200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

jmj5407otx
Hello everyone, I I have a little hack for removing a 220E-220F phillips burner tube assembly screw, I needed to take more than a few burner assembly's off to clean them, but the phillips   screw is impossible to get a good bite on because of the angle of the screwdriver . 

This trick will make the original screw modified to remove  extremely easy, you can easily get replacements at Old Colman parts or a hardware store.  I take a dremel and double up two cutoff wheels together, cut a good slot cut for a staight blade screwdriver, just cut evenly with the cross of the phillips head, then take a staight blade screwdriver, give it a quick snap and the screw is loose.

I figured this out tonight trying everything to get that screw loose on 3 220's, tried this on the first, it worked so well I did the other two without removing the cage.  I remembered how easy it was doing my 220D with the straight slot screw. you will definitely want to replace the screw afterwards, they  are very inexpensive ( I buy plenty to have on hand ), but it sure saves a ton of time removing the burner assembly without removing the cage.  I hope this helps someone out.  Jay

[KI4SJls]  [sUjt1Pc]  [3n1WCDu]  [llJrdQE]  [xvjRLhd]  [7Q5GJuO]  [n3bAWax]  [cI93vPL] 
1947 220D, 1948 228D, 1947 242C, 1962 220E, 1966 220F ,1966 228F 1966 502 stove, 1973 220H, 1990 222, 1989 288 1967 200A
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zoomkat
Interesting approach. I used another trick somebody used somewhere. Take a Philips  screw drive head, the type one sticks into a magnetic drill bit holder, put something against the rear end to hold the bit in the screw head, then turn the bit with a small wrench. Been a while, but the lip on the side of the frame was used as a hard spot to apply pressure to the screw bit to keep it from slipping out. I later got the below right angle screw driver, but have not tried it yet. The distance from the bit tip to the flat back of the ratchet knob is ~1.5". 

https://www.harborfreight.com/8-piece-right-angle-screwdriver-92630.html
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jmj5407otx
zoomkat wrote:
Interesting approach. I used another trick somebody used somewhere. Take a Philips  screw drive head, the type one sticks into a magnetic drill bit holder, put something against the rear end to hold the bit in the screw head, then turn the bit with a small wrench. Been a while, but the lip on the side of the frame was used as a hard spot to apply pressure to the screw bit to keep it from slipping out. I later got the below right angle screw driver, but have not tried it yet. The distance from the bit tip to the flat back of the ratchet knob is ~1.5". 

  I tried my right angle screwdriver set, my screws wouldn't budge, kept walking out even with pressure against the driver , ( I have about every tool known to modern man..lol, I used to work on Top Fuel dragster/ A fuel/ top alcohol teams  teams and raced / restored my own cars), we had to develop solutions for quick turn around rebuilds , if we had a problem part , I usually could figure something off the wall to work.  Heat usually works well with dissimilar metals ( stainless and brass) , these were giving me problems.....so out came the dremel.   Jay
1947 220D, 1948 228D, 1947 242C, 1962 220E, 1966 220F ,1966 228F 1966 502 stove, 1973 220H, 1990 222, 1989 288 1967 200A
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zoomkat
If the threads get rounded out, then the dermal is about the only out (but the head could be weakened). I was lucky in that the screw broke lose and came out. The backing out issue is a challenge. A small C clamp might be used to limit the back out, but fitting it would/might be an issue to the screw being lower than the outside frame flange. If one has wide jawed tools, like channel locks, adjustable wrenches, C clamp vice grips, and similar, then these might be used to hold the bit in the screw slots and prevent it from walking out while being turned to break it lose. Just depends on what one has in the "kitchen drawer" to work with.  
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Tgarner01
If I have even a little trouble removing that screw I just remove eccentric block with the air tube as you would a 220/228B.
Toby Garner
ICCC #1939
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Smudge
I've used that method for removing a screw for an vacuum cleaner motor housing. The heat generated by the friction from the cutting disc also helps to remove the screw.
"If all the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit, for whatever happens to the beasts,
also happens to the man. Whatever befalls the Earth, befalls the sons of the Earth.” - Chief Seattle

ICCC # 1726  -  Bernz0matiC Appreciation Club #057
Perfection Heater Collectors #6
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Bob1774
Always good to have several ways to solve a problem!  I heated up an inexpensive Phillips head screwdriver and gave it a bit of an angle to reach that screw.  Usually hit it with a little PB Blaster, and they come free.
Bob
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mnhogrider
Why do you take the screw out? I’ve never had to.
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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jmj5407otx
mnhogrider wrote:
Why do you take the screw out? I’ve never had to.


I had to take the whole burner assembly off of one 220F that was pretty dirty to soak and polish , I made a socket to remove the eccentric block, the socket will not fit unless the burner air tube is removed.  I grew tired of messing around trying to get a Phillips to bite, all of the three I did last night were really tight.  I am a 57 year T-7 para in  a chair, going back and forth between the house and shop isn't fun in the rain, so the dremel came out.
1947 220D, 1948 228D, 1947 242C, 1962 220E, 1966 220F ,1966 228F 1966 502 stove, 1973 220H, 1990 222, 1989 288 1967 200A
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