200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

nikdanger
Good morning Planet Coleman!
As I'm almost completely new to all things Coleman, what specific Coleman Lantern/Stove tools are reccomemded for (eventual) complete diassembly and re-assembly? 
Where would I source these tools, oldcolemanparts.com? 
Nik
I love Jesus --> I fall down, get up, walk some, fall down get up, walk some, hopefully to fall less,walk more.
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Dubblbubbl

The one tool that comes to mind is the check valve tool from OCP.  Other folks on here have made their own but this uni-tasker is perfect for cv removal.  You may not ever need it but as you start collecting more pieces you may run into a stuck check valve that needs to be extracted.  Most check valves can be freed up with common soaking/flushing techniques, but I’ve had a couple that need a more thorough cleaning.  It took me a few years before I really needed it.  You may need additional tools from other sources if you work on some foreign appliances and maybe some of the old Coleman gear.

Another tool will be a thin 9/16 flat open end wrench bent at a slight angle like this.  This is to get to the frame nut on the 220/228 lanterns.  You can get one from OCP or you can make your own like I did.


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Rob in NC
MilSpecOps Syndicate #1962
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1962

Sometimes we are the windshield, Sometimes we are the bug...
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Hot Diggity
There's a difference between Coleman lantern and stove tools and tools I use during the repair of Coleman lanterns and stoves.  The Coleman tools are collectible, utilitarian, barely adequate stamped wrenches that came with the original equipment.  These and lots of pliers and adjustable wrenches made the scars you see on valves and fittings.

Good quality, correctly fitted wrenches with the widest possible grip on the fittings is what I prefer for repairs.  A large wood clamp, some leather, a  couple hose clamps and a little bottle of pine tar help hold round parts without marring them.  There are tutorials here on how to remove stuck tubes with my technique, and how to modify a T55 Torx bit to remove burner caps.  I like to keep a spare drill chuck around for holding things.  The only other tool that I really appreciate, mostly because my fingers aren't so nimble anymore is a carburetor clip tool from Lisle.  This thing is sweet!  I can hold the end of a generator, keeping everything under control and slide it right into the eccentric block without fumbling around, cursing, or damaging installed mantles.

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Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
Milspec Syndicate #510
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0510
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #12
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #510
Coleman Slant Saver #510
Frank Appreciation Syndicate Member #2
Tinker, Toy maker, Trash picker, Wickie, Lamp loon
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Gunhippie
That's a great idea, Chuck!

A set of ASE end wrenches from 5/16" to 5/8" will cover almost everything you encounter. A bent and thinned 9/16" for the frame nut of a 220/228 is essential and a similar bent and thinned 7/16" wrench will access the same on some of the older lanterns.

A T55 Torx wrench with the rounded tip cut off will remove stubborn burner caps:

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And the CV tool is essential for leaky CVs:

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That CV on the end of the tool has one side broken completely off:

[30929159047_9ebc28f516_b]

from a POs attempt to remove it with the wrong tools. The CV tool had no difficulty with it at all.

A propane or MAPP plumber's torch will come in handy for a lot of things, from breaking stuck nuts, bolts and screws loose (with penetrating oil) to getting stuck generators guts out (Hold the tip of the gen with pliers, heat to a dull red and immediately drop in water. Repeat until the guts fall out.) to removing the gasket on the insert of a three-piece fuel cap (put the insert on a flame-proof surface and burn that rock-hard gasket out). You might even find yourself using it for some soldering/light brazing. Also very handy for an instant-start of a suitcase stove by pre-heating the gen tube for about 30 seconds.

For more precision work, a small butane-powered torch comes in handy too, and is perfect for pre-heating a lantern gen.

A bench vice, 12" Crescent wrench and rubber strap wrench (oil filter wrench) come in real handy for taking valves out of founts. I had to steal my strap wrench from my Coleman box yesterday to break actually use on an oil filter!

An adult beverage or two will greatly help when cleaning frames and doing other tedious chores.

I should note that I'm a tool guy, so will use any excuse to buy a new tool.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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holliswood
The most common tools I use frequently:
The check valve tool
Rubber strap wrenches
Propane Torch
Regular and Line Wrenches 
Assorted Picks
Full range of slot screwdrivers 
Gun cleaning kit
Adjustable Wrenches in different sizes 
Pipe Cleaners
Vise
Steel Wool
Pen Magnet
Steel BB’s 
Buckets of different sizes
Toothbrushes
Brass and Steel brushes
Magnetic Trays (A must have!!!!!)
Metal Loaf pans
Fire extinguishers 
Safety goggles
rubber gloves
paper towels
razor blades
hobby knife
and others I can’t remember at the moment 😆
-Fred

ICCC Member #1871
MilSpec-Ops #1278
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #41
Perfection Heater Collectors #2 
CANADIAN BLUES SYNDICATE #57
Coleman Slant Saver #65

snipesfred on Insta
Big Ferd on YT
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Gunhippie
Yeah, forgot the gun kit w/.17 and .22 brass brushes for cleaning gen tubes.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Phredd
how does the torx55 get off a burner cap?

