200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
ecblanks
Friday night I had a wakeup call to just how dangerous our hobby can be, but fortunately disaster was averted.  
We had just finished laying our new firepit and it was getting dark and the wife and I were eager to start a fire in it just to test it out . We needed light so I went to the garage and grabbed one of my ol' reliables; this 220D...
IMG_20190529_191048.jpg 
Looks good, right?
Well I had the lantern sitting on the edge of the fire pit ring while we got the fire going. When I was satisfied that the fire was going good enough I shut her down and walked it back out to a corner of the driveway to let it cool off before putting it back on the shelf.
We sat around the fire for 30 minutes or so and I decided to put the lantern up.  I approached it and there was a strong smell of fuel.  Picking up the lantern there the tell-tale puddle of fuel under neath it and a very wet bottom.  I assumed the worst, emptied it, wiped it down, and left it to rest in an aluminum pan until morning.
The next day (there was fuel in the pan) I looked and looked for an obvious pinhole but none was to be found. Even scraped and poked at a couple of areas of concern but they were solid.
I pumped it up and flipped it over and poured some water on the bottom side and saw some bubble escaping from the "A" in "Trade Mark", which showed no sign of a hole around the undisturbed coating.  Poked it with a nail and sure enough it just caved in.  
IMG_20190810_102305.jpg 
Learned a few lessons here:
1. Never take these old models for granted
2. Never set one so close to a fire (yeah this was probably an obvious one in hindsight).
3. Re-inspect each and every one of my runners, inside and out, and figure out which ones not to run on the porch, and which ones need caswells/POR 15, or just shouldn't be run anymore.   
4. Always keep a fire extinguisher nearby. 
Sometimes you have to learn the hard way, and sometimes you get lucky when you do.

This was a lantern that I rebuild fairly early on in my "career" and yes it had a rusty inside but I assumed it was just "surface rust", because the outside looked fine.

I'm exposing my ignorance here in the hopes that it keeps someone else from having a disaster.
As we say...
[afi_DoNotSetYour-1]
Carlton - 9/73
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973

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Gunhippie
I'm awful glad you caught that in time!

Now you have me wondering if I should seal the founts of all my oldies....
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Barrett
Thank you for posting and I'm glad all ended well.
The posts along these lines have changed my behavior, I did think a handy fire extinguisher in the garage was good enough.... now everything new goes outside with extinguisher and sometimes a bucket of water in hand no matter how good it is.
And I generally even light the users up just outside or in the door way so that as much as I'd hate to... it can be drenched with extinguisher or launched to a safe distance.
I have a couple of externally rusty fount bases that cleaned up seemingly solid enough,  I check for any sign of seepage regularly, so far so good, and being kero models I feel comfortable using them..... outside.

Sounds like a nice time apart from the lantern issue.
Andrew

Living and learning in NZ
Hoping to reach cognitive and emotional maturity before my children do.
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Mike
And it's another good reason to avoid the "and it had old fuel in it when I got home from the yard sale, so I lit it up" syndrome.

I'm glad it decided to whiz in your aluminum litterbox, and not as a fiery streak down your leg. No ignorance exposed in my books.

Mike.
My best gal is a Coleman outing pal!
2 1/2 minutes to Midnight...
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Dmacp
I would venture to say 50% of the lanterns owned by members here have pinholes that are rusted up so tightly they don't leak at all. But they will one day.
I've derusted founts with only a small amount of rust in them and they have pinholes. The BB dance does not remove impacted rust. Only chemicals or bead blasting. If you get a clean fount that is sound, then clean it inside and seal it with Caswells or another sealer to keep future rust away. .
Dan
ICCC member #604
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SteveRetherford
rust never sleeps !!!
[DrSteve2]    Steve , Keeper of the Light !!!
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Fj40z
This has worried me for some time. To the point I even posted a thread here asking if I was crazy for keeping all my lanterns in my basement where my gas hot water heater is. Even though the feedback in my thread was mostly reassuring that the worry was unnecessary a couple days later I couldn’t stand it anymore and I emptied about 30 lanterns with varying amounts of fuel. I then let them sit for a full day in the sun with the caps off before they went back to the basement. Definitely overkill I know but it only takes one time for things to go bad really fast. 

Glad disaster was diverted Carlton.

