200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Northman49
With all the spare time I have now I thought I would try some nickel plating using Youtube  videos as a reference. I plated 3 small items. A copper plumbing cap, a 1/4" air hose fitting (brass) and a schraeder tube (brass/silver solder). The results were good and the copper cap came out the best...super nice shine. Not sure if the silver solder on the schraeder valve had any effect on the plating.
IMG_3870__1585882201_86857.jpg  Making the nickel acetate solution takes a few hours, but the actual plating is quite fast...10 min max. IMG_3871__1585882298_10673.jpg
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
Mister Wilson
Wow, pretty good results!
John
H.C. Lanterns dealer
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #2001 A Turd's Odyssey
Canadian Blues #028
Coleman Slant Saver #31
Looking for 6-56 and 6-58 Birthday lanterns.
There's been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about.
Quote
mgmlvks
That is cool.  I was thinking along same lines.  If this keeps going - I will be trying some plating!
Mike, ICCC member #1156, Slant Saver Group #011, 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0215, FAS #20 - Confusing Future Generations of Collectors One Lantern at a Time
"In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present"
Francis Bacon
(and - for those who have asked - avatar from postcard and says "Coming Home by Rail".  https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4595/27430282209_39a564be00_z.jpg
 
 
Quote
bowenstudios
Those turned out nice.

This looks like a great use of all the free time at home lately. Would it be too much to ask you to share some of the better videos you watched? 
-Mike
______________________________________

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #651
Mil-SpecOps #0651
The Coleman Blue's 243's #154
Quote
Northman49
Lots of videos. This one is very basic. To make the solution I use a 12v battery charger. To do the plating 3-6 volts is best. Make sure the parts are absolutely clean before plating.
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
MrAlexxx
Cool. I want to try that sometime on something.  lol


Alex
Quote
Whitegas Extraordinaire
The substrate finish will affect the brilliance of the plating, if you want brilliance I’m pretty sure you want to start with highly polished parts.
Many brass fittings are bright dripped as well so you probably want to remove that prior coating too? Probably not an issue with lantern parts!
TY
K
I frighten easily!

My current shade is Coleman!!

To me a lamp without a shade is creepy!

ICCC # 1865

Quote
Whitegas Extraordinaire

Another item of note, when plating threaded parts keep in mind the nickel adds to the OD of the parts and more importantly the threads. In the late 80's I was working for a fitting manufacturer and they would always cut nickel plated parts slightly smaller so the finished thread once plated was within SAE tolerances.
Fast forward 10 years and the nickel plated versions of standard pneumatic fittings a multi billion dollar company were just standard parts with NP added. You can guess which ones worked and fit better.
Most NP Coleman burner tubes I have seen they did not completely NP the threaded portion of them.

Just some of my past experience!

BTW I think you did very well with your first NP.

TY

Kevin

I frighten easily!

My current shade is Coleman!!

To me a lamp without a shade is creepy!

ICCC # 1865

Quote
Snotraveler
Awesome job! I’ve tried zinc plating. Now I might have to try some nickel. What did you use for an anode?
ICCC #1907
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #065
Quote
Northman49
EBay cheap Chinese pure nickel electroplating rods. You can probably get it local.
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
Gunhippie
Great job!

Not surprised the copper fitting came out so well. Show-quality nickel and chrome plating starts with several layers of copper plate over a polished surface, then another polish, then the final coats.

Would a nickel (currency) work to make the solution and as an electrode? I have a drawer full of them.

If 3-6V is ideal, a computer power supply generally has 3V and 5V outputs. Pretty easy to scrounge from a retired computer.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
JimL
>>Would a nickel (currency) work to make the solution and as an electrode? I have a drawer full of them.

Taken from wikipedia:
A nickel, in American usage, is a five-cent coin struck by the United States Mint. Composed of 75% copper and 25% nickel...

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


There is a very fine line between hobby and mental illness. - Dave Barry
Quote
Gunhippie
Yeah, I just checked that out. US mint says they recently went up to 80% Cu. Better for bright copper plating, I guess!

