200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Flyboyfwa
I have tried a few different ways to clean up burner frames, especially the really crusty quicklite frames. What is your preferred method? How do you get the best results?
Andy
Mil-Spec Ops #199
Coleman Slant Saver #54
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #06
275 Appreciation Syndicate #1970
The Coleman Blues 243's #159

ICCC #1741
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Tgarner01
On regular steel frames I've been using electrolysis. On the quicklite frames I believe they had a coating on them zinc/nickel not sure. So I've never done electrolysis on them but I would vote for evapo-rust. Seems to be the best, a bit expensive also. Citric acid works good on rust as well. Just mix it stronger for rust removal. Should be plenty of suggestions coming your way.
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Chucker
Citric acid. In a 4 qt. stock pot add 2T. to 1/4 C of citric acid (depends on how bad the rust is), fill half way with hot tap water, let sit for 20 minutes and inspect. Could put on a stove burner on low to speed it up. 

Some parts will de-rust faster. Use steel wool to clean it up. Any brass parts will get almost all the burnt areas clean then turn pink. Cleans up with fine steel wool. 

I've sometimes had to add more citric on heavily rusted parts. If it takes more than an hour I'd be surprised. Sometimes rinsing in water and baking soda keeps the flash rust away.

I usually rinse in clean water, dry with paper towel, hit with a clear coat, then dry in a toaster oven eliminating the baking soda. 
Chuck
"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, Sweet to the soul and healing to the bones." Proverbs 16:24
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Pancholoco1911
Tried electrolysis in my CQ frame no luck, no conductivity. Tried evaporust super expensive and you will need to repeat the process a couple times depending on how rusty is your frame. Tried toilet bowl cleaner and with great results I liked how it worked. 
~Pancho~
Looking for B-Day lantern 9/83, 7/85

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #101
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CaptainFantastic
My method? I put them back on the lanterns. I really HATE doing burner frames. At best, these days, they get a wipe down, maybe a little 0000. I want to try electrolysis one day.
Ian - Looking for these dates 7/82, 7/92, 8/93, 9/03, 11/05, 5/17
ICCC #1480 | ICCC co-webmaster

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Banjoman
My brother does it with sand blasting only takes 2 min then paints or clear coats it with hi temp product
Darrell
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Gunhippie
Electrolysis or phosphoric acid are my go-to solutions. If it's bad enough for electrolysis, there isn't much if any plating left (BTW: Quickies were mostly nickel-plated, 220/8B through C were tin--as were some Quickies, and later were zinc. Zinc reacts strongly with acids, so test an inconspicuous spot first. If it bubbles, it's zinc plated.).

Whatever, there is still a lot of elbow grease and bloody knuckles involved to get a frame looking really good.

Pancho--What do you mean "no conductivity"? It sounds like user error to me.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Tgarner01
Timm, if you use electrolysis on a burner with some nickel, zinc, or tin left on it should you be cautious of the solution after removal of rust? Seems I have read that in the past so I've only done the ones with absolutely no plating left. I have an air o lantern frame I'd like to do but it still has a bit of what looks like nickel left as well.
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Gunhippie
What's happening with electrolysis is that you're producing atomic hydrogen at the cathode (workpiece). Atomic hydrogen (H vs H2, molecular hydrogen) is super reactive, and reduces the rust by "stealing" the oxygen from it. I don't think you need to worry much about forming hydrogen compounds of metals.

At the anode, you're producing atomic oxygen, which will react with many metals, sometimes combining with the electrolyte to form a soluble compound.

I used a stainless beer keg for a while as my container and anode. I had heard warnings about that possibly creating chromium salts, so after a full summer of use, I sent a sample of the electrolyte off to the testing lab we use for the brewery to have it tested for chromium. Test came back negative.

