200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

mnhogrider

I bought a bottle at Wally and tried it yesterday. Smells different and does absolutely nothing.

Research shows that they quit making the 20% Hydrochloric acid mix and have backed it down to 9.5% by regulation. Doesn’t even make a dent now.

It was great for pre cleaning rusty parts before a citric acid bath. Some parts would clean up so good that they didn’t need the citric acid. 

Guess I’m going to have to scour all the local Hardware stores to see if I can find the old formula. Wished I would have known or I would have stocked up on a few bottles.

Anybody know of any alternative brands or any other type of cleaner that’ll do a good job on rust?

Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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austin65uri
I use Lysol Advanced with 12% HCL.  Works like you described with your 20% product.
Bill.
ICCC#1601
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bowenstudios
This must be why the works has never impressed me, its probably always been the weaker concentration.

If you are wanting the hydrochloric acid to derust, why not just use muratic acid? It appears that there is no standard percentage, I saw products from 14% to nearly 40% so be careful.

I have great luck using hot vinegar, and it's only 5% acetic acid, I imagine stronger acids would be much faster, just make sure to neutralize it.
-Mike
______________________________________

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #651
Mil-SpecOps #0651
The Coleman Blue's 243's #154
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mnhogrider
Might have to go with muriatic acid but I don’t want to eat up the plumbing where I do my cleaning in the basement slop sink.
I do give all my parts a baking soda soak after any acid derusting.
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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Hot Diggity
I only use this for toilets and to remove lettering from globes.  Appears to be different ingredients, but it does the job on nasty rental home toilets.
Lime-A-Way Thick Gel Formula Toilet Bowl Cleaner
Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
Milspec Syndicate #510
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0510
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #12
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #510
Coleman Slant Saver #510
Frank Appreciation Syndicate Member #2
Tinker, Toy maker, Trash picker, Wickie, Lamp loon
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Rubing
I strictly use citric acid. 
ICCC # 1402
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JimL
I've been using heated citric acid myself, but the next time, I will try oxalic acid (Barkeeper's Friend) since they now advertise on the container that it removes rust.  I have a copper bracelet that tarnishes quickly.  Just dropping it into a container with a little of this stuff cleans it up literally in seconds.

While other more powerful acids may work fine, I've no desire to deal with chemicals requiring PPE because they burn skin on contact.  If you go that route, just know how to dilute.    Most don't mention it because they use it often and think it's common knowledge, but I think you need to add the acid to water and not the other way around or it could have a bad reaction.  Just make certain you know first.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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Bob1774
AAA...Always Add Acid.  Sort of like lefty loosey, righty tighty, if you need to be reminded occasionally.

I've found the citric acid works pretty well for GPA cleanups and stay away from the extreme acids, as their infusion will keep working irreversibly for a long time after you thought it was rinsed out.
Bob
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rob_pontius
I've used the lime away gel with good results in the past. The works was always my go to for cleaning scum off of outboard lower units. It's been a while since I've used either. Now, I use citric acid or electrolysis. Make sure that if you buy the works, it doesn't say works basic on the label. That isn't nearly as strong as original works. I won't even use that in my toilet.
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bowenstudios
I also have stuck with the weaker acids  because they are safer to deal with, and generally cheaper. My wife laughs but I was cleaning parts for a willys jeep during the quarantine. Big canning pot and a bunch of vinegar on my roadtrip grill. Lighter rust, like we normally encounter onlanterns, just turned black and washed off with a bit of steel wool. Heavier I would chip at a bit ad put back in. Much easier on my back than standing at a sandblasting cabinet, plus I did other things while it soaked.

Of course there arent many before pictures but all these were just done with vinegar and were very rusty20200410_163801_copy_725x544.jpg 
These parts were some of the least rusty.
20200410_145744_copy_725x544.jpg 
And this is the navy vinegar pot, I just kept adding to it as it evaporated, even with the lid on. Found things didnt even need to be fully submerged. Now i want to order citric as i understand it works better.
20200420_124021_copy_725x544.jpg 
-Mike
______________________________________

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #651
Mil-SpecOps #0651
The Coleman Blue's 243's #154
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bowenstudios
I also read an article from Bob Villa that recommended 1:10 muratic to water to remove rust, then 1:1 baking soda and water to neutralize it. If I was worried about pipes I would dump a bunch of baking soda to neutralize it, of course that may make a volcano. So maybe slowly add.
-Mike
______________________________________

BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #651
Mil-SpecOps #0651
The Coleman Blue's 243's #154
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JimL
>>Now i want to order citric as i understand it works better.