Dang. I was looking forward to TIG welding a bunch of 'em together to make an electrode.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Northman49
A nickel welding rod (pure of course) with flux coating removed has been used with success, not by me though.  Am in the process of plating another object..stay tuned.
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
Gunhippie
Have you tried using a copper undercoat yet?
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Gunhippie
I'm in!
I just ordered these nickel strips: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07811NCH3/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

and, being a lazy sort, some copper sulfate and nickel acetate crystals. If I'm happy with the results, I'll learn to make my own.

I got the copper sulfate as I'd like to try going for show-grade platings with polished copper underplate. Thinking my BDay 228E would look sharp with some nickel-plate.

Of course, with Azon's non-essential item shipping slowdown, it'll be around the end of the month before this stuff gets here. 🙁

I'll try my computer PS at 3V to start, but can use batteries if that doesn't work out well.

Thanks for the inspiration, Ed!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Northman49
Be careful on those nickel strips. For that price it may be nickel  plated steel...ask me how I know.  The key word is "consists"... like the famous ..."made with 100% beef...the beef they use is 100% beef, the rest is NOT.  To be safe you should only consider nickel for electroplating.
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
Gunhippie
Several of the reviews mentioned using these strips for nickel-plating with good results. Let's hope those reviews were the real McCoys!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Northman49
I think it's the other way around...you have to copper plate steel b4 plating nickel.I don't deny  steel can be nickel plated in one step but by some other process other than DIY. But it does work straight on brass.
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
Gunhippie
Steel wants a copper coat first, then the nickel. To see why, look at the directly nickel-plated steel frames and collars on some 242s. Usually little or no nickel left, while the nickel-plated brass fount will usually have stood up pretty well.

The best chrome jobs I've seen are copper over polished steel, then nickel over polished copper, then chrome over polished nickel. My 1960 Schwinn Paramount (Schwinn's top -of-the-line racing and touring bike) has chrome like this on the head lugs, and it just glows. Ive seen show cars with the same plating process and you can fall into the chrome just looking at it.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Lant_ern
Canadian nickles pre 1981 are a source .

Looking for a 7-55 Canadian lantern       Ernie
BRIGHTER IS BETTER
Canadian Blues # 37
Quote
outlawmws
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel_(Canadian_coin)

1965-1981
and 
1922-1942
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


Quote
74HARLEY
This is getting really interesting! I am also interested in "diy" plating. 
Joe
looking for 200a 11-56,9-77,2-65 Coleman 275 appreciation syndicate member #0004 ICCC #1262
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #19
Frank appreciation syndicate member #9
Quote
staylit
Very impressive!
Quote
Gunhippie
I'm lovin' it!

[50030235613_767b4d97a4_b]

Thanks for my new addiction, Ed!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Northman49
I tried plating a fount. Results were uninspiring. Good coverage but no mirror finish. Any suggestions?
IMG_3876__1593963400_69513__1593963400_18232.jpg  IMG_3954__1593963671_41729.jpg  IMG_3955__1593963735_36711.jpg 
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
outlawmws
Polish before and  polish after.  the trick will be to keep/get the polishing compound residue off before plating.
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


Quote
Northman49
Polish or buff?.
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
Gunhippie
The fount needs to be highly polished before plating. The nature of the plating process is to deposit more plating on high points and edges, thus emphasizing any surface defects. "Paint conceals, plating reveals".

I've been warned by a friend who has lots of experience in plating--he worked in a bronze foundry--that most rouges have a wax base that is almost impossible to remove. Next to a fine finish, absolute cleanliness is paramount.

He told me that the foundry found a green rouge that did not have a wax base, but couldn't recall the name.

I haven't tackled a fount yet myself, but have been giving it some thought. I've done a couple of fairly large projects, and, once again, the final finish is dependent on the finish you start with.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Tgarner01
I have no experience in plating but I believe I read somewhere, maybe here that there are different anodes of nickel as well.. Some are made to be polished? I have everything bought up and ready... Just have not done it yet. Sounds like a fun project ðŸ˜
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
Quote
Gunhippie
Tgarner01 wrote:
I have no experience in plating but I believe I read somewhere, maybe here that there are different anodes of nickel as well.. Some are made to be polished? I have everything bought up and ready... Just have not done it yet. Sounds like a fun project Ã°Å¸ËœÂ


Anodes are pure nickel. It's the electrolyte solution that varies, as well as the temperature, voltage and amperage.

