200A and 202 reproduction
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Gunhippie
Everything came together last night for good viewing to the NW from my backyard.

[50129638783_cc0ff87345_b][50130428272_f147fb138b_b][50130428092_ee0a85cac4_b]

The first two images are different treatments of the same picture. ISO 10,000; f4.5; 1 sec @ 200mm w/1.5 crop-factor camera.

Third image is pretty heavily processed to try to show the length of the tails, and maybe a glimpse of the ion trail. ISO 10,000; f4.5; 1 sec @90mm, same camera.

I used my Nikon D7200 on a good tripod with a 70-200mm f2.8 lens. I screwed several things up as I was in a hurry to get the pics before the comet sank below the trees to the NW of me.

The first image was at 22:16, PDT. Second was at 22:44.

The comet was not visible to the eye at 21:30. By 22:00, it was visible using averted vision. By 22:15, it was clearly visible in foveal vision. Elevation was about 30 degrees above the horizon, which is a guess as I didn't use a clinometer and we don't really have a horizon.

I'll get out tonight and be better prepared.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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1hpycmpr
Nice, Timm!  We have had clouds build every afternoon and they linger until early morning.  Been going on for the last week.
Mark
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Gunhippie
It's been that way here since the comet became visible. Clouds building to the North every evening. Combined with the poor view to the NW and NE from down here in the valley, this is the first time I've had a chance to see it.

Let's hope tonight stays the same. It was excellent viewing last night.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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TwoCanoes
I was finally able to view it last night,too. At 22:15 my wife found it with her naked eye. I could see it only with binoculars (Tasco, 10x25). I went back out at 23:00.  Could barely make it out unaided after finding it with the binoculars.  Great photos, Timm. Thanks for posting them.
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Gunhippie
Howdy and thanks, Stewart!

I found my 8 X 32 binos to be too powerful. A nice set of 7 X 50s would be much better for this. My 20-60 X 72 spotting scope was utterly useless.

Better yet, a guided, ultra-fast, wide-angle telescope would be ideal. I'd love to be able to take some exposures of much longer time at lower ISOs to eliminate the noise and better resolve the ion trail (very faint above the big dust trail in my images).

For those looking tonight, remember that Stewart and I are near the eastern boundary of the PDT time zone. Those in the western parts of the NW would be advised to start looking about 15 minutes to a half-hour later.

Just set up a lawn chair, pour a beverage of your choice, and be out as soon as the sky is mostly dark. Look about six to ten fists held at arms length above the horizon a little to the north of northwest. Averted vision will resolve the comet first--look out of the corners of your eyes. As the sky darkens, you'll be able to see it clearly looking right at it (foveal vision). It's pretty good as a naked-eye object, but a pair of low power, large objective binos would be excellent. Old Navy 7 X 50s would be great.

Enjoy!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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74HARLEY
Thanks for the great pictures Timm!
Joe
looking for 200a 11-56,9-77,2-65 Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #0004 ICCC #1262
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #19
Frank appreciation syndicate member #9
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SteveRetherford
it kinda looks like a hole in the sky with light coming thru :-) nice pics !!!
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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Mister Wilson
We went out to look at it again last night, definitely better than last Monday.  Yes, 7x50 binoculars worked great, my spotting scope was also pretty worthless.  The tail was more pronounced and “longer”.  I’m glad we had a couple of good opportunities to see it.
BTW, nice pictures Timm.
John
H.C. Lanterns dealer
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #2001 A Turd's Odyssey
Canadian Blues #028
Coleman Slant Saver #31
Looking for 6-56 and 6-58 Birthday lanterns.
There's been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about.
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Gunhippie
Weather permitting, I'll do better tonight. I just went through all the settings (there are lots of them) on my D7200 to optimize it for astrophotography. Of course, the biggest problem is not having a tracking equatorial head, so my exposure times are limited and require the use of very high ISOs, hence high noise.

