200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

itsawonderfullfe
Hi. I want to get back into camping and knew I had an old Coleman stove in the garage. Turns out it's a 425. Surprise! It's got the round tank. It's in very good shape but needs a bit of touch up. What should I use to restore the external part of the tank? I also have a 321B lantern and case but it's in great shape. Thank you.
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Newfie
What colour is the tank?

How bad is the paint on it? I tend to leave them as is. The battle scars are usually well earned. If you intend to use it you'll end up with more.

Don't light the 321B until you change the o-rings to new viton or fluorosilicone ones. The o-rings break down over time and can cause a flame-up. The o-ring behind the valve wheel is the one that will fail first. When it does you'll see a flare-up around the valve wheel. 
Shane Looking for the following Canadian birthday lanterns or lamps: 2-32, 6-34,
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itsawonderfullfe
Coleman 425.jpg 
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itsawonderfullfe
It's dirty and needs a bit of clean up but the fuel tank is brown paint and in good shape, except some of the paint is gone so there are a few silver spots. Thanks for the info about the lantern o-rings. This is new to me. What does the colour of the tank signify? I saw some photos of 425s that had a different colour tank.
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Majicwrench
All of those need a new cap gasket, any pressure loss is bad. And oil the pump leather, and it will probably work like new.
Cap gasket from Old Coleman Parts (click on logo on top of page) or an oring works too.
Keith
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itsawonderfullfe
I took the pump apart after watching a video. The pump 'leather' appears to be rubber and in good shape. If I was to oil it, what type of oil should I use? Thanks. This is all new to me but I love the old stuff.
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1hpycmpr
Nice!  That’s the early 425NL with brown tank and external leg brackets.  Not near the Book but I’m thinking 1948-ish.  Do you know the history behind the stove and lantern?
Mark
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Gasman64
[welcome]from Pennsylvania!
Steve
ICCC #1012
logoballistol logo 1a.png

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Majicwrench
If it has a rubber pump cup it has been replaced, which is fine. The rubber ones don't need to be oiled as do the leather ones, but I still oil em a bit with whatever you have, motor oil, 3-1, WD40, anything.
  Leather is a better material for pump cups, it lasts longer and works much better in the cold.
Keith
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itsawonderfullfe
Yes. Both were my Dad's who liked to hunt and fish. They're in good shape but dirty with minor rust spots on the stove case only. He passed away in 1980. I'm not sure the lantern has been used. My husband's idea of roughing it was a 3 star hotel. He passed away a few years ago so I am just starting to get back into camping. Some of my friends are expressing concerns about the stove given it's age. Unless it leaks, anything I should be concerned about? I watched a few videos on how to maintain it so I think I know the basics of how it should work. The tank was empty but I haven't checked for internal rust yet.

Carol
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itsawonderfullfe
Thanks for the welcome Steve.
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itsawonderfullfe
Thanks Keith. I have WD-40. Can I use water to check if it leaks? Or would that be a bad idea?

Carol
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Bumpkin 95
No need to put water in the tank if it is clean inside. Best is to pump it up with and hold the tank under water like the bath tub or a bucket full. If you see air bubbles that indicates a leak. Cap gaskets or Leakey valves can be replaced. Holes in the tank mean you will probably need a new tank. But even those can found.  And welcome from Virginia 
  • Lee
  • Milspec Syndicate member #1995
  • Like a lantern just hanging out
  • ICCC member #1927
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Majicwrench

Like said above, don't put water in it. I don't like submerging tanks, water will get it the pump part, then water gets in the tank, then you have rust.
  A spray bottle with soapy water works wonders for finding pressure leaks.

With tank empty, pump 40-50 pumps, now piss some soapy water around fill cap and look for bubbles.  If yoiu have a new style rubber pump cap you might have a newer fill cap too, maybe one with a good seal. But piss on it and find out.

Now when you remove cap there should be air pressure released. Is there?

  These stoves, even at this age,  are as safe as anything that burns a flamable material. Due care is required.

Keith
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TwoCanoes
Once you check over your stove and get it cleaned up and running, you'll be able to assure your friends that it cooks every bit as well as a brand new one.  Can't wait to see a picture of it in use.  Welcome to the Forum.
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itsawonderfullfe
Thanks so much for the good advice. I will let you know how it goes. I see from another post that the brown tank is one of the earlier models. How cool is that? Feeling like I won a small lottery.

Carol
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Bumpkin 95
Yes you did kinda. It’s what we call a 425 no letter.  The no letter reference is it is the first  version of 425 made . Produced fro 1948 to 1953. The dark brown tank  and external leg locks on yours is the earliest version of that so you have 70+ your old stove. And with only a little work will run like new. Can’t wait to see pictures when you get it running 🙂
  • Lee
  • Milspec Syndicate member #1995
  • Like a lantern just hanging out
  • ICCC member #1927
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Majicwrench
Both of my 425NLs have gold tanks, and so did one I sold a couple years ago.
Keith
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1hpycmpr
Very nice that you have some of your Dad’s camping equipment, Carol.  Like Keith, my 425NL also has the later bronze tank.  Once you get it fixed up and running good, have your friends over and cook up something to reassure them that your Dad’s 72 year old stove works just fine!
Mark
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itsawonderfullfe
Can't fire it up yet. It appears to hold air and the pump area and fuel cap area don't show any leaks but the generator valve, where the knob stem meets the assembly, is blowing bubbles. Shucks. A bit of work and maybe some parts but I don't think it will be ready for this weekend.

Thanks to everyone for your help. I will post photos when it's in an improved and hopefully working state.

Carol
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Bumpkin 95
If I understand you correctly That sounds like the packing nut leaking try to tighten it about 1/4 turn and retest. You can tighten it until the valve wheel gets hard to turn. At that point if it hasn’t stopped you will need a new packing. But tightening has always worked for me so far.
  • Lee
  • Milspec Syndicate member #1995
  • Like a lantern just hanging out
  • ICCC member #1927
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itsawonderfullfe
Sir, you are a genius. It is now bubble free - no leaks. Thank you so much!

Carol
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Majicwrench
We are waiting for the flame shot...... 🙂

Lever up for at least 30 seconds. 
Keith
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1hpycmpr
Nice to hear the leak is no more!  Good call, Lee.  Hopefully you get to use it this weekend, Carol.
Mark
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Bumpkin 95
Glad that was it. And we hope you can enjoy it soon. It is really Is quit satisfying every  time you bring one back to life🙂
  • Lee
  • Milspec Syndicate member #1995
  • Like a lantern just hanging out
  • ICCC member #1927
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