Here's the other side, which wasn't as bad as the above side:




The 530 stove windscreen is looking great. There was something that spilled into the stove case and settled on the screen, causing some really nasty corruption. It's nearly gone, but needs more time, or a stronger molasses mix. I think that what remains is the actual chemical residue, not rust. It will have to be reblued, not painted. I have to learn how to do that.

The Wagner #8 is looking great and still smooth as can be. It's ready to season, but when I took it out a few months ago, it flash rusted fiercely and had to go back in again. There's a cheap no-name cast iron pan, but it needs more time, as does a 427 frame and a very very nasty 200A frame. The Perfection parts I took out a few months ago had the same flash rusting problem even with Jasso prep. They'll be going back in again too when there's room.
ICCC Petty Bureaucrat #CMLXII...
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Deanofid
I've used the molasses mix for quite a time.  Some old head told me about it
before I started getting to be an old head, myself.

These are before and after pics of some offcuts I had.  There were a bunch of them,
all about four inches long, and I didn't want to just throw them away. 
They had sat in a bucket behind the a shop.  I had picked them up at the shop, then
forgot about them.  They were in that bucket soaking in water for years.



This is what they looked like to start with.  They are 7/8" diameter steel.





I use the molasses at 1:4.  One part molasses and four parts distilled water.
I've found that using distilled water helps some in keeping stuff from growing in
the tank.  This much rust removal takes about 10 days at the 1:4 concentration.
I use a brand called Brer Rabbit Molasses.





I put one of these in the lathe and went to cutting until I found good steel.  That
rust was .030" thick.  I had dozens of these pieces, and didn't want to clean them
all on the lathe.  Rust is very hard on cutting tools and the lathe bed ways.
I put all those pieces in the molasses mix and just left them for 10 days.  After
washing them off with warm water, they all looked like the piece in the middle. 
Then I could chuck them up in the lathe and not have to be concerned with the
abrasive properties of rust messing up my tooling.

It works on any steel I've tried, and I've done a couple of lantern frames with it.
The thinner the rust, the less time it takes.  Sometimes less than a week.  It does
smell odd after it's had some rusty parts in the mix.  A little bit stinky, but that
could be from bacteria growing in the solution.  Just a guess.

Dean




Dean - <a href="http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/projects/projects.html>Machine Shop Projects</a>
ICCC #1220. Turd-anon #18

Merry Christmas! Merry Christmas!
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sourgasjohn
I get the feed grade by the gallon at TSC for around 10 bucks. I have never tried the distilled water yet,the mix really gets funky on top in the summer with tap or lake water but you can just scoop it up and pitch it. I've heard that at the local feed store if you bring your own container It's about 4 bucks a gal. Some farmers add it to marginal feed so the critters will eat it
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toddcline
Wow! Molasses... Who would have thought? Has anyone tried this on the inside of a fount?  Guess it's all good as long as you don't go trying to recycle it into a batch of cookies afterwards LOL...

Todd
What we're dealing with here is a complete lack of respect for the law........____ Todd Cline ICCC # 1296 Battle Creek, MI. ______

Mil.Spec. GP. # 73rd. Trans. Ft. Eustis Va. 1984-1987      NCO club: 1900-2200, usually.
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MustXcape
You may find the best value by purchasing dried molasses from a feed or farm supply store <linky> <linky> You can do a lot of derusting with 50#. I have read that most feed store molasses contains a mold inhibitor, which may reduce the stink as it ferments. It works well on parts that are more difficult to derust by electrolysis like stove cases. It occasionally goes on sale.

I notice they also offer dried beet pulp products
<linky> <linky> which may also work, as dried beet waste product is the active ingredient in Rustbeeter, although I have not tried it (the pulp, that is). It is frequently found combined with molasses.
I can stop collecting anytime. I just don't want to.... Soooo.... How much do you want for that?
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Camplight
Hey Dean, that rust was pretty thick, but at least you save the rods!

My old rims didn't look too bad when I got them, rusty by not too bad, but once the rust had melted away in the molasses mix, a couple of the rims showed some deep pitting too far gone to be used on the road safely, and are now going to be shop rims while I do a little body work not to mess up my good rims. Had I just used a grinder to take the rust off the surface, I probably would have never noticed these deep pits/weaknesses in the rims, so kind of glad I used molasses.
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Gasman64
Very interesting thread; THANK YOU to all those who have contributed to it.  This is something I'm going to try; I'm not going through lanterns and stoves too quickly in terms of FFRs, so I have no problem letting parts soak for a long time.  Plenty of farm stores and feed places around here, so maybe I can get something in bulk.
    
Steve    ICCC #1012
"1200"
 
        
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