Phredd
ICCC#1799
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #40
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Gunhippie
Most double-mantle burner caps have a star-shaped opening. The T55 fits that well enough to unscrew it without trashing anything with pliers. If, for some reason, you absolutely need to remove a burner cap. I rarely do, but made this tool while working on a lantern with missing screens.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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BSAGuy
Elbow grease and nitrile gloves to reduce contact of various noxious chemicals with your skin. 
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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Phredd
Thanks Timm. I learn something new all the time on this forum!

Phredd
ICCC#1799
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #40
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outlawmws
Adding on:
  • A self igniting torch with a MAPP gas tank is also useful for quick preheats, and burning the tar out of old generators
  • a smaller one for soldering jobs - I just bought a replacement and got a nice one for "kitchen" use (Brule anyone?)
  • Nail clippers for trimming mantle strings
  • Small ball peen and plastic face hammers. (think dents)
  • Ultrasonic cleaner
  • Electrolysis tank/setup
  • 1/8 and 1/4" brass pipe plugs
  • 1/8 NPT schrader valve (you may want one of these in a  one piece cap)
  • Pressure gauge  (0-30 is enough)
  • Probe/hook for clearing air tubes (I use cut down SS ribs from windshield wipers
  • Calipers are often handy
  • Dental picks
  • various punches (center and drift) and a small chisel
  • Hole punches for leather/Gaskets
  • different pliers - Needle nose, plastic padded slip joints, small vise grips (needle nose are probably the most useful)

Lets not forget needed chemicals:
  • Neatsfoot oil (pump leathers)
  • Ballistol is well thought of by those that know about it (the Germans use it for most anything - been around for about 100 years...)
  • 91% Isopropyl alcohol, and/or DNA
  • Kroil is my favorite penetrating oil
  • BreakFree CLP is another good option
  • A bottle of lighter fluid is handy, (you can refill some with CF)
  • Evaporust
  • Citric acid
  • White vinegar
  • Thread sealant

Common Spare parts:
  • Mantles (different sizes if you have broad lantern tastes)
  • Pump leathers (May need different sizes here also)
  • Cap Gaskets (at least two sizes)
  • Spare fuel cap (possibly 2 sizes)
  • Globes?  Could be optional 
  • burner caps
  • .005 mandolin string wire (pricker wire - but this could be in "tools' as well)
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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outlawmws
I forgot tool/part boxes  (I need to organize the parts..) The wood (Mable) block at the bottom is for holding caps and inserts -  ALL of this fits in the aluminum box:

Colman boxes.jpg 
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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holliswood
Hi-Temp grease for those o-rings that go on the valve shaft - 621’s etc. 
-Fred

ICCC Member #1871
MilSpec-Ops #1278
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #41
Perfection Heater Collectors #2 
CANADIAN BLUES SYNDICATE #57
Coleman Slant Saver #65

snipesfred on Insta
Big Ferd on YT
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Tigerfans2
sometimes the T55 (Dean's idea 1st I believe) takes the burner cap off, sometimes the tube unscrews.  Either way bugs Do on occasion get in there.
Coleman Slant Saver #58
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #8
Coleman Blues 243's #16
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Gunhippie
Never forget a large pair of Channel Lock or Vice Grip pliers for stubborn parts!

Just kidding! Put that pitchfork down, please!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
outlawmws
Gunhippie wrote:
Never forget a large pair of Channel Lock or Vice Grip pliers for stubborn parts!

Just kidding! Put that pitchfork down, please!


Dang!  I missed those in my GPA toolkit!  Thanks Timm!
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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deepmarsh
@Hot Diggity pardon my ignorance, but what do you use pine tar for with lanterns? 
Tbm
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Dubblbubbl
deepmarsh wrote:
@Hot Diggity pardon my ignorance, but what do you use pine tar for with lanterns? 


I’m going to jump in on this one.  I use a piece of leather belt to wrap stubborn parts while using channel locks.  The leather saves the metal from severe marring.  On some pieces the leather will slip unless I really bear down on the grips.  I can see applying pine tar would help immensely for these situations.
Rob in NC
MilSpecOps Syndicate #1962
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1962

Sometimes we are the windshield, Sometimes we are the bug...
Quote
Tigerfans2
The pine tar is used to refinish your Finnish (no pun intended) M39 stock whilst waiting for your Evapo-rust or citric to work on your lantern parts.
Coleman Slant Saver #58
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #8
Coleman Blues 243's #16
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outlawmws
Gunhippie wrote:
Never forget a large pair of Channel Lock or Vice Grip pliers for stubborn parts!

Just kidding! Put that pitchfork down, please!


So Timm,  you meant something like these for the delicate work,  right?

Channellocks.jpg 
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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