200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
hikerduane

Looked for this topic, could not filter it to get any info.  What if any fire extinguisher do you keep handy?  Arm and Hammer suffice or a real extinguisher?  Found out yesterday, extinguishers are stamped on the bottom and are only good for 10 years, being serviced in-between.
Duane

Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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gearythefordman

danduman would be the go to guy on this subject. It's how he makes his living!

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0038, Sears&Thermos Lantern Aficionado &
Quite comfortable in my own insanity! ICCC member #1578

Geary W. Ward
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dwillie
There's not to many nastier feelings, than when you pull the pin, and it doesnt work. I been there.
Darien.
“All of us are creatures of a day; the rememberer and the remembered alike.”    

Coleman Blues #67.   ICCC #1242.   Searching for 5-1940. 6-36.
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wayne
If you buy one make sure it is rated ABC&D to cover all the bases.
Wayne
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mtnrider29
I keep a Kidde Full Home extinguisher handy in every room with a gas line. That means the kitchen, the laundry room, and basement for the furnace and water heater.  I also keep Kidde Garage/Workshop units the the garage/ workshop, one in the tool shed for if we ever have a back yard fire that goes wrong and one in post barn.  
   Why so many, because i learned a lesson from a car fire i had once.  We used to only keep one in the kitchen.  One day in 2003 after i drove home from work in my 87 Chrysler we noticed smoke coming out from under the hood.  of course i opened it to see what was going on - bad move.  What was a small mostly smothered fire shot up several feet in the air.  The only extinguisher we had was under the kitchen sink, the garden hose was reeled up in the back yard.  It was faster to get to the fire extinguisher first and tell my wife to grab the hose.  If i had a fire extinguisher in the garage I might have been able to save the car.  I did get to it in time to keep the fire contained to a the engine area but everything that was plastic was gone.  I ended up selling it for scrap.  When i replaced that spent unit i made sure to pick a larger replacement.  I also got a small break on my home owners ins for having the fire extinguisher, emergency fire ladders for upstairs and my smoke and co detectors.
Nick " Sixty percent of the time it works everytime."
ICCC Memeber 1443
MilSpecOps: 052
28 lanterns and 7oops 9 stoves…. maybe i need to work on my ratio

 

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Mike
I have a 10lb ABC (D is for magnesium, sodium, phosphorus, and other elements that react violently--don't touch those so I don't do D) extinguisher and every month I turn it upside down and shake it for awhile so the chemical doesn't compact.

What's a fire extinguisher cost? $50? Every 10 years? Cheap insurance to replace. Refilling and hydrostatic testing will be that much anyways.

Mike.
My best gal is a Coleman outing pal!
2 1/2 minutes to Midnight...
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Chucker
Agreed; I keep one in the bedroom, kitchen, dryer/furnace room, and work shop.

We also have them in our Jeeps as I had a vehicle fire once and won't go through that again. Thankfully I was able to put that fire out by throwing dirt on it.
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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hikerduane
I was looking at a 3lb. one yesterday, $19, but the date on the bottom was 12, so if going along with the good for 10 years, already lost 2.  I'll look some more, only hit one big box store, feed store and a loca,l small town hardware store who said it did not pay to keep a license to sell them.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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mtnrider29
I just checked the Kidde site for their replacement guidelines.  Here is what they say about their brand.

Step 2 - Place Fire Extinguishers- within reach of every level of your home!

  • Install close to exits, and in the kitchen and garage. Include all locations where a fire may start.
  • Check the gauge monthly to be sure it is pressurized.
  • Replace fire extinguishers that are over 12 years old or after use.

sorry  for the small grey print,  you can see it your self from the link below.
http://www.kidde.com/SafetyMadeSimple/Pages/HowtoProtectYourFamilyFromHomeFires.aspx#.UyiKwmIRCSo
Nick " Sixty percent of the time it works everytime."
ICCC Memeber 1443
MilSpecOps: 052
28 lanterns and 7oops 9 stoves…. maybe i need to work on my ratio

 

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hammer_off
In addition to the fire extinguisher, I keep a metal trash can with metal cover on my screen porch where I run my GPSs.  If you can quickly smother the fire, it beats cleaning up the powder from an ABC extinguisher.  However, cleaning up powder beats cleaning up ashes.
Steve

If men could learn from history, what lessons it might teach us! But passion and party blind our eyes, and the light which experience gives is a lantern on the stern, which shines only on the waves behind us!
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Great Lakes Coleman Collector
ICCC# 914
Wokakije wan bluha
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NickelFount
Here's mine.....

pyrene.jpg 


....but right below it, I also have this ...Just in case!...

