200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Dubblbubbl

I’m in the middle of that 4-63 220e fettle and I decide to try citric acid on the frame.  After reading a ton of threads on how to use it and what to use it on and how long to soak.  I made a solution of 2 gallons of hot water with 4tbls of citric acid and soaked the frame about 20 min, then steel wooled it with Mother’s mag polish.  Turned out amazing, then I decided to do the whole burner assembly.  Let this soak about 15 min until the brass was showing some pink and hit it with Mother’s and 0000 steel wool.  Again, the results amazed me.  This was way better than evaporust and carb cleaner soaks I’ve used in the past.  Today I was stripping the fount for a repaint and thought what the heck, pulled the valve out and soaked the fount.  I had already tried an application of stripeze but most of the paint didn’t budge.  Let it soak for about 30 min and the paint came off easy with a brass brush.  Had to resoak for another 15-20 minutes to get some of the stubborn paint on the bottom to release.

I was afraid to soak the valve in the citric because of the packing, but I did soak the filler cap, with the gasket, go figure.  Didn’t seem to hurt the gasket.  So, will citric acid harm the graphite?  


The next experiment will be on that recent 530 that I picked up a couple of weeks ago.  Was thinking of a short dip of the closed fount with the sw/mother’s treatment.  I tried to take the frame off but the screws were so rusted it was clear they weren’t going to survive extraction so I stopped and just cleaned up what I could reach.

Rob in NC
MilSpecOps Syndicate #1962
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1962

Sometimes we are the windshield, Sometimes we are the bug...
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Chucker
Not sure about graphite and citric. I usually just use citric solution and fine steel wool to clean the valve up with scrubbing and maybe a small wire brush like tooth brush sized.

When removing those screws from the 530 frame - I used brief hits with a propane torch. Got 'em. Some are just easier than others. You might use stainless or chrome plated brass screws during reassembly. 

Yup, broke at least one of those screws off before I tried heat. Drill and tap will fix it but gotta be careful on your depth or you'll drill right down into the tank. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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JimL
I can't imagine the citric affecting the packing.   One piece of advice is to know that with few exceptions,  citric will strip nickel.   This happened to me with the nickel plated air tube on a 200A.   Just something to keep in mind.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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Dubblbubbl

I made up a couple gallons of citric this morning and dunked the 530 after checking the nickel closely for any signs of previous plating loss.  Did a 5 minute soak and steel wooled it.  This cleaned up real nice.  I removed the pump and filler cap and just submerged the entire stove.  There was some rust color to the cf that I dumped out so I figured the inside of the fount could use a little acid.  Rinsed and dried it all off, and disassembled the valve wheel, pricker lever and burner and shined them up a bit.  Then flushed the fount with some cf and lit it up.  Runs like a 530 should, nice fireworks until the vaporizer heats up, then the roar, glad my wife wasn’t looking as I lit it up on the covered patio.  Here are the before and after pics.  I did not clean the pump yet so that’s why it’s showing some grunge.



 

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Rob in NC
MilSpecOps Syndicate #1962
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1962

Sometimes we are the windshield, Sometimes we are the bug...
Quote
Majicwrench
I gotta try citric. 

Those screws on the 530, do they really need to come out??
Keith
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Chucker
You go Rob!

Lookin' good. Sometimes it takes a risk taker to lead the way. Plenty of risk takers on this forum, ha. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Dubblbubbl
Majicwrench wrote:
I gotta try citric. 

Those screws on the 530, do they really need to come out??


in this case ‘no’.  The citric bath did clean them up, so at least I could get a good purchase if i need to pull the valve in the future. Nice thing about these is you can take the entire top end apart with the frame in place.
Rob in NC
MilSpecOps Syndicate #1962
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1962

Sometimes we are the windshield, Sometimes we are the bug...
Quote
MotorcycleDan
I pull the fuel valve out of the body and give it a Citric bath. It has not hurt the valve packing yet. I have lost count on how many I have done this way. 
Dan ICCC #900
ICCC Treasure
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TwoCanoes
I pull the fuel valve out of the body and give it a Citric bath. It has not hurt the valve packing yet. I have lost count on how many I have done this way. 
  I've started doing this, too.  No harm to the packing.  I leave the valve in the acid bath for about 15 minutes, then rinse it in water, then rinse in denatured alcohol to clear the water out and finally blow it out with air.  Like Dubblbubble above, I was having trouble stripping the paint from a couple of founts.  I was using KwikStrip from a pump bottle.  (I had used KwikStrip from an aerosol can on other founts with excellent results.)  So I decided to try boiling in citric acid to remove the paint.  I used one generous tablespoon per gallon, immersed the fount in the acid and brought it to a boil.  As soon as it boiled, I shut off the flame and let the acid bath cool until I could remove the fount with my bare hand.  This did a pretty good job on the paint, but there were still patches of paint left which came off fairly easily with a wire brush.  However, the treatment left a pretty persistent, splotchy black residue on the fount.  The residue wouldn't come off with alcohol or gas.  I could reduce the residue with steel wool, but still didn't get the shiny metal I was expecting.  I decided if it was that persistent, it would be fine to paint over it, so that's what I finally did.  I had seen reference to this black residue somewhere else on the Forum, but I couldn't find it.  As much as I like citric acid, though, I still use Evaporust for the really tough jobs.
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