200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
stoves1234
   I found a package deal today that included several items, including a 3-99 Model 288. Not that I need another 288, but when I naked burned it I had large yellow flames, which explains the soot-covered globe. For the first time in my fettling career I found very hard dirt deposits in the air tube and beneath it on the base. I got much of it out, but what can I soak the entire assembly in to loosen that crud up? If I'm correct the burner tubes are not removeable. If you're wondering why I'm screwing around with a 288, I had a knee replaced recently and this gives me something that I'm able to do.
Jim Brizzolara
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zoomkat
I suggest you put the burner assembly in hot soapy water and let it soak a while. Detergent breaks down the water surface tension and allows it to penetrate stuff better.
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Gunhippie
Others have recommended hydrogen peroxide, H2O2. Apparently, the "scrubbing bubbles" do a great job of getting the mud out. I use a very hot lye solution in an industrial-grade ultrasonic cleaner and never worry.

I suspect that, tucked into that little tube, what you're looking at are mason bee nests. Same procedure to get rid of them.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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JimL
+1 for the peroxide.  Someone explained a couple of years back that whatever was in the mud would only be thoroughly removed with hydrogen peroxide, the stuff you just may already have in the house.

-Jim

Have you ever imagined a world with no hypothetical situations?
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zoomkat
Be aware that any exposed steel surface will immediately start to rust when in contact with hydrogen peroxide. Drop an uncoated nail or iron based object in some and see it start to oxidize.
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stoves1234
     Hyrogen peroxide it is. Thanks for the replies, I'll bubble that crud out in the morning. 
Jim Brizzolara
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MYN
I don't have hydrogen peroxide at home. If there's any conveniently available around here, that would be low concentration solutions(below 6%) from the pharmacies.
Gut feeling is, these wouldn't have much effect on the nests. 30% or higher conc H2O2 is another story, though.
For those mud nests, I'd usually soak the entire air tube in some fairly concentrated alkaline engine degreasser overnight to break down all the enzymes or other organic stuffs that's holding the mud together. From my experience with these degreassers, they are often even more efficient than concentrated lye. My guess is that the contain wetting agents and some non ionic surfactants in addition to the basic potassium hydroxide, which in effect, could wet and penetrate the bound mud better and eventually disintegrates them.
Pure concentrated lye does not wet most surfaces very well.
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HercL4D2
One of the ladies that is nurse and member here or CCS explained that peroxide you get from a pharmacy breaks down the proteins the bugs use to cement the mud into bug cement. I tried it and was satisfied it does the trick. Boiling it in hot water also works. Just rinse it out with some Denatured alcohol keeps the rust from forming.
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HercL4D2
You can also use scrubbing bubbles. A product used to break down the proteins holding that nasty crud in toilet bowls.
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Chucker
Gunhippie wrote:
Others have recommended hydrogen peroxide, H2O2. Apparently, the "scrubbing bubbles" do a great job of getting the mud out. I use a very hot lye solution in an industrial-grade ultrasonic cleaner and never worry.

I suspect that, tucked into that little tube, what you're looking at are mason bee nests. Same procedure to get rid of them.


Not exactly Timm. 

Mason bees are, well bees. Mud daubers here in Michigan are wasps. The Mason's are opportunists when making their muddy nests using wood boring insect holes largely for their new homes. The Mud Daubers on the other hand simply make a full blown mud 'house', often connecting row after row of hardened concrete (not exactly, but you get the idea). 

I had to look up the Mason bees as we don't hear about them in the Mid-West. 

So, same product I'd say, just different insect and different construction. Mud Dauber's nest below.

Image result for mud dauber wasp nest
image courtesy of bing/ images.com
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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stoves1234
   Update- when I was out in my shed late last night I put the assembly in vinegar because it was on hand, planning on using hydrogen peroxide today. Turns out that the air and burner tubes are now clear. I cleaned all of the soot off of the lantern, super-glued the cracked globe, and now I have a good burning beater lantern that I won't mind lending out. The last lantern that I fettled was a 228B. There's a little bit of difference in the build quality between that lantern and this 288.
Jim Brizzolara
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Gunhippie
MYN: Playing with 30%+ H2O2 is like playing with fire--literally. Organics can become spontaneously explosive or flammable wne exposed to concentrated peroxide. I've used it as the oxidizer in liquid-fueled rocket engine (at 90%). It also bleaches and begins to dissolve skin instantly.