20140318_154134.jpg 
Ken
__________________________

There's always room for another one.
eBay handle :  k.e.n.
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hikerduane
I'll have to shop more, maybe ask at a building supply warehouse.  I have a gallon covered can, down sizing to a quart for matches, trash.  Try not to burn debris in it while playing.
Was down in Modesto last week, less than 20 hours.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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HillCountry
I have a ten pound ABC fire extinguisher in the garage where I work on lanterns, but a little away from the workbench. I keep a windex bottle of soapy water handy that would be useful if I ever had a problem. So far, I've been careful and have never had to put out any fires in the garage.
Tim - ICCC Member #1217
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REJ2
The fire extinguisher service we use comes around once or twice a year. They set aside the outdated ones, replace with new ones. The ones that are serviceable get a few solid whacks on the bottom with a hard rubber mallet, that's the service. Like most of you I keep a few in the likely places, they get the mallet whack every so often.
Bob    
Never, ever, leave behind a $5 lamp
MilSpecOps Syndicate #016
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0131
Coleman Blues 243 #86
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #047
ICCC #1574
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MustXcape
I don't think baking soda, sand, or a hose are sufficient or appropriate for a gasoline fire, especially in a GPA device. I keep an assortment of ABC fire extinguisher in every level of the house, outbuildings, and vehicles. They are mostly relatively inexpensive mass merchandized models that go on sale every fire protection month/week in October. I have done this since early on in life and it paid off when I had a moving vehicle fire. I also picked up several large racetrack used CO2 extinguishers, which I prize because they leave no mess. But they are pricey new.

Not that any are mount and forget about till you need them. The pressure gauges are primitive. Whether gas or chemical powder extinguishers the propellant can slowly leak out past the simple valve they utilize. It is exacerbated if the extinguisher has been used. The chemical or particulate matter can lodge in the valve seat and the propellant can slowly leak out. The gauge needle can (rarely) stick and not indicate this. Solid chemical extinguishers must be flipped and shaken on a regular basis to prevent the chemical from caking. The gauge will not indicate this. I have many retired extinguishers where the only thing wrong with them is caked or non freely moving dry chemical (or any extinguisher I have lost confidence in). Still, I won't throw them away. I put a new one next to it and use the old one as a backup.

For all the common extinguishers, it is cheaper to replace them than to have them serviced. It is better to get a higher quality dry chemical or CO2 extinguisher, but I have found then cost prohibitive. I did get some good deals from a guy who serviced extinguishers. The ones I got where rotated out of service from the large manufacturing plants he contracted with, so he serviced and sold them on the side.

I follow the advice posted on the CCF, testing my rebuilds outdoors with a large steel trashcan with lid nearby, and sand at it's base to provide a softer landing if needed. Many a globe has been lost when a flaming lantern was tossed out the door. Don't test your lanterns with a globe on, no matter how confident you are of your work!
I can stop collecting anytime. I just don't want to.... Soooo.... How much do you want for that?
[75x48200a1][75x4840][75x4810][75x4820][75x4860][75x4890][75x4830]
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magikbus
Yup, that's what I was taught many years ago.  Corporal punishment in the form of a few solid whacks with a rubber mallet keeps the powder from caking up in the tank.
Stan
I always take the road less traveled, now where the h3ll am I?
Vancouver Island Branch ccf #0
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hikerduane
Clearing out my mom's garage yesterday, finally noticed a large fire extinquisher.  I'll check it out and see if I can get it serviced and take it to my place.   Thank you all for your information.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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mtnrider29
Ha Ha who would have guessed that a bunch of guys that play with fuel and fire are also fairly fire safety conscious.
Nick " Sixty percent of the time it works everytime."
ICCC Memeber 1443
MilSpecOps: 052
28 lanterns and 7oops 9 stoves…. maybe i need to work on my ratio

 

