200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

highdesert

The more I read the more I realize that de-fueling a lantern or stove that will be idle for awhile is the thing to do. So my latest question is how do you go about doing it? Just up-end the tank and pour it out? Pump it out with a hand pump? Siphon it? Just wondering how the Pros do it without making a big mess of the finish and surrounding areas. Thanks again!

Shaun, ICCC #979
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firebell71
If I remember correctly, Dan Boschen crafted replica's of fount drains that consisted of a cork-plug type deal for the bung with a piece of shaped copper tubing...you would put that in the fount bung and pressurize the fount. The pressure would drain out the fuel thru the tube. It was pretty slick! The design was based on an old Coleman design...
- John 
John B. aka "Kato"
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TJT

I dump and shake the fount into a funnel with a coffee filter in it back into a fuel can for reuse. I then let it sit with the cap off for a few days or more and let any remaining fuel evaporate.

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SteveRetherford

when i want a dry fount , i find there is only one good way for me , dump what you can and then use compressed air with a rubber hose stuck inside the found and blow it out till dry .

[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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AzWolf
I'm not a Pro - I just use the old "six-foot aquarium hose and gravity" method. Set a wood block under one edge to tilt the fount about 30 degrees or so, hold the hose at the lowest spot, and suck.

It starts "going" pretty quick - hence the 6' hose, so I don't get a mouthful of fuel!

Once it's empty I let Mother Nature and evaporation do the rest.

Lee

Lee
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curtludwig
For snowmobiles I took a squeeze bulb primer (like you'd use to prime a boat motor) and 2 lengths of 1/4" fuel hose.
They sell "siphon fuel transfer" hoses that are the same thing EXCEPT the squeeze bulb primers for snowmobiles or boats have check valves built right into them... I bet I could size down to a piece of 1/8" primer line to make it work well in a lantern. If you use the clear fuel line for the upstream size and leave it in the sun it'll mold to whatever shape you want. Use blue fuel line for the downstream side and it'll stay flexible to go to your container.

I'm pretty lazy, in the past I've just dumped but I like this idea and I think I have some clear primer line leftover from another project...

Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
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Murff
Wouldn't a turkey baster work as well with a small length of tubing on it. Suck out the fuel and then deposit same into a container.

I have also used the spray assembly out of a squirt bottle. Put the tube in the fount and start squeezing the sprayer. Once the majority of the fuel is out, I use the compressor to dry out the rest of the fount.

Murff

Name: Murff   ICCC Member #726 
Coleman Blue's 243's #002   Ebay Handle: Happy-campers2 
EX-ICCC Newsletter Editor & Full time Coleman Addiction Enabler
Part-time Idito and Hater of Turd 275s
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Ramaniac

I am not a pro, and I ruined my wife's last turkey baster when I did my brakes, so if she has one she is hiding it.  I use the dump and evaporate method.  If I was a pro I would make it much harder, and rig some sort of counterbalanced suction air tube with a frizzenator.  Unless it was Tuesday.  Then I would use a molenator 3000 duh!

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Jim_l
I think I might have said this before.
Jim, YOU AIN'T RIGHT!!
   Jim

Matthew 5:16: "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." Jim-- Coleman Blues Member #014
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morgantruce
No one seems to mention what they do with the fuel that they drain out.  My Coleman lanterns all burn kerosene.  If I find one lantern with kerosene sitting inside longer than what seems good, I drain it out and dump it into an Aladdin or other wick type lamp  where it gets used up. Nothing goes to waste.

Rather than dry out the Colemans, I just refill them with fresh kerosene.  I figure this is better insurance against a rusted fount bottom.  The whole process is a bit labor intensive, but mine is a small collection.

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jayhawk
I use a vacuum brake bleeder. I've had it for years and only used it a couple of times. It's the hand pump kind, I think I got it at Wally World. I tip the lantern over a little with a block under one side and siphon it out. I let it air dry after that. I have one old Coleman can that I use to dump fuel back into. I use that fuel for testing or in stoves. I do filter it through a coffee filter if it comes out of that can.
Kevin
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spotlight
I use a turkey baster with a short piece of surgical tube attached to the end. Works like a charm. Then I shake em out real good.
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Quicklite

I use one of those pumps you can mount on an electric drill with two hoses, one to go into the fount and the other into a can of used Coleman fuel to be reused of course.  After that I blast it with my air compressor hose to finish it off then let it sit awhile to air out.  Appears to work pretty good, especially on those big lamp founts with the deep fuel neck and stove founts.    -Q

Jules Sooo out of storage space, BUT always room for just one more ARC lantern.
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curtludwig
I dumped one last night, I usually dump into an old spaghetti sauce jar. The glass jar lets me see any contaminants or water then I can decide what to do with it.
Curt

2017 ICCC Convention Host

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #019

http://www.youtube.com/c/lanternlabs
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Scouterjan
I also dump and shake, leave the cap off. All the ones in the house have dry fonts, but the regular guys I always leave fuel in, and there is no such thing as OLD fuel. I have got lanterns/lamps that I have picked up that the fuel must be years old. If it doesn't smell off, I just add it back to the can of fuel, strain through a filter funnel, and use it in the next one. Just my 2 Loonies worth
Jan


Mitakiuye Oyasin " All My Relations"
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Ramaniac
I clean a quart mason jar and use that to get a look at my fuels.  Then I pour that in my my oldest can.  I got a coffee filter and put that in a big black funnel just to make sure nothing real big got in there. 

Jim_l: I am in very good company here on this site!!  We all know what we are and who is really beyond help.  