I don't know that it works better, but you won't have the stench of vinegar.  I've found that for founts, heating citric to near boiling and adding to the fount will not only remove the rust, but also old fuel residue.

-Jim

Flammable liquids, open flame, what could go wrong?


I've missed you!  But I'm reloading.
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blacksmith
i was lucky to get 10 gallons of this years ago.... you can also use marine boat hull cleaner.... i use both for my boats and it bubbles the scum off the transom like nothing...
Gary r. voigt
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rob_pontius
Mike, you shouldn't need to order the citric acid. If your local grocery store carries canning supplies, they should have it there. Wally world in my area carries it. It's used in place of lemon juice for canning tomatoes.
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Rfieldbuilds
Hot Diggity wrote:
I only use this for toilets and to remove lettering from globes.  Appears to be different ingredients, but it does the job on nasty rental home toilets.
Lime-A-Way Thick Gel Formula Toilet Bowl Cleaner

whats your process with this lime a way version and globe lettering? 
Randy
QL #15, Slant Saver #59, #0269 Turd Hurdler, #0269 Mil Spec Syndicate, Coleman Blues 243 #0269, BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #072, and a few others too.
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mnhogrider
Buy citric acid on E bay. You can get a big bag of it for cheap.
Steve
ICCC Member #1396 
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #017
Mack, Cat and Cadillac.
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Gasman64
mnhogrider wrote:
Buy citric acid on E bay. You can get a big bag of it for cheap.

zzzzzzzzzz0o9zi9zi99z9z.png  That's what I do.  Got a bag several years ago and still have it; I have it stored in an airtight container, still good.
Steve
ICCC #1012
logoballistol logo 1a.png

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Chucker
I also read an article from Bob Villa that recommended 1:10 muratic to water to remove rust, then 1:1 baking soda and water to neutralize it. If I was worried about pipes I would dump a bunch of baking soda to neutralize it, of course that may make a volcano. So maybe slowly add.



This is probably the closest to replacing old Works of a few years ago which at times was 45% HCL. You could even go as high as 2 to 1, water to muriatic acid. LIKE OTHERS have said, this is very potent stuff and requires eye and hand protection, IMO. Yes, I do use this stuff but sparingly. 

Citric is my go to de-ruster since I don't have an electrolysis rig and we found it cheaper online than locally. 
Chuck
"...we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Romans 5:3-4
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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SteveRetherford
according to this the active ingredient in WORKS is hydrocloric acid
Link
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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Gunhippie
Hydrochloric acid produces some really nasty fumes. Use it outside or with very active ventilation--to/from the outside, not just moving the air around.

Store it outside, too. Any ferrous metal left within a few feet of a sealed bottle of muriatic (hydrochloric) acid will rust rapidly. In fact, I use it to make things rusty when I want to give steel or iron an aged look. Just spritz/brush on some dilute muriatic and let dry--it'll look like 50 years of rust in a few hours.

Here are some butt-weld steam fittings that were left in a box about two feet away from a sealed bottle of muriatic acid for a few months:

[45672140551_67a9d7d015_b]

And that stuff has an protective finish of asphaltum!

To dispose of any acid or alkali, DILUTE! Get that faucet running as fast as it will go with cold water before dumping the chems and after for a couple of minutes!

For rust removal, little beats phosphoric acid. It's so mild even 90% solutions will not burn skin on contact--still, rinse it off. It's safe enough that it's used as a food additive to make things sour (and it's why sodas will remove rust and tooth enamel). Best of all, if you're worried about flash rust, just let your 10% solution air-dry on the parts. It's a very effective rust preventative, too! You can paint directly over the dried phos finish.

And remember, Do what you oughter, add acid to water! This applies to other harsh chemicals like lye. Many concentrated chemicals produce a lot of heat when dissolved in water, so you want a large quantity of water to absorb the heat.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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n9zes
Gunhippie wrote:

For rust removal, little beats phosphoric acid.


+1!  I've used Krud Kutter "MUST FOR RUST" quite a bit and it works as advertised.  I used to order it from McMaster-Carr for work-related use because it was convenient and next day delivery due to being close to the main warehouse,  but I'm sure it can be found at hardware or home centers or other on-line vendor.  The stuff smells like barf, but works great! 
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