One grrr... about the Nikon body: I can't turn off the illuminated data display in the viewfinder. I let my eyes get good and adjusted to the dark, then accidentally hit the shutter button and I'm night-blind. Grrr....

A point for those of you trying to photograph this: Auto focus will not (likely) lock onto stars. You'll have to focus manually. Best way to do this, if you have a parfocal zoom lens, is to zoom in to highest power and then zero in on the focus by going past it each way, making the swings smaller each time until it's perfectly clear. If your zoom isn't parfocal (it changes focus as you zoom), select the zoom setting that you want and use the same procedure. Same goes for fixed-focus lenses.

Another trick is to use distant city/farm lights to focus. Get an auto-focus lock on something that's miles away and it'll be pretty close to infinity. Switch back to manual focus to keep the setting.

Be aware that most lenses will focus beyond infinity, so you can't just focus all the way out. No idea why they make them like this.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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DougA
I spotted it late the other night here and last night I was going to try to get some pictures but we had a fair bit of haze.  Combined with the city lights I couldn't even see the "bowl" of the Big Dipper.  I'll keep trying.
DougA  ... fettler and keeper of a family collection of nickel: a 249, a pair of 237s, and a 1938 228B, along with a late 1979 red 200a.  Then two more turned up, a 1941 243A and a 1944 242C, and now there's a b-day 200A lantern, too!.
Coleman Blues Member #92.
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #009.
Perfection Heater Collectors #5 
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Gunhippie
it kinda looks like a hole in the sky with light coming thru :-) nice pics !!!


Excellent description that hadn't occurred to me!

It's actually more colorful to the naked eye.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Smudge
Great photos! 
"If all the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit, for whatever happens to the beasts,
also happens to the man. Whatever befalls the Earth, befalls the sons of the Earth.” - Chief Seattle

ICCC # 1726  -  Bernz0matiC Appreciation Club #057
Perfection Heater Collectors #6
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bngreenchev
Glad you found it, as for spotting the second ion tail I had to change my white balance and shoot a longer exposure, nice pics btw.
DSC00453_DxO copy.jpg 
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BSAGuy
Very cool, Timm.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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Flyboyfwa
Great pictures Timm! I got out to see it the last 4 nights. Fortunately, it has been clear almost every night. 
Andy
Mil-Spec Ops #199
Coleman Slant Saver #54
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #06
275 Appreciation Syndicate #1970
The Coleman Blues 243's #159

ICCC #1741
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outlawmws
That is Awesome Timm!  Great Pics!

Yours too Bngreen!
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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Dvan95
Whoa! Those are some excellent photos you took. I know nothing about photography but that is really cool!! 
-Dan

Coleman Quick Lite Crew #048

 Anyone have a 6/95 birthday lantern?
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Gasman64
Nice photos, Timm, I like those.  Robert, yours is nice, too.  Thanks, guys, for doing what most of us cannot (photograph the comet.)
Wouldn't you know it, more than a few clouds moved in here Sunday evening. 😟
Steve
ICCC #1012
logoballistol logo 1a.png

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Banjoman
Thx for the pics Timm if it wasn’t for ur pics I’d see nothin up here in the GWN TOO CLOUDY 
DARRELL
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Gunhippie
Very good work, Robert! That's what I tried to capture. Forgot and left the WB on Auto.

Robert's picture shows the orientation of the comet as you would see it. I tried to align mine to catch as much of the tail as possible.

Skies to the north were very dirty last night, so I turned my back on them and looked to the south with my spotting scope. Jupiter and Saturn are a few fingers apart in the SSE right now, and make for an awesome display with a decent spotting scope. Using my Bushnell Skymaster II, 20-60 X 60mm, I was able to easily see the rings of Saturn--nearly flat-on so perfect--and the four Galilean moons of Jupiter! No pics, as I don't have any way to shoot through the 'scope. If you have a spotting scope, take a look!

@bngreenchev

Care to share your settings and camera? I'm suspecting that you're using a full-frame digital based on how little noise you have in that exposure.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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