200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Coldwaterpaddler
Some info for the M-1942 "Mountain Stove" users out there, and basically, for future reference..

I just returned from a 4-day backpacking hunting trip in the snow dumped last week in Colorado. I brought my 1945 Prentiss-Wabers M-1942 MOD stove. Before I left I made sure the stove looked "full". Full . . . . according to the instructions is 2/3rds, but how much exactly is 2/3rds? There's no indicator of 2/3rds anywhere, so I typically fill it until the fuel level touches the lowest point of the filler opening. Since the MOD version of the stove doesn't have an F/A tube (unlike the Wheel stove or 520) you don't need to worry so much about over-filling, however, you still need to have space for air to pressurize the fount. I didn't measure it before I left, but when I returned I removed 6.5 ounces. After that I added back in the amount of fuel I'd consider full-and-ready-to-go and that was 10 ounces. So, I used 3.5 ounces or maybe an ounce more. We were camped at roughly 11,400 feet and the temps at night when cooking were close to freezing and in the morning probably in the low 40s F. As you can imagine this 75 year-old Mountain Stove performed flawlessly. Also note that the MOD stove needs to be preheated which was done with fuel from the stove per instructions.

I cooked three dinners boiling 500ml (16 ounces) of water each time to cook tortellini (I also added a 3oz. can of chicken and salt and pepper to make a chicken broth to drink afterwards). Also, three breakfasts of scrambled eggs (Ova Easy Egg Crystals), and 8 ounces of water to boiling for instant coffee. This is what I consider typical backpacking food.

So, it looks like I could go twice as long with that kind of use (i.e. 6 or 7 dinners and breakfasts). My son, who also brought his M-1942 stove, refilled on the last morning as he was boiling a lot more water, and some of it from snow which he melted with the stove first, for his meals (oatmeal and pasta sides) and coffee (using a press and a lot more water).

Frankly, I was surprised at the small amount of fuel it used. I never actually made an effort to measure it for a whole trip previously.
Stovie-Steve
"Don't let the weather run your life" - Steve
The Coleman Blues - #95
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austin65uri
You've made me love my  M1942 Mod even more!  The design, materials and production of it went way beyond the usual standards at that time for military applications.  It stands alone.  How was the hunting?
Bill.
ICCC#1601
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LongueCarabine
Steve is the man when it comes to the M1942!

Brian

Mil-Spec Ops #1929

Looking for the following lanterns; 08/36; 09/29; 05/59; 05/60; 06/61; 12/65; 11/75; 11/88
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hikerduane
That's as efficient as my couple oz. stove system using DNA and I only boil under 2 cups of water.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves and lanterns, who's counting.
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Chucker
Great report, thanks! 

I'm liking my M1942's even more now. Never have had them out in winter camping so this is good to know. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Bill
It’s hard to beat white gas for BTU’s in cold weather.  Pop can alcohol stoves are super light for sure, but DNA doesn’t generate the heat that white gas does, so you need to carry almost twice as much fuel.  DNA can be very hard to light in cold weather.  Iso-butane stoves are typically light and close to the same BTU’s as white gas, but don’t work well in the cold either.
Bill Sheehy, aka Merlotrin P.M.      ICCC #1390      eBay handle: wtspe
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #24  /  Mil-Spec Ops, Bernz-o-Matic, and Sears Syndicates #58
Looking for birthday lanterns dated 4/33, 9/33 & 7/86

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Coldwaterpaddler
@austin65uri I had enough points to get a High Country Deer tag this years (takes 6-7 years). My son and I had scouted the area over the last couple of months, however that snow storm which dumped all that snow last week messed up our plans a bit. This license means I can only hunt ABOVE tree line, and there was quite a bit of snow, and . . . no animals other than some really nice Rocky Mountain Big Horn sheep. So, we spent a lot of time hiking up to the saddles and passes in the snow, and glassed for hours, there just wasn't anything there.
Stovie-Steve
"Don't let the weather run your life" - Steve
The Coleman Blues - #95
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JimL
Steve,

Thanks for the report on the M-1942.  Although I'm not likely to be out in the wilderness, I like knowing what the best options are among my stoves.   In the case of the M-1942, I think they are the coolest looking single burner stove ever, but never realized they were so efficient.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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austin65uri
@austin65uri I had enough points to get a High Country Deer tag this years (takes 6-7 years). My son and I had scouted the area over the last couple of months, however that snow storm which dumped all that snow last week messed up our plans a bit. This license means I can only hunt ABOVE tree line, and there was quite a bit of snow, and . . . no animals other than some really nice Rocky Mountain Big Horn sheep. So, we spent a lot of time hiking up to the saddles and passes in the snow, and glassed for hours, there just wasn't anything there.
 
Sounds like a great time in spite of no venison.  I'm envious.







Bill.
ICCC#1601
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H_E
This is akin to the conversation(s) at the Southwest gathering this past weekend.  Readily available fuel, efficiency is above or at the very least equivalent to other fuels, burns in all temps, no proprietary cartridge to purchase for big $$$.  I can't see how the more modern stuff is "better."
Hercel
Not just another pretty face.
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Coldwaterpaddler
@H_E I think that if you live in a multi-story apartment building storing white gas is a pain, plus people don't like the idea you can spill it and it smells a little. I know one guy who has an MSR Whisperlite and then switched to a Jet Boil stove, but he's now switched back to the MSR for the reasons you and others listed. Multiple times now, in various backpacking and car camping conditions, I've been with people who are warming up their canister stoves in their armpits while I'm already cooking with my white gas stove. I've got roughly 100 GPAs and only three run on the canisters and one of those, a Coleman Denali, can use either white gas or canister. Coleman and maybe others use an inverted canister stand to make it work at cold temps.

So, the canister stoves have their place, but I still think the white gas GPAs rule.

Concerning the M-1942 efficiency, if you examine the 520, 530, Coleman Denali, M-1950, Optimus 8R and other similar Optimus models, the SVEA 123 and MSR GPAs they all use a similar vertical vaporizer with diffuser design. I would imagine that they are all pretty efficient. I have all of these listed, but as you know, I am partial to the M-1942. It's small, compact, no hoses and pretty well built, too. 

@austin65uri anytime I can get out into the mountains with two of my 30-ish year-old sons is a good time regardless of how the hunting trip works out for me personally. In fact, the hiking was so hard to get in there (56lb pack with rifle attached) that if it weren't for them motivating me I might have given up and turned back. 😂
Stovie-Steve
"Don't let the weather run your life" - Steve
The Coleman Blues - #95
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