I've quit using the keg for electrolysis, but that was because it presented far too much surface area of anode, which was eating power supplies. I've found a plastic bucket or tub and a single piece of rebar works just fine, and doesn't overload my power supply.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Pancholoco1911
Gunhippie wrote:

Pancho--What do you mean "no conductivity"? It sounds like user error to me.


no bubbling and maybe wasn’t getting a good contact but tried several times with no luck. 
~Pancho~
Looking for B-Day lantern 9/83, 7/85

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #101
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Tgarner01
Do you find running the single anode needing to move the rusted piece around to completely clean it? I'm running 4 heavy pieces inside of a large bucket but one would be much easier/faster
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Gunhippie
It'll generally cover about half of the piece, then I rotate the piece. I did an entire Preway 3-burner stove case a couple of weeks ago and it worked fine with a single piece of #5 rebar. I got the whole thing done in about 5 hours.

Like I mentioned above, this is to make it easier on my power supply. I've burned out a half-dozen in the last few years by pushing for too much anode area in hopes of getting full coverage.

Keeping the anode a fair distance from the work also helps keep the amperage down, as does using a lower concentration for the electrolyte.

Pancho--Getting good electrical connections is key. If you're using a rusty piece of steel for an anode, try grinding down to clean metal where your electrical connection is. Also might try using a little more electrolyte in your solution.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Tgarner01
For some reason I can only get a 7 amp pull out of my setup. The charger is capable of much more I know. Maybe the baking soda? It'll climb to about 7 and stop. Idk seems to work.
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Gunhippie
If you can borrow a real ammeter, do so. I've yet to see a battery charger ammeter that was connected to reality. I judge how hard the charger is working by feeling it for how hot it gets. If it's too hot to hold your hand on top for a couple of minutes, you'll be looking for a new charger soon. I think I'm on #4 using them for electrolysis.

If your charger works for electrolysis, it's unlikely to have a current regulator. That means the charger will put out the max it can if you push it--until it gives up the ghost.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Tgarner01
Yeah I should check it with a known good meter. I've got a couple Flukes I can try on it. It's not a typical cracker box trickle charger. Very heavy built charger I need to ask my father where he came up with it. He tends to collect good junk ðŸ˜
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Bill
 The Works Toilet cleaner, full strength.
Bill Sheehy, aka Merlotrin P.M.      ICCC #1390      eBay handle: wtspe
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #24  /  Mil-Spec Ops, Bernz-o-Matic, and Sears Syndicates #58
Looking for birthday lanterns dated 4/33, 9/33 & 7/86

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MYN
I don't get Evaporust around here. Citric acid's my preferred material for this. Its mild enough not to attack steel and effective on rust. Slow but safe and sure.
Muriatic acid is about the fastest common chemical for this but would eat up the steel as well.
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Coast to Coast
The only thing I have used is Evaporust.  I have gotten great results without damaging the metal.  I also use it on rusty vents, getting nice results without damaging the porcelain.  As mentioned above,  it is expensive, but you can use it over and over.  Also, it is slow and often requires more than one treatment.  
-Bird- Milwaukee, WI.
“I don’t want another lantern, I just want the last one again”
ICCC#1776     The Coleman Blue‘s 243’s #143
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Coast to Coast
Bill wrote:
 The Works Toilet cleaner, full strength.


 How long to you leave toilet bowl cleaner on?  I like the idea of a fast cheap alternative to evaporust for certain parts, but I don’t want to leave it on too long and cause damage.
-Bird- Milwaukee, WI.
“I don’t want another lantern, I just want the last one again”
ICCC#1776     The Coleman Blue‘s 243’s #143
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ecblanks
Different gunks require different treatments.  Acid is corrosive so I save that for last.  I first dunk the frame in a lye bath to remove anything organic, or spray it with Easy-Off if I don't have a bath going.  In one case with a nasty 228D frame I had, it removed everything and left it with a shine; no rust. Acid would have been overkill and damaging. 
Then, if there is spot rust,  I will paint on some naval jelly.  If there is significant rust it gets a bath in 50:50 water:white vinegar for about 24 hours.  
Carlton
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973
ICCC Member #1892
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