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danduhman
I have serviced extinguishers that came off of a ww2 liberty ship and were dated 1942 ,they do not wear out .They need to be serviced annually which is a visual check of the gauge to make sure it is in the proper operating range ,and have the powder fluffed up by either inverting the extinguisher and gently tapping on the side with the palm of your hand until you feel the clumped up powder drop or gently tap the extinguisher on the bottom with a dead blow hammer until you feel the powder liquefy ( the extinguisher will start to bounce or vibrate when you strike it instead of just a thud .  Be careful not to damage the shell by pounding to hard .If the shell of the extinguisher is not rusty or damaged in some way it is good .NFPA rules state that a stored pressure extinguisher must be emptied out and internally inspected and refilled every 6 years from the date of manufacture ( date can be found on the label or stamped on the bottom or the bottom rim this is what is known as (6 yr. maintenance). Every 12 years  the extinguisher must be emptied out and filled with water and then subjected to a pressure  2-3 times the normal operating pressure ( this is known as hydro testing). I have not heard of an extinguisher having a 10 year expiration date . Co2 and foam and water extinguishers all have different maintenance requirements. ABC dry chemical extinguishers are the best for home use ,the ideal extinguisher for putting out a lantern fire would be a Co2 as it is not as messy as a dry chemical extinguisher  but it is more  expensive and cost more to maintain. A 5 lb. ABC dry chemical should be adequate for most lantern fires  . A=wood ,paper, water extinguisher= dry powder ,combustible liquid C= Co2 ,electrical fires K= kitchen fires D=metal fires ,aluminum, magnesium Etc. I hope this answers any questions you have.
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hikerduane
Very helpful info Danny, among the other replies also of course.  I'll check out the fire extinquisher tonight, my dad passed on about 21 years ago, so I'm sure my mother never did anything.  At least now, if it is in good shape, I'll only have to pay for a service and not the whole thing.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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danduhman
You don't need to do anything except fluff up the powder ,and check the gauge for pressure if you are using it at home for personal use that's all that's required . the only time it needs 6 yr., maint or a hydro is if you are using it commercially.
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Junkboy999
Good info.  to know. 

I have a 3 lbs one on the floor in the kitchen next to the fridge and a 5 or 10 (not sure) in the garage / woodshop. I need to get one for my RC flight and charging station now that I using more and more Lipo batteries.


Word for the wise, A lipo battery bruns from the inside out and agent from a fire extinguisher will not enter the burning battery to stop it from burning until the two chemicals in the battery are done reacting. Best way to handle a Lipo fire is to place the battery in a container with holes in it to let the pressure and gas out safely but stop the flames from setting any thing around it on fire.  Back away and let it burn out.  try not to breath the gas.  
Terry Aka Junkboy999
ICCC#1327, 275 ASM #0999 Coleman BLue #999
Looking for Coleman 2 burner stove or tank dated 5-64.
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Birdman
I'm glad I read this! I keep 6 fire extinguishers throughout the house. I just "serviced" them all with my dead fall hammer. Half of them took several taps before I could hear the powder loosen up. The others seemed loose without a need for a tap, but got a few anyway. I had no idea this was needed to keep them usable.

Thanks to all for this valuable information.

I love this site!

Tom
Tom
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #400
The Coleman Blue's 243's #103      
"A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way"
Mark Twain
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Kmot
I'm very thankful for this thread being started, and all the xlnt info posted. I have a couple of dry extinguishers I bought when I moved into my house and they have not been touched since! That's 18 years now. 

I also have a 'tiny' CO2 extinguisher that I bought in 1974. Down the street from where I lived was an extinguisher servicing company and I got mine from there, it was already an antique when I bought it. The label looks very cool. But I used it one time, decades ago, and have never known where to get it re-filled. [frown]

I am going to try the dead blow hammer on my 'newer' ( lol...) ones,  but after reading this thread I have decided I better buy some new ones, and more than just a couple! Oh, and a metal trashcan and lid too!
~Tom~

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0017

ICCC #1274
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Kmot
I placed an order for three new ABC extinguishers and went to pick them up today at Walmart. 2 were 'full house' and one was 'garage and workshop'. When I got them home, the garage one I discovered had been tampered with. The flap on the carton was torn, and inside the box the extinguisher was covered in dry chemical and the gauge was half way down. And powder started leaking out the bottom of the box. Back it goes to Wally World. [rolleyes]

Anyway, I checked my old extinguisher and turns out it was mfg'd in 1994. I could not feel anything loose inside when I shook it. For that matter, neither could I feel anything loose in the new one, mfg'd in 2014. [confused]

I am going to smack the old one on the bottom with a dead blow. Should I smack the new ones as well?