Stephen

Quicklite Crew #3
Coleman Slant Saver #55
275 Appreciation Syndicate member #0245

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BSAGuy
Whew!  Thanks for the reminder/warning.  Glad that didn't turn into a Molotov Coleman.
- Courtenay
Be Prepared
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ecblanks
I only ever keep one or two fueled on the shelf and I know those are sound, and I certainly don't keep them pressurized (though in changing temps yes they pressurize themselves).
I've probably run this one 10-15 times total.  When I got it, it had a very thick varnish in it which took me a long time to clean out. Honestly after 3 or 4 treatments to get the gunk out, I thought what was left in the bottom was more varnish but now I can see (now that I have a proper bore light) that it is heavy rust. The varnish ones almost seem to do worse though you'd think old petroleum residue would keep rust at bay.  Guess not.  
Carlton - 9/73
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973

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Gunhippie
Fj40z wrote:
This has worried me for some time. To the point I even posted a thread here asking if I was crazy for keeping all my lanterns in my basement where my gas hot water heater is. Even though the feedback in my thread was mostly reassuring that the worry was unnecessary a couple days later I couldn’t stand it anymore and I emptied about 30 lanterns with varying amounts of fuel. I then let them sit for a full day in the sun with the caps off before they went back to the basement. Definitely overkill I know but it only takes one time for things to go bad really fast. 

Glad disaster was diverted Carlton.


I think I recall that thread, but not the part about the gas water heater. I would definitely vote NO on that. When a lantern leaks a little in my cabin, it stinks things up. I find it and get it outside and back into the fettle queue. If I had a pilot light in the cabin, I would never keep full, pressurized lanterns in there. Especially a water heater, which has the pilot very near the floor, where gasoline fumes settle.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Dmacp
the big cause seems to be condensation in fueled founts that are left to sit for a very long time.
I would recommend removing the fuel and spraying rust preventative in the fount if it is going to sit for a spell.
Dan
ICCC member #604
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Hot Diggity
Wow!  I almost got to see you as a new blip on WITN.  Good to hear that you are safe, and that the leak didn't appear until after shut-down.  Count your blessings and keep a wet beach towel handy for runaways.  The fire extinguisher and garden hose might help put out the smoldering deck, but the wet towel will shut down a lantern or stove humanely and could save a globe.  Purple K and most other dry chemical extinguishing agents are corrosive.  ... and I'm a little too comfortable around fire, so if you have a fire, please proceed at a pace you feel comfortable with.     
Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
Milspec Syndicate #510
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0510
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #12
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #510
Tinker, Toy maker, Trash picker, Wickie, Lamp loon


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StanDahl
This post made me take a look at a lantern I hadn't looked at in a while...

I have a very nice looking 228C that had a lot of loose stuff in the fount. I thought it might be old fuel, but it stuck to a magnet. I shook a lot of rust out of, then I derusted with a citric acid/BB shake and then POR-15's Marine Clean which got it really shiny on the inside. Wanting to keep it shiny, but not likely to use it right away, I poured some ATF in it to keep it clean until I either decided to coat it with Caswell's or run it. I don't recall seeing rust spots at all after the delisting, but I hadn't checked in on it in a couple of years until today. 

The ATF is gone, it's probably wicked up all around the inside of the fount and then dried out. I can't see very clearly in there with the clunky flashlight I had on hand, but there are some small dark rust spots and lighter patches of rust among the still-clean places. The bottom of the lantern is painted, and looks perfect because of the paint. 

I thought I had a possible solution to this problem, but I'm not so sure now. Maybe I needed more ATF, maybe just a fount full of CF, or maybe the fount is seriously compromised? I don't know.
ICCC Petty Bureaucrat #CMLXII...
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Smudge
I use Red Kote on questionable or old founts. Caswells or equivalent for leaks. I also agree with Chuck about the wet towel. I've even depressurized a flaming fount with a wet towel wrapped around the fuel tank cap; and a wet towel would be perfect for quickly extinguishing a person if it came to that.
"If all the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit, for whatever happens to the beasts,
also happens to the man. Whatever befalls the Earth, befalls the sons of the Earth.” - Chief Seattle

ICCC # 1726  -  Bernz0matiC Appreciation Club #057
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Gasman64
Carlton, I'm sure glad you are OK, and the leak was discovered in a safe place.
Steve    ICCC #1012
Member Inactive as of 12/05/19

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Jbbh93
Glad you caught that and glad nobody got hurt. Same thing happened with a 243 that I had a couple years ago except mine was 3 or 4 pinholes all of a sudden. Small inspection cameras are very worth it to have for checking the fount for rust inside. 

