200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
onerednek
I noticed a lot of you have found a way to bring a very high mirrored look to your nickel. I have gotten mine very clean and shiny, but havent made the high shine to it. What is your secret?
Don
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GeraldJP
I don't have an answer for you, but I'm curious to hear what others have done.
Gerald

"If we are to have any hope for the future, those who have lanterns must pass them on to others." - Plato
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holliswood
I’ve had better success using Mother’s Mag & Aluminum polish. I haven’t got brave enough to use anything other than hand buffing though. Could be it only gets as good as the nickel is to start with though. 
Mil-SpecOps #1278
snipesfred on Insta
Looking for B-Day 1978 Armstrong MilSpec 
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ecblanks
Some pieces just shine up better than others.  I've got one 228D that required very little effort to get that mirror shine, and another which was starting to wear down to the brass. Most of my 237's are "freckled" meaning the nickel has pitted down to the brass.  My older 1930's stuff seems to all shine up really well.
I just use Mother's after decruding. 
Carlton - 9/73
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973

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Jayhawksr
Like others I've used Mothers Mag Polish and have had great results.  But a lot depends on the condition of the fount.  I have a Quick-lite that cleaned up but never made it super-shinny.  The fount was very dirty and tarnished before I started.  I've done two 228Ds that were tarnished but not crusty like the Quick-lite and they shined up nicely with Mothers.  Remember, heed all the warnings to much polishing will removed the finish down to the brass.  I do my Mothers polishing with 0000 steel wool (wiping with rags) to start and then finish with rags to buff.
Richard (KC native and KU Alumni living in Maryland)
Rock Chalk, Jayhawk. Go KU!
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1983
Mil Spec Syndicate #1983
Eagle Scout Class of '83
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Banjoman
Ive got a 200 that never did polish up from using mothers but it only got to look like pewter but it’s so kool looking I just left it
darrell
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Gunhippie
I use the Mother's and 4-0 steel wool after a deep clean with lye followed by a mild acid. Be careful with the acid--I use dilute phosphoric and only let the fount and other plated parts soak in it for maybe 30 seconds! As soon as any exposed brass starts to turn pink or red, it's time for a rinse in hot water.

After I polish the fount with the Mother's and fine steel wool, I buff the remaining polish off with a soft rag buffing wheel chucked in my drill press set to the lowest speed. I haven't buffed through the nickel yet, and I can use a fair amount of pressure while buffing with the soft wheel. I wouldn't recommend anything harder than a stitched rag wheel.

Then another good scrub down with a rag and dish soap to get the last of the Mother's off, buff dry with a soft cloth and a good coat of a high quality car wax to keep that shine.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Mike
Depending on your photo lighting, it can make the nickel in an image look pretty impressive. I've posted some images here that  I look at and say, "Dang, I wish it looked that shiny in person!"

A mild citric acid bath here bathed on with 0000 steel wool and super light finger pressure--no scrubbing. A hand polish with Mothers after a water rinse, and repeat if necessary. I'll use a soft buffing wheel on a 1700rpm motor with light pressure if I think a bit more shine is still there. My old 3450rpm buffer with felt wheel is strictly for mirror polishing brass or steel if desired.

As Banjoman said above, there are Canadian 200s out there that are the anti-shining!

Mike.
My best gal is a Coleman outing pal!
2 1/2 minutes to Midnight...
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Gunhippie
As Mike said above.

Looks mirror-shiny:

[48284400697_d81e5f9ba0_b]

Up close:

[48284508066_06b06fccac_b]

Can I get those scratches out (they were pre-exisitng)? Yes, but I'd likely have a polished brass fount.

I rarely see a nickel plated fount without scratches like that. I attribute them to"tough love": obsessive cleaning with an abrasive cleaner like Comet or Scotchbrite pads.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Flyboyfwa
I agree with Mike and Timm. I have had lanterns that I polished that didn't look that great in person, but when I took a picture from the right angle look spectacular. The farther away, the more the scratches and pits blend in, just like in Timm's pictures. 

I currently use the oven cleaner method and then mothers on mine. Since I learned about it from here it has significantly improved my results. I do believe that most of it is the starting condition of the nickel.

Timm's picture of the 2 nickel 200's side by side is one of my favorite Coleman pictures.
Andy
Mil-Spec Ops #199
Coleman Slant Saver #54
275 Appreciation Syndicate #1970
ICCC #1741
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onerednek
Thanks guys. It looks like I need to buy a buffing wheel. Hand polish doesn’t seem to bring the mirror finish for me 
Don
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mnhogrider
Like as been said, some nickel finishes are better than others. I’ve found Canadian nickel polishes up best. 
I start with Easy Off oven cleaner (Lye), then Mothers and a soft rag. I’ve been staying away from wool.
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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Gand28
Buffing wheel can get you a shiny brass fount if you aren’t careful. 
Greg -- Fiat Lux!
ICCC Member #1273
Seeker of Canadian Nickel!
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onerednek
Good point Greg. I’ve been setting the founts in white vinegar which seems to do good on the oxidation and mother’s mag polish to buff by hand. 
Don
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Gunhippie
As Greg points out, it's not hard to polish right through the nickel. Use a soft, stitched-rag wheel about 6" dia, and run it slow--this is why I use it on my drill press with the belt on the slowest setting. Most bench grinders run at 3600 or so rpm, which is too fast. NEVER use a buffing compound or rouge! These are far too abrasive. Buffing with Mother's or another fine polish is all you need.

Also be aware that a buffing wheel's main desire is to rip the parts from your hands and throw them forcefully across the room--hence I call mine my "parts tosser"! As much as possible, buff from the flat towards any edges or the wheel will catch and there goes your shiny fount. I keep one finger inside the pump tube and another in the fuel bung (when possible) for a better grip.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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