200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
BPCam
I took my 210H camping with me. It worked fine at home. But, the first night out it flamed up and then started.  The next day it started fine.  But, when I went to light it that night, this is what happened:



Anyone have any ideas what is going on, and what I might be able to do to correct this?

Thanks.
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Gand28
Fuel leak somewhere. Perhaps generator jamb nut. Or did you open the valve and then search for a match?
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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BPCam
There was fuel leaking from one of the mantles.  Did I overpump?
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Gand28
Raw fuel should never drip from the mantles.  Over pumping is not an issue but you must have had the valve open a bit while you pumped it up. If the valve is not sealing correctly then it will continue to run after you turn it off. Since you didn’t mention that, I’ll assume the valve was open?

Did you run it out of fuel the night before and forget to close the valve?
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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Gunhippie
I've forgotten to make sure the valve was closed before pumping the lantern up, with the same results you show. Usually this happens after running the lantern dry then re-filling. It's now part of my checklist to:

1) Check the valve is closed before filling.

2) Check that the valve is closed before pumping.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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GCinSC
Any possibility that orifice was not secure on end of gen tube? Allowed big raw fuel leak. 

Pure speculation on my part in addition to other posted ideas. 
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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BPCam
I'll go try it again with the valve firmly closed this time.  Also, as I am new to all this, could someone explain what is meant by an orifice not being secure on the end of the gen tube?
Thanks.
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Gand28
BPCam wrote:
I'll go try it again with the valve firmly closed this time.  Also, as I am new to all this, could someone explain what is meant by an orifice not being secure on the end of the gen tube?

he means the jamb nut at the bottom of the generator 
Thanks.
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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austin65uri
I think he's referring to the removable generator tip that has the fuel orifice?
Bill.
ICCC#1601
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GCinSC
austin65uri wrote:
I think he's referring to the removable generator tip that has the fuel orifice?


Yes the tip of the gen. It’s a very long shot but worth checking to prevent another video like that. 

But check all possible fuel leak sources too. 
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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zoomkat
If the lantern ran ok previously, then there is probably no issue with the generator. Most likely the fuel control valve was open too long (or opened several times) prior to the lighting attempt. Note that if the generator spews out raw gas, a lot is probably going to go back down the air inlet tube and out under the collar.
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JimL
The fact that the lantern finally settled down and began burning bright is not a symptom of a loose generator tip.  This looks like a choice between having the valve open while pumping or opening the valve and then go looking for a match, allowing the fuel to continue flowing.

-Jim

Have you ever imagined a world with no hypothetical situations?
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hahoe03
Without being ugly, looks like user error. Lantern was flooded and had to burn off the excess fuel, then burned as intended. Been there, done that.
Jeremiah 29:11-13 KJV For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord , thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end. [12] Then shall ye call upon me, and ye shall go and pray unto me, and I will hearken unto you. [13] And ye shall seek me, and find me , when ye shall search for me with all your heart.

Mike Trigg
The Coleman Blue's 243's #053. Sears Collectors Club #69 (pending)
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austin65uri
A lesson and reminder for us all.  Thankfully it wasn't in a tent.  Hard to imagine a 501 out of control could be any worse. Try reaching into that inferno and shutting off the valve.
Bill.
ICCC#1601
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GCinSC
JimL wrote:
The fact that the lantern finally settled down and began burning bright is not a symptom of a loose generator tip.  This looks like a choice between having the valve open while pumping or opening the valve and then go looking for a match, allowing the fuel to continue flowing.


Jim,

Guess I gotta read ALL the post first, I relied too much on the video to tell the whole story.

Gary 
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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Chucker
Most of us have had something similar happen. That's why its a good idea to 1) test them outside and 2) have a fire extinguisher nearby. 

I fired a couple lanterns up on our dining room table the other night and flames rose above the vent - got some evil death rays from my wife - I took them outside, ha. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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scl
fuel valve slightly open while pumping, not very noticeable until lightup. fuel will weep down side of generator and collect in frame and in collar, then when an ignition source is introduced, fireball. this is why i now light everything outdoors but i do sometimes light in the garage which i know is a bad idea too.
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MYN
Hi Bruce,
I'm neither familiar nor aware of the Coleman 210H. Is that an instant or quick lighting, CF-fueled unit?
BPCam wrote:
There was fuel leaking from one of the mantles.  Did I overpump?

