200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

72merc
Hello.  How critical is it that a check valve seal the fount completely when the stem is unscrewed?  There have been a few lanterns I have worked on where the check valve never really stops air from escaping the fount unless the stem is screwed all the way in.  I am checking this by pumping up the fount, closing the stem, starting the lantern, unscrewing the stem and then holding my thumb over the hole to see if it rises.  I have a removal tool and have removed them, soaked them in vinegar, cleaned with carb cleaner, swapping from one lantern to another, etc. and nothing I have done ever seems to get them to seal completely on their own without the stem being screwed closed.  I have read on here that a pump rising less than an inch per second is acceptable, but the rate the pump rises seems to be dependent on the amount of pressure I apply with my thumb.  Is there something I am missing?  Or do I need to be concerned about pumping one of these lanterns when it is already lit?  Thanks in advance for any help or advice.
72merc
Quote
Majicwrench
Check valve seldom makes a perfect seal, and is not designed to. That's why you have the air stem.  Tighten air stem after pumping, enjoy light!

Pumping lantern while it is running is fine.  But after a good bunch of pumps 30-40 it should run for a good hour or two? before you have to. If it does not run long without pumping, have you changed the cap gasket?
Keith
Quote
Smudge
I've seen in a video, where someone suggested that you need to hold your thumb over the pump opening, while tightening the stem valve. That's simply not true. As Keith mentioned, the amount of air escaping from the check valve, while pumping, is negligible.
"If all the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit, for whatever happens to the beasts,
also happens to the man. Whatever befalls the Earth, befalls the sons of the Earth.” - Chief Seattle

ICCC # 1726  -  Bernz0matiC Appreciation Club #057
Perfection Heater Collectors #6
Quote
Gunhippie
A bad CV is one that prevents you from getting any pressure into the fount.

Most leak some, but not enough to bother me. My L427s have CVs that, even after cleaning, barely hold pressure enough to allow me to pump 'em up. Combined with a pump know with no air hole, it can be a PITA.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
Quote
curlyjoe_99
Smudge wrote:
I've seen in a video, where someone suggested that you need to hold your thumb over the pump opening, while tightening the stem valve. That's simply not true. As Keith mentioned, the amount of air escaping from the check valve, while pumping, is negligible.


I have a couple of CV's that I have to do that thumb hold on. they work fine otherwise.

the  recourse, if you are not willing to accept or the air escapes to fast to keep the fount pressurized, I have found is to :
I use a fuel cap that has a schrader valve and put 30 PSI into the fount. then quickly open the pump 3-5 turns and you will hear air escaping and the ball eventually makes a ttssssbbbttt! sound as it seals. if this works, at least the seal and ball are good. sometimes this will solve the issue with a drop of machine oil on the ball as well.

Other times I have had to pull the CV and either replace with newer or scrub/polish the CV-Ball then press down a bit on the three tabs that hold the ball in place. My theory is that this brings the CV-Ball closer to the seal point and it takes less air pressure to make it seal.

hope this makes sense and helps
Robert (AKA Curly)-- Heart-of-Texas! "Keep 'Em Working"  
MILSPEC_OPS & 275 Appreciation Syndicate Member #9999

In Search of (ISO): evidence of a 220/228 series lantern dated 2/63    

Quote
Tigerfans2
I'm not going to respond to this thread.
Coleman Slant Saver #58
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #8
Coleman Blues 243's #16
Quote
Cottage_hill_bill
Seems you already did. [smile]
Reese
North West Florida

Reese’s Law of Thermodynamics:  At temperatures below incandescence hot metal looks exactly like cold metal.

Quote
Tigerfans2
but I was nice
Coleman Slant Saver #58
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #8
Coleman Blues 243's #16
Quote
72merc
Thank you to all for the help, I appreciate it.
72merc
Quote


...
...
Welcome to the Coleman Collectors Forum, an international forum of Coleman enthusiast and collectors, as such people from all over the world come here to read about Coleman collecting, repair, and to meet and make friends. The pages contained here are intended for the use of amateur collectors and people interested in Coleman collecting, restoration and repair as a hobby. It goes without saying to refrain from political posts, personal attacks and inflammatory posts.

Please note, all postings are the personal opinions of the members posting, the owner, administrators and moderators of the forum do not warrant the accuracy of posted information or endorse the safety of such.