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~Tom~

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0017

ICCC #1274
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danduhman
Tom, the two extinguishers you show in your picture are a 5lb abc all purpose and a 2 1/2 lb  abc all purpose I would use the 5lb in the shop it is designed for a larger fire and I would keep one of the smaller ones in the kitchen ,I keep one in the cabinet next to the stove, the other 2 1/2 lb should go next to any gas appliance or fire place or clothes dryer . Both of the ones you show look to be ok as far as the gauges indicate a full charge. They need to have the powder agitated at least once a year because when they sit for long periods the powder inside settles and cakes up and becomes hard and when you go to use it clumps of powder will clog the pick up tube and it will not operate. When you agitate it by turning it upside down and tapping it with a dead blow hammer you loosen up the caked up powder and you will feel a slight jolt and a shift in weight as it drops, if you continue to tap it you will feel the change when the powder has dropped it goes from a dull thud to a hollow sound and as you strike it, it will sort of take on a bounce this an indication that the powder is agitated . Having done this with the head off of one when I am servicing it you can see the change it becomes like a liquid instead of a powder when you hit the side of the extinguisher it makes waves and you can see bubbles coming up to the surface as the air is settling out of it. That's when it is sufficiently agitated .While im at it I am contracted occasionally to conduct extinguisher training classes for some of my customers and we use an acronym when doing the training it is P.A.S.S. which stands for Pull,(the pin) Aim,(the nozzle) Squeeze (the handle) & Sweep (the spray pattern at the base of the flame).
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myles860
Mike wrote:
I have a 10lb ABC (D is for magnesium, sodium, phosphorus, and other elements that react violently--don't touch those so I don't do D) extinguisher and every month I turn it upside down and shake it for awhile so the chemical doesn't compact.

What's a fire extinguisher cost? $50? Every 10 years? Cheap insurance to replace. Refilling and hydrostatic testing will be that much anyways.

Mike.


Magnesium is found in laptop frames. So if your laptop catches fire you might want one.
Expendable
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Kmot
Danny, thanks for the info! The small one on the right is the old one, mfg'd in 1994. But if I can agitate the powder in it I will put it in my truck. The big one is one of my two new "all house" extinguishers I just bought. I was going to use the plastic mount and attach it to a wall in the kitchen. The other 5-pounder I was thinking of putting in the laundry room with the gas clothes dryer. When I get another 'garage and shop' from Walmart it will of course go into the garage. I have one more in my shop, that was bought in 2005. I need to go whack that one a couple of times!
~Tom~

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0017

ICCC #1274
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GabbyJohnson_1876
I'd like to thank OP Duane for posting this.
I'm often critical of clueless people, but it turns out I've been completely clueless about fire defense for far too long. Prompted by this topic, I checked out my extinguishers -- two in the kitchen, one in the workshop and one in the car. They're all more than 10 years old and have never been touched. (And I thought I was well-covered in the event of a fire!) The one in the workshop has a 1995 inspection tag.
I tried "bumping" all the extinguishers, but I suspect their contents are all a solid mass at the bottom of the bottle and useless, so I'll either have them serviced professionally or just replace them.
Also, the amount of Arm & Hammer left in the box in my kitchen might not be enough to put out a match, so I'll have to make a major investment here. I do have a handy pizza pan to snuff out a skillet fire, however.
As for Coleman stuff, I never light them inside, so that's a plus...
JAYoung ... in beautiful Butte, Montana
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magikbus
I bought a couple of new ones the other day and took the deadblow hammer to them to try and feel the difference between them and my old ones.  The difference is pronounced!  AFter I thumped my old ones for around 3 or 4 minutes, they too became just like the new ones.  I can even hear the difference when they are properly agitated while thumping them.

Stan
I always take the road less traveled, now where the h3ll am I?
Vancouver Island Branch ccf #0
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danduhman
I am glad I was able to help shed a little light on the fire extinguisher issue ,after this thread has run its course I might suggest to the moderators to consider moving it to the archive for technical help .Life Safety is an important issue, especially when your dealing with fire , flammable liquid ,that is under pressure! 
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danduhman
wayne wrote:
If you buy one make sure it is rated ABC&D to cover all the bases.


As a side note their is no such animal as a ABC&D extinguished their are  A  ,BC, C ,ABC ,K &D each has its own specific uses and are all considered dry chemical ,their are also Co2, halotron, foam, halon 1211,and a number of other special application extinguishers.  A is water, K is a liquid that is for kitchen fires .
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Kmot
I'll be darned! [smile]

I just rapped on my little 2.5lb Kidde with a 1lb dead blow and sure enough after several raps it changed 'tone' and I can shake it now and hear the powder inside. Cool! Thanks Danny!
~Tom~

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0017

ICCC #1274
Quote
Kmot
I returned the tampered with "Kidde Garage and Shop" extinguisher today. Also, my wife was not crazy about the extra large size "Kidde Whole House" in the kitchen. I found instead a white painted "Kidde Kitchen" extinguisher with a wide mouth nozzle and so I got that as a replacement. The big boy is going into my garage as danduhman suggested. 
~Tom~

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0017

ICCC #1274
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magikbus
I remember the large foam floor models well.  When I was 6 years old I got curious about the "button the the bottom" of the fire extinguisher (which is what my parents told me turned it on).  You can guess the rest.
Stan
I always take the road less traveled, now where the h3ll am I?
Vancouver Island Branch ccf #0
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Deanofid
This sure has been a good thread, guys. It's commendable that so many of us
are diligent about this one critical thing.
Dan, thank you for your comments. It's nice to hear from someone in the business.
Thank you to all of you for the good discussion, too.