Can I get an AMEN my brothers????
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Scouterjan

AMEN



Mitakiuye Oyasin " All My Relations"
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ClayC

I make sure there is a good mantle on the lantern.  I then pressurize the fount.  After that I light a match and hold it near the mantle, while turning the fuel valve open.  This way, the gas drains out of the top of the lantern, and has this wonderful effect of making light while it's draining.  As long as I keep the tank pressurized, I know the tank is empty when the light goes out.  Neat trick....you should try it.

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Scouterjan
heck, I dump and shake as well, re use the fuel, but to get it really dry, I light a match and pass it over the fuel filler neck
Jan


Mitakiuye Oyasin " All My Relations"
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hurricaner
The worse ones are the old round stove tanks. They have a tube that extends into the tank to keep you from overfilling. It is not possible to dump them as it leaves about an 1/8 of a tank of fuel. The siphon or the pump is about the only option other than pulling the valve.

Sam
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highdesert

I have to admit I find the lighted match near the mantel method the most enjoyable  (if not the most cost effective)

Shaun, ICCC #979
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James
Thought i remember reading someones lists of tools here and an model airplane fuel pump is what they used to pump fuel out with. Terry or Bobs list maybe?

Sounds like a good one to me!

AMEN!!!!
Jim
Me? I'm Nobody.
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adelcoro

I leave the cap off for a day or 2!
The worst tanks to empty are the 4m stoves. Nothing comes out of them if you try to empty it, there must a few chambers in those tank , for sure.

AMEN!!!

ICCC 957
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Christopher_OR

This was an issue for me going to the convention, where ALL appliances had to be emptied of fuel per fire regulations. Stoves were easy. Pumped up the tank and set it on the ground level with the generator pointed into an empty fuel can turned on its side. Opened the valve. Raw fuel came out a lot faster than it would on a heated, running stove. Ten minutes tops, and I worked on the lanterns meanwhile.

For my lanterns, I fashioned two jigs; one for lanterns with a built-in pump, and one for Quick Lites with an external pump. The first has been described already: copper tube, rubber cork-shaped plug, vinyl tubing put together to be used through the filler while operating the pump by hand to build pressure and expel the fuel into a storage can.



For Quick Lites, it's a bit more involved. I remove the generator and install the jig in its place. Jig itself made from an old Q77 with the packing removed, and bent to clear the burner. Tighten it in place, and use the external pump to get it done.

For long-term storage, yes, leave the fount open for a few days to evaporate what remains.

Christopher OR 

1970 – 2017 R.I.P.
This member has passed.

His Favorite Quotes:

"Life is about turning the things you want to do into things you've done." --KRD

"I don't give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way." --Samuel Clemens

"Everyone looks good in the fish eye lens that is the side of a Coleman fount." --raly13

ICCC #947
Coleman Blues #041
A turd is something you flush.
-----------------------------
76501 00037
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swimmy83843
I've got a couple of the old cylindrical stove tanks plus an HGP. Cannot romp out any of them. I bought one of the Siphon transfer things from wally's plus the cheapest fuel filter they had. Then I stuck a short length of copper tubing in one end. Probably paid more than I should have but did not like the idea of taking apart the tanks or sucking gas.
Craig

Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate. Member #0101
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dbosch
Chris-
I have made the same thing that you have shown except I have added a small, cheap Fram fuel filter to the end of it.  It's a good way to defuel fresh acquisitions and separate the crap from the fuel.

Dan B.  ICCC #100
The Texas Dust Bowl

Faith is not about everything turning out okay; faith is about being okay no matter how things turn out.
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mahobud

Coleman marketed a Stove Tank Cleaning Tube (#599-910) for gallon stove tanks.  It was a curved tube with a cork--simple to make. After seeing Dan's version of the 199-910 fount cleaning tube, I went to the hardware store and bought a few corks and 3 pieces of 12 inch aluminum "hobby craft" tubing. Made several fount and stove tank emptying tubes.  And, they work! I  pump fuel back into a fuel can through a Coleman filtering funnel. (Pumping into a clear jar is an excellent idea--even your best lantern might have crud in the tank).

Bud
ICCC #15C
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mowerdave694
I generally just take the fount cap off and light a match to see if there is any fuel left.  Funny I havent gotten past this step for some reason.  Oh anyone have a extra set of eyebrows for sale.

Dave

Ebay handle mowerdave402
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Nevada_Ed
Going to have to make myself one of those too. I have taken to drying founts out putting a little ATF fluid in them, open the valve and leave the cap on loose. As long as the fuel doesn't smell bad I filter it with a coffee filter and have a can I keep it in. The can is marked White Gasoline, but I put salvaged kerosene or Coleman fuel in it, so it is usually a mix. To be burned in one of my more hardy kerosene lanterns like the one shown, my Frankenlantern 237 eats it up real well too. Should mention only use the mix in lanterns that are safe to burn white gasoline. Used a regular camp fuel can that I treated with POR-15 and painted up red.  Ed



Ed

There are 10 kinds of people in this world, those who understand binary, and those who don't.

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cricket

l usually use wet and dry shop vacuum. After I pour Coleman fuel out,  whatever is left inside (in most cases few drops), I than use vacuum with modified thin flexible pipe I attached to the main hose with electrical tape. Works well for me.

Tim.
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warren
I use the DBosch setup now and it is great.  He even has one for items without an internal pump and it works.

You should check your shop vac directions about flamable liquid.  I'm not sure that is a good idea.  (Please check to be safe)

Warren

ANTIQUESWV on Ebay
#1 in the 223B club
Gatlinburg, TN

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