200A and 202 reproduction
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jWoodyNE
Just got back from camping at Blue River Lodge in Crete, NE - My fifth camp of the year. Experienced some light rain both days, but it didn't interfere with meal prep, which featured my first ever white bread Dutch oven bake in the field. It was kinda plain but tasted good, and was a proof-of-concept that gives me new opportunities for future camping menus.  My 2-burner Coleman stove got dinner and 2 breakfasts done, and my Coleman 5151 provided camp light well enough but I'm really looking forward to getting my 200A into service.

I have a buddy who lives out there and he let me pitch the lean-to in his back yard. The area sports a lodge in a 100 year old barn with 2 chandeliers, huge dance floor, a stage, and bar. There were maybe 100 people there at midnight listening to a pretty rocking band, in the middle of nowhere. Downside was the bugs. Tons of them, but my mosquito screen, head netting, and OFF Deep Woods kept me mostly uneaten.

This will be the place I will practice winter camping later this year.
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First time deploying the jumbo mosquito netting. It attached to my ridgeline and tucks under my sleeping mat. It worked great!

profile.jpgLake was about 50 feet away. The Burr Oak in the photo had a 3 feet diameter. The trees out there are massive.

bread.jpg 
Basic white bread in a Dutch oven. Mixed flour, yeast, salt, sugar into a sandwich bag at home. Added water Friday night after setting camp and let it rise overnight. Then Saturday morning I placed the dough into a greased 8 inch oven and gave it 2 more hours for a second rise, then about 30 min in a 450 degree briquette oven. It probably could have browned more on top. Lesson learned for next attempt.

camp_kitchen.jpg Camp kitchen. I'm loving the Coleman stove. It makes coffee and breakfast so much more accessible and saves us from using charcoal just to warm up sides. A full tank of white gasoline easily lasts the weekend under my usage, eliminating the need for carrying extra fuel. I did have enough charcoal to accomplish all cooking in the event the stove failed for any reason.

rain_mode.jpg Lowered the awning to shed rain. Everything stayed dry. There was enough room under the awning for my buddy and I both on camp chairs, we moved the firepit over there and watched the fire and listened to the rain falling on my shelter after it got dark.

lodge.jpg The Lodge. Most people were in the bar/seating area off camera, or outside under covered patios. You can hear the music just fine from quite far away. I nerded out on the building's 100 year old construction. The roof trusses were incredible.
 "qui tacet consentire videtur" - He who is silent, when he ought to have spoken and was able to, is taken to agree.
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GCinSC
Ok I’m impressed. Camping, Coleman’s, fire cooking and DO bread. 

If if we were in the same park I’d come over and see what’s cooking. 

I tell folks if you if you see a DO in camp go say hi but if you see DO’s stacked and cooking go back to your camp and find some trading sharing stuff and then say hi. 

Good stuff. 

Gary
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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PetroMax
Great camp.  I like how you are not being a purist and employing gear and techniques from car camping , bush craft , classic camping . 
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BSAGuy
Looks and sounds like a good weekend.  I always wonder why God created mosquitos.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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fuel brained
With that meal I would have brought some cornbread or corn cakes
Pastor Jeff
God said "Let there be light" so He let His Son shine.
SoCal and Lovin' It
US Navy Submarine Cold War Veteran
MilSpec Ops #1960 "Feel the Roar"
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Nuiman
Nicely rigged setup !  (and the chow looks good too !)
[image]
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jWoodyNE

Thanks for all the responses!

Gary, I've only ever seen DO's in the wild at the Midwest Dutch Oven Dabbler meet-up I attend twice a year, but I love your idea if I ever spot someone using stacked ovens. I'll keep that in mind!

@fuel brained , my wife usually does cornbread in a DO on our camps, but I was running solo this time and tried something new.  I'm hoping to pick up a Coleman oven while I'm on vacation, so that would open up more cornbread options for me.

@PetroMax , thanks for the compliment.  I really just love being outside in the field and learning to be comfortable out there.  I recently purchased a magnesium bar to get experience starting fires in a more bushcrafty way, which I'm looking forward to learning 

Courtenay, I hear you.  There's actually a bit of serious debate in the Science World regarding the ethics of using gene technology to try and eradicate the species.

@Nuiman , I am pretty proud of my Whelen Lean-to 🙂  I made it earlier this year and this was the third time I've had it out.  I throw it on a 1/8 Amsteel ridgeline, which is strong enough, and tight enough with my versa tackle knot rigging, to allow me to throw a 10x20 or a 9x12 "front porch" off the front of the structure if I wanted.