We're talking about he home-grade stuff at 3% or so.

Chuck: Our mud dauber nests look a little different from those--more compact and less tubular. Still not something you often find in a narrow tube. Stove bunsens, yes, but rarely lantern airtubes. Our mason bees love to fill a narrow tube--anything large enough to pass their pretty small bodies--with layered chambers made of rock-hard mud and filled with an egg and pollen. They love to clog up any tube between <1/4" and about 3/8" around my shop.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Mike
Excellent that the acid did the job for you. I've used regular old hydrogen peroxide from Walmart and while it doesn't dissolve the mud dauger gunk away, it does loosen it and comes out in a glob, as opposed to chipping and scraping it from the tubes. I used it on the vent tubes on a Tilley BR1A and after a couple of hours soak, a Q-Tip run through each tube pushed the glops out. And they were packed solid!

 P2290012a.jpg 

Easy-peasy-hydrogen-peroxide-squeasy!

Mike.
My best gal is a Coleman outing pal!
2 1/2 minutes to Midnight...
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MYN
Quite aware of the potency of conc.H2O2, Timm, but what was it that you've got to do with liquid rocket propellents? Were you in NASA or some ballistic missile programs or something?
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Gunhippie
I was a member of the local JD rocketry club. The local police were always asking to chaperone us--to the caboose. We had to have a license signed by the county sheriff and the fire marshall to buy Estes engines--which was not happening--so we made our own. Much more exciting, and hey, chicks dig scars!

Most of our liquid-fueled rocket experiments were spectacular failures--in that they did't go anywhere, just exploded. Recovering the little platinum screen was the important thing. Our solid-fuel engines had a far higher rate of success, often traveling a great distance before blowing up. Some control over the direction of travel would have been nice, 'though.

Back then, the school library had copies of books like The Boy's Book Of Rocketry and How To Blow Thing Up--A Delinquent's Guide. A kid could take a pocket full of change to the local museum (OMSI in my case) science store and buy pounds of chemicals that would get you put on a watch list these days. Potassium perchlorate, anyone?

Back on topic, here are some NW mud dauber nests:

[48260664907_eac874d265_b]

Far more compact than those shown in reply #10 above, but still too large for lantern tubes. I usually find them under the vent and inside the collar of lanterns.

These:

[P2290012a]

Are made by solitary bees--Mason Bees, Carpenter Bees, or Leaf Cutter bees. The partitions of mud (center tube) separate chambers filled with vegetable matter, on which the solitary egg in each chamber will hatch and the larva feed.

Not that it matters much when you just want to get them out.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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MYN
Model rocketry has never taken off in my part of the World. I'd guess that the authorities never made them legal here. Especially when you have something that's potentially explosive in the hands of the general public.
So, back on topic, the mud daubers around here are usually solitary wasps. Rarely I find bees making mud nests around.
Perhaps someone would come up with some sort of aerosolized cans for removing such nests.
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Gunhippie
I'm pretty sure our mud daubers are also solitary, with one female making each of the mud-ball nests shown in my pic above. The adults have extremely long pedicels, the "wasp-waist", so are fairly easy to recognize. They're about as peaceful as a wasp can be, and I don't think I've ever been stung by one, even when working in a cloud of them while tearing off old cedar shingles from a barn.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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BrianBo
This is what I know as mud daubers. Oh, that frayed wire brush trick works well too. Click image for larger version - Name: 7268B1BF-5B25-4CFE-AB5C-629AF65662B9.jpeg, Views: 27, Size: 103.98 KB
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MYN
I'd probably try out some experiments using different chemicals that could disperse the bound-mud. So that they could be easily flushed out with water.
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JeepJeepster
All this talk of clogged fa tubes, Ive het to find one with a single thing in it 
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NWMike
Now you've gone and done it.
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