I have nothing to add since I know nothing about them except to keep a few
around the house and shop. One suggestion not related to the service and
function of them, though; A fire extinguisher makes a great gift. It may
sound a little funny, but try it some time for someone you love who doesn't
have one. I gave one to my mother as one of her gifts two Christmases ago.
I wrapped it nice and put a bow on. She was completely surprised, and though
I thought she would do the polite ladie's thing they do with an odd gift,
(the "Oh, how nice" phrase), she was very pleased. That surprised me, so it
was a win/win. She got that look that women get when they know you've done
something truely thoughtful for them.
I did the same thing for a girlfriend for her birthday, once. Again, she was
surprised in the best way, and got that look in her eyes. (The "good" look.)

A fire extinguisher and some flowers will put you on the top of her list. [smile]
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
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Kmot
I wanted to show off my cool vintage CO2 extinguisher. I am going to see if it can be re-certified and recharged.


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~Tom~

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #0017

ICCC #1274
Quote
danduhman
Kmot wrote:
I wanted to show off my cool vintage CO2 extinguisher. I am going to see if it can be re-certified and recharged.


You should not have a problem as long as it passes hydro , if it does not its junk, I have only seen one not pass ,and it was not a pretty scene it blew a sacrificial 3" thick piece of site glass out of the hydro testing cylinder and blew water all over the shop. 
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hikerduane
I called the company that services all the extinquishers at work.  They will not service them if over so many years.  I believe here in Nevada the lady said 10 years.  I'll ask some more, hate to see the ones I found go to waste or decoration.  $48 for a 5lb. ? one, ready to go, brand new.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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danduhman
Well Duane ,you peaked my curiosity and I went on line and did a little research and it looks like Nevada is operating under NFPA- 10 2009 edition which stated if a extinguisher is dated prior to 10/84 it must be replaced , this only applies to dry chemical extinguishers ,so if yours is older than that you need a new one unless it is for personal use in which case it does not matter how old it is as long as it is full of chemical and the gauge shows good use it and then toss it because you will not be able to get it filled. I am not sure wear they came up with the 10 year thing . It might just be their own rule ,you would sale a lot more extinguishers that way!
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Bob1774
Like others, I had a couple of Kidde 3 lbs. dry powders hanging for almost 20 years (kitchen, shop), and sure enough, the rubber mallet trick did its magic and the acoustical difference in sound was very easy to hear/feel as the powder "liquifies."

I'll plan to whack/shake these every six months when I do the smoke detector battery change each daylight savings time switch.  Also, this cycle probably keeps one rehearsed on where they are in an emergency and you're not thinking clearly!

Never knew this was an issue with these.  Might be a good thing for those in fire/safety positions to suggest that local fire officials share this during fire prevention week.  This would be perfect for a fireman to demonstrate on the local TV news that week.

Next plan is to take my CO2 for the garage in to be serviced, since it also has been neglected.

How horrible to think you're prepared, and your fire extinguisher is a dud when you need it.

Thanks, Dan!  You probably have save some property damage, or even lives here!
Bob
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hikerduane
Well Danny, I'm a Kalifornia resident, working way over here in Nevada, I'll see if my hometown company will service these or ask the Nevada company to, as they would be for my personal use.  Thank you for the research.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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Bob1774
Well, like many probably did here, I searched "Kidde," to see some additional information on what types, etc. I should keep and look for in the store.  What popped up was a recall.

Here is the recall if you have an XL model of Kidde, made in '07-'08

Description: This recall involves the Kidde XL Fire Extinguishers with model numbers FX340SC, FX340H, FX340GW, XL5MR, FX210R, FX340SC-2, FX210W, XL2.5TCZ-4, E-340-3 and with manufacture dates between October 2007 and April 2008. “Kidde” and the model number can be found on the label on the front of the extinguisher. The manufacture year is on the bottom of the extinguisher. If your extinguisher is one of the listed model numbers and is marked with the year 07 or 08, contact Kidde to determine if you have a recalled extinguisher.

http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2009/Kidde-Recalls-to-Replace-Fire-Extinguishers-Due-to-Failure-to-Operate/
Bob
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