 "qui tacet consentire videtur" - He who is silent, when he ought to have spoken and was able to, is taken to agree.
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GCinSC
jWoodyNE,

I dabble in DO cooking, beef roasts, chili, stew, big egg scramble not sure of its name, basic baking but later this year it'll be $100 in the big DO. The plan a special celebration meal at a state park with some darn good buddies and spouses but the meal loaded baked potatoes, salad and sit down Prime Rib for 6. Never done it but I'm committed.

We I guess are of the age where Glamping might fit the title but we cook almost nothing in the Airstream. Coleman stove is the morning coffee but open fire and cast iron is a standard. And when the menu requires it, out comes the cardboard box oven. I've cooked a pizza in the big one a 20" Lodge Cast Iron pan filled with a thick crust pizza. It disappeared.

Don't get me started on the coffee pot choice, includes perc, cowboy and drip-o-lators and a vacuum pot for the late 30's 
the cowboy is the group camp king 11 qt. 

Gary
Gary, self acclaimed Cast Iron Camp Cook & Tinkerer.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0154
Mil-SpecOps #0308
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bandaide
I love a good camping LL/AAR. Sharing tips and including recipes is a nice touch! I read your earlier topic on building the tent that was pretty cool. Do you have a method for setting it up when you don't have anything around to tie to? Sometimes when on the great plains or in the desert camping there is nothing for miles.
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jWoodyNE
@bandaide , thanks 🙂  I almost always do an AAR with my wife, especially if I'm solo camping.  I find it really helps me not miss learning opportunities.

 I don't have the best photo demonstrating it, but I can pitch it without trees using just two poles if I don't use a ridgeline.

Untitled.png 

In that case I will use two "detachable becketts" (the wooden ball and noose that I describe in that other post), on each end of the peak of the shelter.  I can then hang the structure however high my poles will go, which will apply both upward and outward tension to the structure.  If one weren't sleeping in a cot, they could probably do this with trecking poles, YMMV.
 "qui tacet consentire videtur" - He who is silent, when he ought to have spoken and was able to, is taken to agree.
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Roger Miller
jWoodyNE, shoot me a PM if your interested, I am part of a group of like minded people who also do a lot of campouts. We even have a yearly winter camp in January. We camp just south of Hastings, Ne. Last year I did a demo on Coleman lanterns and stoves, because everybody should have more than just one.
There was between 25 to 30 of us and I even won the cast iron cook off with my version of cowboy beans.

Shoot me a PM if you interested in more details
He said " I only just want one lantern that works"
"Holyrood" 2018 Survivor
I got rained on at the, Coleman Collectors Club Central Kansas 3rd Annual Gathering 2018 @ Wilson Lake.
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bandaide
@jWoodyNE You think trekking poles would be usable with an ultralight cot like the ones thermarest make? They are really low, like 6 or 8 inches off the ground, and could probably fit that in under some trekking poles. Mine go from 26" to 55" at the stops.

I also like how you used mosquito netting. Not enough people do. It's not that mosquito bites bother me.  They can be handled by using a head net and a mummy bag in the southern states.  A little bit north though, its the damn bot fly larva and what that does that comes with them that I don't like.
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jWoodyNE
bandaide wrote:
 You think trekking poles would be usable with an ultralight cot like the ones thermarest make?


I think you probably could, @bandaide .  If you sleep sideways to the front the way I do, with a 4 ft peak the math says you'd get 7 ft of fore-to-aft space. You'd have maybe 2 feet of "unsleepable" space past your cot towards the aft of the structure (which I use for gear stowage in addition to under the wings). Then with a 2 ft wide cot, you'd still have 3 feet of margin under the main roof of the shelter, and that's not including the 1.5 ft awning.  With a 3 ft peak, you'd get 7.4 ft of fore-to-aft space.  With the peak this low, you almost start getting the ability to sleep fore-and-aft instead of amidships, which would allow two ppl to sleep under the shelter.  That would be cool!

You could test this with just a simple tape measure.  Run it out 8 ft and fix the end to ground.  Then put the other end at whatever testing height you want. Then see how far back you could move and still have sufficient ceiling clearance.  If you do it with a Whelen I'd love to see the photos 🙂 

Instructions: https://www.backpacking.net/makegear/huntersleanto/
 "qui tacet consentire videtur" - He who is silent, when he ought to have spoken and was able to, is taken to agree.
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