200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
SloMetalDoc
Afternoon all,
I am going to attempt a little bit of zinc plating for some random bits and pieces (maybe a whole fount‽) and got to thinking...  What did coleman originally use on the burner frames?  Did a quick search and found a few posts that mentioned zinc - but nothing outright said it...Seems to me like a zinc plating on the older models due to the characteristic white powdery deposits one can find on well 'seasoned' lamps.  Newer ones appear to me as if they could be an aluminizing process.

I have yet to haul pieces to work and zap them with my XRF gun... maybe if i remember on monday...
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Chucker
Nickel on the air tubes since Quick-lites (maybe sooner?). Brass burner pipes, brass or nickel burner caps, brass mixing chamber up top.

Don't want to be around when someone heats up zinc. Bad mojo odors. I guess it "volatizes" when heated. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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SloMetalDoc
More referring to the later stamped steel burner frames.  220/228/222etc.

ZInc's melting point was on my mind (its vapor pressure is greater than atmospheric, so it essentially boils/fumes when it melts) - and will make you sicker than snot for a couple days.  Luckily its not really lethal, nor a cumulative toxin like lead/cadmium/etc., no reason to go burning rod's on your gate at home without precautions (few beers oughta do it!). 🙂
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Chucker
In that case, the newer materials, yes they look like aluminized steel to me. 

I just bought two slightly used lanterns at a flea; a 290a Power house and a 288. I disassembled them and sprayed both burner assy's with high temp silver and the founts and frame base with clear Engine Enamel.

My precautions with the newer one's since those are two glaring short-lived parts. Also, since the mid 90's you can find 286's and 290 burner frames with brass tubes. I'm a believer in those. The previous one's just tended to burn, crack apart, and rust way too soon.  
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Dmacp
they used different plating over the years. Most of it did not hold up very well. Inside the burner cage is a pretty corrosive environment.
I bead blast the frames, paint them with VHT and then oven cure them a 400° for an hour. If the air tube is plated I mask it off.
Dan
ICCC member #604
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SloMetalDoc
Thats pretty much what I’ve been doing, with good results if i don’t say so myself.  Just generally pondering other applications of my little zinc plating setup. 

Thanks!

Dmacp wrote:
they used different plating over the years. Most of it did not hold up very well. Inside the burner cage is a pretty corrosive environment.
I bead blast the frames, paint them with VHT and then oven cure them a 400° for an hour. If the air tube is plated I mask it off.
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outlawmws
I would NOT  recommend zinc plating burner parts!  welders grind or chemically remove zinc from zinc plated parts for a reason - After its burned it tuns into this yellow "stuff" that is highly toxic...
[Logo%20Outlaw-half]  Coleman Blue's 243's #341


“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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SloMetalDoc
Not planning on it - was generally curious.

Most smart welders do (I'm a welding engineer)...unless under a harvesting crunch and burning rod in the field! 🙂  In all seriousness, fuming zinc will cause metal fume fever, which has been described to me as "the worst flu you've ever had", but ultimately zinc is not really 'highly toxic'.  Your body needs zinc for various things so therefore has processes to dispose of excess amounts.  Now if you already have existing health issues - then it might be considered 'highly-toxic' as it could aggravate some of those conditions.

Not to say I recommend welding on galvanized metal - that'll get a tongue lashing from this engineer.  But woe to the SOB who brings Cd-plated steel and strike an arc on it...or Be-containing metals into my machines.  Thats a paddlin'. 🙂


outlawmws wrote:
I would NOT  recommend zinc plating burner parts!  welders grind or chemically remove zinc from zinc plated parts for a reason - After its burned it tuns into this yellow "stuff" that is highly toxic...
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Gunhippie
220/8Es definitely had a zinc-plated frame and collar. Some later had other platings, which might include white cadmium.

As I was taught, some cadmium is a common contaminant in hot-dipped galvanizing, hence the hazards of welding such.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Chucker
Since painting some frames with the high temp silver just doesn't look good to me - I've started going down to bare steel and hitting them with clear engine enamel. It retains a weathered look but slows the rust for years to come. Some prefer a high temp 'cast' metal spray paint which on some looks fine. 

Just did that to a 327 Quick-lite and '58 Canadian 200. The 327 is around 97 years old and is going camping with us this month. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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SloMetalDoc
I like that idea, especially for one that’s not getting a 100% rebuild.  Would be interesting in seeing that if you have any pictures.  No worries if not. 🙂

Thanks!

Chucker wrote:
Since painting some frames with the high temp silver just doesn't look good to me - I've started going down to bare steel and hitting them with clear engine enamel. It retains a weathered look but slows the rust for years to come. Some prefer a high temp 'cast' metal spray paint which on some looks fine. 

Just did that to a 327 Quick-lite and '58 Canadian 200. The 327 is around 97 years old and is going camping with us this month. 
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Chucker
The 327 is in our dining room as I write this so when I get home tonight I'll take some pics. Remember, when you see the pics this thing had ZERO bare metal showing - it was all rusted. I did citric acid and heated the whole shootin' match in a ss stock pot in my wife's kitchen. No fallout from that tho'. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Chucker
Here you go Nick. Not an A-1 job by any means but it is functional and a runner, not a shelf queen:327-1 July 2019.jpg 
327-2 2019.jpg 
327-3 2019.jpg 

Got this one at a yard sale over Memorial Weekend near us for $6. Only one coat of Clear Engine Enamel.

The vent and fount were covered with about 1/16in. of dust or whatever from over the years. It came with a complimentary sliced up Havoline oil can reflector that I may put back on. Kinda cool. It is sporting a handsome Fred K mica there. I cleaned the R55 up with muriatic acid - I know, I take precautions. 
Again, the frame and bail were ALL rusted and probably sat in their garage since the 1960's or earlier. 

Oh yeah, the collar was FILLED with mud dauber homes. Comes with the territory sometimes.
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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ecblanks
I tried the high temp clear coat one time and it darkened  and yellowed during the curing process, but it's entirely possible I did something wrong. 
Carlton - 9/73
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973

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Chucker
Carlton, it may have been the paint you used. I find the VHT Flame proof clear tends to do what you describe. I used the VHT brand on this one but simply 'engine enamel'. 

Also, this 327 has only been run 4 or 5 times since I painted it. I'll PM you if it turns yellow down the road. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Asbestos
The frame should not get hot enough to melt the zinc. The top nut and screw probably would over time But the frames certainly appear to be galvanized or electroplated.
Pithy saying wanted- will pay cash for wit.

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SloMetalDoc
Confirmation of aluminized steel. I tested two 222 heat shields and a burner cap with an XRF gun this morning. 
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Phredd
I made a homemade galvanizing setup (a big 8 gal bucket, wires, zinc sulfate etc) to put new a new coat on some 220F frames.  No rust so far for 4 years in the humid rust enhancing environment of my garage.  But I will say I never could get a real smooth finish.  And it is a lot of work.  So lately I have switched to high-temp silver - quick and easy and will hopefully let the frames age well for another 50 years.... 
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Jay C B
Phredd wrote:
I made a homemade galvanizing setup (a big 8 gal bucket, wires, zinc sulfate etc) to put new a new coat on some 220F frames.  No rust so far for 4 years in the humid rust enhancing environment of my garage.  But I will say I never could get a real smooth finish.  And it is a lot of work.  So lately I have switched to high-temp silver - quick and easy and will hopefully let the frames age well for another 50 years.... 


Specifically, what brand/part number is the paint that you are using?

Thanks,
Jay
Some would rather curse the darkness than light a Coleman lantern...
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