Justin

"Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things"- George Carlin

Milspec syndicate #0824
Coleman Blues #824
Slant Savers #9
ICCC #1568

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salukispeed
Thank you for the reminder.  Always so good to share the good with the bad and how to be safe. 
Bob
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58idaho
Good reminders.  I always start my lanterns outside.  I have been lucky and not had fount holes but you never know.  These are old lanterns and you just don’t know how much abuse they have had.  Thanks for posting.
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Chucker
I had a surprise fount leak from a rust spec on a GREEN 200A. 

Proof that a not so old lantern can have issues as well. The rest of the fount and frame were in 90-95%% condition too. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Scouter_Angus
rust never sleeps !!!


I just had to post this link:

Angus

There is no armour made that can withstand the Truth. Karsa Orlong
ICCC # 1256
#001 in the Canadian Blues Syndicate (Syndicate Supreme Leader)
#058 in the Coleman Blues Syndicate
Looking for Canadian lanterns 8/30, 10/34, 4/67, 3/64, and any GPA for July 2004.

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Scouter_Angus
Sorry, wrong track:

 
Angus

There is no armour made that can withstand the Truth. Karsa Orlong
ICCC # 1256
#001 in the Canadian Blues Syndicate (Syndicate Supreme Leader)
#058 in the Coleman Blues Syndicate
Looking for Canadian lanterns 8/30, 10/34, 4/67, 3/64, and any GPA for July 2004.

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ecblanks
Ah, Neil, was just listening to him...
Carlton - 9/73
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973

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Jayhawksr
First Rule:  Don't catch yourself on fire. 
Second Rule:  See first rule.
Third Rule:  Listen to more Neil Young.
Richard (KC native and KU Alumni living in Maryland)
Rock Chalk, Jayhawk. Go KU!
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #1983.  Coleman Quick-lite Crew #36.
Mil Spec Syndicate #1983
Eagle Scout Class of '83
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holliswood
Glad you didn’t get hurt Carlton! I’ve read through several of the archived threads on different ideas and methods of storing lanterns. I’m going to add some Sta-Bil to the next gallon of CF to see if it’ll cut down or completely eliminate the condensation inside the founts. I’ve been keeping mine topped off, with no pressure, and the gas cap turned just to the point of feeling the gasket starting to touch. 
Maybe some denatured alcohol would work just as good?
-Fred

MilSpec-Ops #1278
snipesfred on Insta
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ecblanks
I still believe that keeping a good seal on the cap is 90% of the battle, and keeping crappy fuel out of the tank is another 5-8%. Most of the ones I receive that were either dry or had CF in them have sound bottoms (inside), and the ones with a sealed cap were/are spotless.  The ones that have bad seals and/or bad fuel and were kept in an open door shed didn't fare as well.  
I take good care of mine and store them in my garage dry with good seals so I'm not going to any extra effort, and I expect them to double their life span at least. For the ones that have already have significant rust, they need to be retired or treated, then go back to my original point.  
This, obviously, is my observational anecdote and has little scientific basis.  
Carlton - 9/73
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate # 0176
Slant Saver #29
Mil-Spec Ops #0973

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Weirdnerd
That is one of my paranoias ( I know some of this lanterns can be compromised by the rust cancer) early on my Petromax restoration, I had a lantern running when I went to pump it a little more and got a handful of kerosene on my hand, the pump pip had failed...had it been Coleman fuel I would be having skin grafts.
Can't sleep, squirrels will eat me....

If you need a Sun Flame Generator Model 100-107 ( for Sunflame lanterns models 105, 106, 107 and 110) give me a PM, I have close to 80 of those, 15 bucks each.


Werner
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Dmacp
Quote:
Maybe I needed more ATF, maybe just a fount full of CF, or maybe the fount is seriously compromised? I don't know


The quick way is to disassemble and lightly bead blast the bottom inside of the fount. Use a flexible rubber hose on the blast nozzle. You will find pinholes instantly. If you don't, and the whole fount bottom is clean gray inside, clean it out with non-aqueous solvent to remove the spent glass bead, blow it out and hit it with Caswells. If it is a steel fount try and do the entire inside. Condensate collects at the crown (inside bung) and drips down the pickup.