When did you notice that? Was it just before lighting it with a match or just after pumping it up? Or immediately after opening the valve? Or did you remember even opening the valve at all before the inferno? 
Maybe the plunger in the F/A was stuck and the valve simply did not seat in the first place, to shut off the fuel while you were pumping the lantern earlier.
Of course, the lantern would finally settle down after all that 'preheat' by the inferno...
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JimL
Several comments here are based on experience.   I'll admit to three lantern infernos.  The first was a 200A.  I knew I should have checked the air tube for instructions, but being new at this, I was perhaps a bit cocky.  Well, there was a dirt dauber nest in the air tube, above where the generator enters.  Fuel just poured straight back down the generator.  The second time, I had let the lantern run dry and failed to close the valve before going to light it again.  I realized it when I smelled gasoline during pumping (this was one of my RUG lanterns).  Like the first, this was at night and I didn't see how much fuel was pouring out before I went to light it.  That was quite the fireball with fuel all in the cage and all over the fount.  The third time was the scariest.  I was opening the valve all the way when I heard a 'click'.  I did't think anything of it.  What happened was the valve nut broke free and fuel came pouring out of the valve and ignited.   There was so much flaming that I didn't want to take the time to run inside and get a fire extinguisher.  I kept reaching through the flame to close the valve a little at a time.  The amazing thing is that by reaching in for that split second at a time, I didn't even get a burn.  Probably the best advice I can give on a flame up is to say don't panic!  Take a second to evaluate and then take action.  Coleman wasn't cheap when it came to founts, and the metal isn't super thin.  You can evaluate before taking acton.

-Jim

Have you ever imagined a world with no hypothetical situations?
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Gunhippie
The last time I saw a lantern blazing like that was as my father ran across the campground with it hanging by the bail to hurl it into the bay. That was the last time we used a Coleman lantern while camping. Mom forbade them.

If I only knew then what I know now....

One of the best safety devices to have to occasions like this is a 5-gal plastic bucket. Place the flaming lantern on the ground (mineral soil, please) or solid surface and put the bucket upside-down over it. The flames will smother almost instantly, long before the bucket begins to melt.

Much less mess and expense than using a fire-X.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Phredd
The bucket is a great idea! I’ve never had a flamer but this thread gives a bunch of choices if it happens. 1. Try to tun off the valve. 2. Put a bucket on it. 3. heave it into a nearby lake.😀😀
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arizonacamper
I keep a metal 5 gallon bucket when I go camping for trash. I never thought of doing something like that. that's a good idea!
SHAWN
Gas is what you use for washing parts diesel is for making power!
Looking for any lantern date of 5/63
Have you ever stopped to think and forget to start again!!
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Gunhippie
Phredd wrote:
The bucket is a great idea! I’ve never had a flamer but this thread gives a bunch of choices if it happens. 1. Try to tun off the valve. 2. Put a bucket on it. 3. heave it into a nearby lake.😀😀


I think #3 might get you in some trouble these days! But the pool of flaming gasoline floating on the surface of the bay was very cool.

I've used the bucket trick exactly once, for a Svea 123 that started leaking (badly) from the safety relief valve while it was running. Fortunately, the stove was sitting on a thick steel plate on my workbench, so no harm done. Just be sure the bucket is empty--water will spread a gas fire.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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gpaguy
Whenever I light any Coleman fuel burning lantern I like to have my long stem lighter already burning under the mantle before I crack open that fuel valve.  If something doesn't seem right I'll close the valve, keep the lighter burning to see if it lights or wants to catch on fire then crack the fuel valve open again. This way there's not going to be an issue with flooding the lantern.


John
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MikeKY
I’ve had some good flame-ups that have been operator error but never a part failure. 
I do keep a metal metal garbage can and a fire extinguisher by my side in the garage.  DDB3F032-5A98-4948-A510-59F99FC4E86F.jpeg 
I don’t make a habit of checking them on a regular basis but thanks to this post I will now. 
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austin65uri
In addition to a bucket and fire extinguisher, I keep an old heavy bath/beach towel handy.  I'll even wet it down if I'm fettling, or messing with a GPA I'm not sure about.  It's a very quick way to smother the flames without too much trouble.
Bill.
ICCC#1601
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Chucker
Some of our campgrounds request you use a 5 gal. bucket of water near your campfire. Pretty sure dropping a flaming GPA in that would work just fine except for a bit of water in a pump tube. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Gunhippie
Chucker wrote:
Some of our campgrounds request you use a 5 gal. bucket of water near your campfire. Pretty sure dropping a flaming GPA in that would work just fine except for a bit of water in a pump tube. 


No. Just no. Hot, flaming gasoline (CF) and water just makes things much worse. This is where it goes from an amusing story to an emergency room visit--and maybe some time in a burn clinic. Unless, of course, it's a LOT of water, like a bay of the Pacific Ocean.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Chucker
Roger that. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
Quote
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