I'm using nickel acetate for my solution @130-140F; a computer power supply taped at 3.3 V and getting very nice results.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
Rfieldbuilds
Gunhippie wrote:


Anodes are pure nickel. It's the electrolyte solution that varies, as well as the temperature, voltage and amperage.

I'm using nickel acetate for my solution @130-140F; a computer power supply taped at 3.3 V and getting very nice results.
 
have you measured the amp draw?   I understand thats  also important  
Randy
QL #15, Slant Saver #59, #0269 Turd Hurdler, 0269 Mil Spec Syndicate, BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #072, and a few others too.
Quote
Northman49
Gunhippie wrote:


Anodes are pure nickel. It's the electrolyte solution that varies, as well as the temperature, voltage and amperage.

I'm using nickel acetate for my solution @130-140F; a computer power supply taped at 3.3 V and getting very nice results.


And what are you plating?. Small items? 
She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but I loved her still.

I keep my tools sharp...but my mind sharper!
  Ed
                 ICCC no.1880
                 CANADIAN BLUES Member #023
     
                  Mil-spec ops #1982
Quote
Duck
Are you doing anything to the computer power supply like adding a sandbar resistor to trick it into thinking its still attached to the motherboard?

Joe
Mil-SpecOps #0219
Stovie and Damn proud of it

”life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It’s the transition that’s troublesome!” Isaac Asimov 
 In my defense I was a little drunk and was left unattended!

Quote
Gasman64
Interesting stuff, Ed, thanks for sharing your results.  I might just try a thing or two sometime.
Steve
ICCC #1012
🍂🍂🍂 Waiting For Autumn🍂🍂🍂
logoballistol logo 1a.png

Quote
Gunhippie
Ed: This is the largest project I've taken on:

[49839190547_25e5418af7_b]

Only thing I didn't plate/replate was the fount.

Randy: I've stuck my Fluke into the circuit and I'm mostly drawing between 300 to 500 milliamps.

Joe: The only thing you need to do to the computer PS--I'm using ATX size--is to connect the green wire in the bundle coming out of the PS to one of the black common wires. I put a switch in there so I can turn the PS on and off without unplugging it. I did a write-up on it a while back. I'll see if I can find it.

Here it is! https://www.colemancollectorsforum.com/post/making-your-electroplatingelectrolsis-power-supply-from-an-old-computer-10512910?pid=1311496661
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
drumbum
Gunhippie wrote:
Ed: This is the largest project I've taken on:

[49839190547_25e5418af7_b]

Only thing I didn't plate/replate was the fount.

Randy: I've stuck my Fluke into the circuit and I'm mostly drawing between 300 to 500 milliamps.

Joe: The only thing you need to do to the computer PS--I'm using ATX size--is to connect the green wire in the bundle coming out of the PS to one of the black common wires. I put a switch in there so I can turn the PS on and off without unplugging it. I did a write-up on it a while back. I'll see if I can find it.

Here it is! https://www.colemancollectorsforum.com/post/making-your-electroplatingelectrolsis-power-supply-from-an-old-computer-10512910?pid=1311496661


Well, smut me runnin...that's awesome Tim!
Quote


...
...
Welcome to the Coleman Collectors Forum, an international forum of Coleman enthusiast and collectors, as such people from all over the world come here to read about Coleman collecting, repair, and to meet and make friends. The pages contained here are intended for the use of amateur collectors and people interested in Coleman collecting, restoration and repair as a hobby. It goes without saying to refrain from political posts, personal attacks and inflammatory posts.

Please note, all postings are the personal opinions of the members posting, the owner, administrators and moderators of the forum do not warrant the accuracy of posted information or endorse the safety of such.