If it is already clean, ready to store, and you don't want to use Caswells, then try BullFrog Lubricant and Rust blocker spray made by Cortec Corp. 4119 White Bear Pkwy. MSP Minnesota, 55110  (651) 429-1100.
Spray Cosmoline or LPS #3 are also very good. They are soluble in Coleman fuel. These are mil-spec rust blockers and they are tested via hours of exposure of raw steel to salt spray.  You will need to use the little red tube on the spray can to get it down into the corners.
Dan
ICCC member #604
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brucesheehe
Fluid Film spray is also a good rust preventive treatment.
Bruce Sheehe
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
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rob_pontius
Here's another example of how a newer lantern can be in worse condition than an old one. This Northstar is in excellent shape otherwise. I've used it a lot. I got it 2 years ago at a gathering. Last week I came home and smelled the strong odor of fuel. I searched everywhere until I noticed a wet shelf. After pulling the rubber boot off to dry it, I noticed that it was this lantern that was leaking. It had a scratch in the paint inside of where the rubber boot sits. It was seeping there. I scratched the paint bubble and found this hole. I'm glad that I don't keep any GPA pressurized, but this one could've went South in a hurry had I pressurized and lit it up. IMG_20190804_113311689-768x1024.jpg I'm really kind of heartbroken over this one. It's been a great lantern.
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JimL
>> I’ve been keeping mine topped off, with no pressure, and the gas cap turned just to the point of feeling the gasket starting to touch. 

If you can, do a long term test, like a year, and see if the fuel is gone.   I don't go out of my way to store lanterns with fuel, but noticed that on some lanterns that I left the fuel cap pretty snug were loose after a couple of years.  I mean really loose. 

Has anyone here tried marine fogging oil to preserve the interior of the founts during storage?

-Jim

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three lefts do.
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rob_pontius
I've wondered about fogging.oil myself. I is it a lot on outboard motor and it works great. I never tried it on a lantern because I'm not sure how it will react going through the generator.
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Dmacp
Quote:
It had a scratch in the paint inside of where the rubber boot sits. It was seeping there


that's a pretty good sized hole. I wonder what caused it. Not even at the bottom of the fount. I had a 1970 200A that had a tiny pin hole right through the side of the fount. I was scratching my head over it. You might be able to get a replacement from the factory.
Dan
ICCC member #604
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MYN
Glad to hear that the worst did not take place.
For any old founts, I usually subject them to extensive rust, gunk and corrosion removal rituals. Especially for anything that's internal.
For complete rust removal down to the tiniest pits and crevices, I'd immersed the whole fount in fairly strong citric acid solution for a minimum of 48hrs. Sounds too much/severe? I don't think so. It the fount could survive that, it'd usually be cleared of all rust/corrosion products. 
If its a steel fount, the treatment would be followed by phosphoric acid to sort of passivate it to prevent further rusting.
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25 502s
rob_pontius wrote:
....I'm really kind of heartbroken over this one. It's been a great lantern.


I think OCP had a replacement fount. 
Jason
not looking for any more Bday gpas. Honestly, if you have a 10-72 don’t let me know about it.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0214
Coleman Slant Saver #56
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #31
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rob_pontius
That hole has me puzzled also. The inside of the fount has no rust except for that spot. The metal around the hole is still thick. It isn't paper thin like one would expect. 
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brucesheehe
Always fuel them and light them outside.

It is good practice to fuel and then pump them up.  Wait for awhile to see if there is any leakage before you light it.
Bruce Sheehe
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
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Hot Diggity
I've been known to tighten packing nuts on leaking lanterns while they're on fire, but I'm always respectful of the potential for disaster when working with pressurized fuel.  That's why I was a little surprised when I got doused with alcohol last night from what should have been a non-pressurized container.  Just the little plastic preheat fuel bottle with the brass spout.  I had dressed it up with a silicone jacket that had once held a bottle of hand sanitizer, and I had a nice rubber cap over the end of the nozzle to prevent spills and evaporation.  What I hadn't considered was how the bottle had swollen in the heat of the garage, and the long stream of denatured alcohol from the nozzle when I pulled off the cap was impressive...and cold.  

Lesson learned, for safety, I slide the nozzle up out of the fuel before removing the cap, and point it away from myself just in case.  It's good to know the bottles can handle the pressure of out hot summer days, but I don't need to be wasting alcohol and potentially setting myself on fire using them.
Chuck, 3/61, ICCC 1689
Milspec Syndicate #510
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate #0510
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #12
BernzOmatic Appreciation Club #510
Tinker, Toy maker, Trash picker, Wickie, Lamp loon


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Welcome to the Coleman Collectors Forum, an international forum of Coleman enthusiast and collectors, as such people from all over the world come here to read about Coleman collecting, repair, and to meet and make friends. The pages contained here are intended for the use of amateur collectors and people interested in Coleman collecting, restoration and repair as a hobby. It goes without saying to refrain from political posts, personal attacks and inflammatory posts.

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