200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Leviticus Tomethreus
     So I have countless frames that I have taken the rust off of, but where there was rust looks different from where the original finish is. How do you guys put a finish on the frame/collar.
My friends don’t call me “Lantern Levi” for nothin’,
if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
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BSAGuy
I just shine it up as best I can and call it a day.  I don't shoot for factory fresh restorations, just nice respectable clean-ups so that that the lantern can look it best for whatever shape I find it.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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Leviticus Tomethreus
How do I put this kindly. Screw that. There’s no way for factory fresh?
My friends don’t call me “Lantern Levi” for nothin’,
if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
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Tgarner01
BSAGuy wrote:
I just shine it up as best I can and call it a day.  I don't shoot for factory fresh restorations, just nice respectable clean-ups so that that the lantern can look it best for whatever shape I find it.

+1
If you want to look like new buy NOS parts or unfired lanterns ðŸ˜‰ðŸ‘
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Leviticus Tomethreus
That’s too expensive. I want to try to find a way to make something old look factory original. A REAL restoration. Making it look brand new.
My friends don’t call me “Lantern Levi” for nothin’,
if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
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Tgarner01
It can be done... But would not be cost effective on anything you can pick up for a Lincoln bill$
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Leviticus Tomethreus
Well dang, let’s atleast here how it’s done. I’m curious.
My friends don’t call me “Lantern Levi” for nothin’,
if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
Quote
Tgarner01
When there is rust the original plating (whatever that may be) is gone... Also there are pits.. So you would have to smooth the pits out then replate with whatever the factory used... Coleman used a couple different materials if I remember right. @Gunhippie has some good posts on plating recently. Might do some searching on here about it. You might want to do some research on electrolysis while you're at it... You may have a good show and tell project for when you get back to school!!
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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BSAGuy
[QUOTE username=Leviticus Tomethreus userid=7320473 postid=1312644101]That’s too expensive. I want to try to find a way to make something old look factory original. A REAL restoration. Making it look brand new.[/QUOTE

If you want it to look factory new, the sky's the limit on how much you want to spend, how much money you want to invest (and ultimately lose) on it, and how much time you want to devote (or pay someone else to devote) to getting it done.

Any matter or problem can be solved if you throw enough time and money at it.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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Hot Diggity
I think the secret is to start with something that's not real bad to start with.  If there is rust and no pits on a plated collar I can often bronze brush the bare spots that were rusted and get them to blend well with the zinc plated finish.  You can also swap on better parts to replace parts that are flawed.
Trouble there is that you're doing less restoring, and more recreating. 

If it looks good lit, in the dark, it's good enough for me. 
Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
Milspec Syndicate #510
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0510
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #12
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #510
Coleman Slant Saver #510
Frank Appreciation Syndicate Member #2
Tinker, Toy maker, Trash picker, Wickie, Lamp loon
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Gavercronos
You gotta to determine what the original finish was first. Some were nickeled. Some were hot dipped in tin. Some were galvanized. Some almost look aluminized like exhaust pipes. Some were flash chromed. And some were bare steel. Bringing a frame "back" to the wrong finish will not end well. Except for the bare steel, that only takes a lot of time with a buffing wheel...
WillCat

Chautauqua County, New York
Slant Saver [svg] Frank MakerNew York State Route 5 marker

Wanted: GPA dated 5/89 (Red 286?  Black Powerhouse? 508? Early Unleadeds? Canadian things? I'll settle for a propane job at this point) Vintage Sunbeam Mixmaster bowls and accessories, Ruby-cased 10in lamp shade, 7D Mag-lite
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Leviticus Tomethreus
Well then what can you do to protect the bare metal
My friends don’t call me “Lantern Levi” for nothin’,
if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
Quote
Gavercronos
I generally use linseed oil. Others use clear coat, but that's definitely not something the factory would have used.
WillCat

Chautauqua County, New York
Slant Saver [svg] Frank MakerNew York State Route 5 marker

Wanted: GPA dated 5/89 (Red 286?  Black Powerhouse? 508? Early Unleadeds? Canadian things? I'll settle for a propane job at this point) Vintage Sunbeam Mixmaster bowls and accessories, Ruby-cased 10in lamp shade, 7D Mag-lite
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Coldwaterpaddler
Re-plating anything is expensive, which is why you are getting the advice you've been getting.  Do a little research on at-home tin plating just to get an idea of what's involved.

If you clean the metal really well, you might look into the VHT spray-on surface sealers, though I don't know if  they work on bare metal. I've never re-finished the frame, though I've thought about powder-coating them silver. No matter how you approach it, it won't be inexpensive.

As @BSAGuy said and is a joke where I work too, especially when a manager stops by and asks, "Can you get this done by this date?", to which we reply, "Well, we can do anything with enough time and money and since that's not a lot of time, we're gonna need a lot money." It holds true more often that you'd initially think.
Stovie-Steve
"Don't let the weather run your life" - Steve
The Coleman Blues - #95
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Leviticus Tomethreus
Well I’ve Jerry rigged a home nickel setup that I’ve been scared to use. My grandpa painted really the majority of his lanterns (Well, the frame and everything inside it) silver. It’s a really rough texture, I actually think it fits the lanterns really well though. However they have been a massive sob to take apart because my Grandpa basically just took the vent and glass out and taped up the fount and globe. He painted with the burner and generator and with the older ones, the tip cleaner assembly too. That was probably 30+ years ago, and they still look great other than some minor rust.
My friends don’t call me “Lantern Levi” for nothin’,
if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
Quote
Chucker
If you just want to keep the rust away and protect the frame from the ravages of time - spray them with VHT Flame Proof Clear coat (as opposed to grandpa's silver paint) and follow the curing directions carefully. 

You can then see the patina of the old steel and still have a bit of protection for years to come. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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MYN
The area where you've removed the rust will always be different from the original steel and finish. Part of the steel is gone as rust.
The frame was made from pressed sheet steel and not that thick. So you can't just replace the lost metal by means of welding and grinding it back to size.
You can still build up the metal by soldering or brazing, then size it down back to shape and coat it with whatever finish(paint, galvanized, plating or tin coat) it used to have originally. But that's quite a lot of work and can be costly.
An easier alternative would be to build it up with some heat resistant filler or paint primer and then paint it over. If the job is neat, it won't look much different from factory finish. 
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Dmacp
I would contact  Murff. He might have a few tips or even a vendor. 
Dan
ICCC member #604
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Leviticus Tomethreus
A vendor? And our lord...   MURFF.
My friends don’t call me “Lantern Levi” for nothin’,
if they did call me that.

Looking for bday lanterns 8/38, 8/41, 
10/25, and 8/07

The biggest lie I tell myself is
”I don’t need to write that down, I’ll remember it.”
Quote
Murff
Neither option is cheap but you can have the earlies done in gray Cerakote and the newer ones done in Chromex.

The coatings are thin and the pitting and rust patches will still show will show but the whole frame will be the same color, at least. 

Talking about 200A frames here.

Murff

Name: Murff   ICCC Member #726 
Coleman Blue's 243's #002   Ebay Handle: Happy-campers2 
EX-ICCC Newsletter Editor & Full time Coleman Addiction Enabler
Part-time Idito and Hater of Turd 275s
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Phredd
For for frames on lanterns that I just want to protect from future rust (which occurs fast here in humid NC) I use VHT flat aluminum (i think this is better than the flat silver). Note that this is not a restore to original - but something that will make the frame last for another decade or more.  First i get rid of all the rust I can using a wire wheel and/or dremel. If there is a lot of rust i use EvapoRust overnight. Then I do an acid bath cleaning (20% muriatic acid, 80% water). Rinse in clean water. Clean quickly with denatured alcohol. Then paint according to instructions.  And it is important to cure the paint. I let the paint dry for an hour them bake at 250 for 30 min, cool down, then 450 for 30 min, then cool down. Then install it on the lantern. And when you first light it - let it run for 15-20 min then shut it off. Let it cool.  It's then ready for the next 10-20 years.

Phredd
ICCC#1799
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #40
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