200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
kc9ljo
I am thinking about trying different methods of refinishing lantern parts that are exposed to heat. My question is, how hot do these things get?

Thanks
Dave 
Quando omni flunkus, moritati. Looking for 1/74 B/day Lantern(Found)
Quote
slaytanicmetal76
i know the vents get to 500 to 700 degrees.have the burn marks on arm to prove it.the 500cp models get hotter.
tim #1252 lantern lover
Quote
parris001
I tried to stick the top back on an Aida where the cheesy little tabs had rotted and broke off. I put a dollop of Permatex Ultra Copper silicone on it. The package says it can handle up to 700 degrees. Well, yeah....... it caught on fire and burned away......
Quote
weasel
Can't remember the exact number, but I took a non-contact infrared thermometer to a 237 and was quite impressed by the temperature.  If you use my user name as part of a search you should be able to find the post.  If not, I'll try to find it for you.
Derek.

Looking for (Cdn where possible): 3-2006, 11-2007, 11-73 (Something nickel) 5-79 ( Something pretty for my wife ), 2-47, 10-48.
Quote
MK
I've got one of those IR thermometers, and checked the QL 327 I had running yesterday
just for grins. The lantern was only pumped up to about a medium level, and this would
not be considered the max by any means. The vent was easily running into the 500's
depending on where I pointed it. Some outside areas not that hot, but if I pointed it
to the inner side of the vent above the burners, it was jumping close to 600.
The area around the Q99 was easily in the 700's range, skirting to 800 and over if
I pointed at the right spot. Aiming at the mantles bumped over 1000 F, and I hit
the HI limit, which I assume is 1000 F for that unit.
I would expect some of my other lanterns to run hotter than that. I'll try my 220F
next time I fire it up. It's a strong, bright, and noisy runner, and I bet it's one of the
hotter running lanterns I have.
Quote
brucesheehe
Just don't take the vent nut off when they are running. 
Bruce Sheehe
ICCC #889 - Connoisseur of Time, Friends, Leisure, & Coleman   Altoona, PA - The Mountain City - Near The Eastern USA Continental Divide
Quote
prosper
I've seen the exhaust gasses hit 1450F or so, measured with a thermocouple. Vents run a few hundred degrees cooler, 1000-1100F isn't uncommon
Quote
boounga
Sorry to revive an old thread but how hot do your 200s fount / tip cleaner get? Do these larger peerless (24) mantles make a difference?

My 200A seems super hot!
Quote
desmobob
boounga wrote:
Sorry to revive an old thread but how hot do your 200s fount / tip cleaner get? Do these larger peerless (24) mantles make a difference? My 200A seems super hot!


200As, especially with larger mantles, run HOT!  Mine get hot enough to make me nervous, but I've never had a problem with it.  I wouldn't try to touch the tip cleaner after they've been running for more than 10 minutes....

Take it easy,
Bob
Bob
In the southeast corner of the Adirondack Park
Quote
boounga
Tip Cleaner 165F


Fount 117F


Just want to make sure this is safe, using 24-A peerless.

I got my first 200 last september and burned it while it was cooler with small mantles from coleman and never felt a fount so warm...


Quote
desmobob
I'll have to remember to put my non-contact thermometer in with my lantern stuff so I can get some readings when I'm burning them.  It's amazing how cool a 242 stays, compared to a 200A.  I think they painted 200As red for a reason....

Take it easy,
Bob
Bob
In the southeast corner of the Adirondack Park
Quote
boounga
Oh good to know! Thanks a lot! I posted right after I tried to dim the lantern and was concerned. Gonna try a 2C-HG. If I need light I'll light my 639 kero!!! Not worth running it like this when you can't even dim it without an oven mitt.
Quote
Deanofid
The 165 deg on the tip cleaner is not anything to be concerned about.  Neither
is the fount temp you have there. 
The lantern burns the same amount of fuel if you put on a smaller mantle.  It will
just be burning some of it outside the mantle, so you are probably making the
same amount of heat.  Anyway, the lantern is designed to withstand the heat it
makes in its factory configuration, no matter the size of mantle you put on it.
You can put a 111 mantle on a 200a but that won't make it run hotter.
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
Quote
boounga
I would agree but it makes sense to me that the mantle is about 3/4 inch longer thus transferring heat to an untouchable tip cleaner knob. I'm sticking with smaller mantles!
Quote
lamplighter44
Nice bit of research. That puts some real numbers on something we all knew..  Running a lantern in a larger tent, or tent trailer in my case, is a most effective heater.
Lamplighter44

Richard
Quote
JimDouglasJr
A hot runner will make the tip cleaner hot with either mantle.  I use a small pair of pliers if the tips need to be cleaned, or a bit of wet paper towel..
Kyle. Kaptain Kamplite - America's Finest Lantern Fettler.
Coleman 275 Appreciation Syndicate and 243 Blues Member #0031 &  J.C. Higgins aficionado.
“If you light a lamp for someone else, it will also brighten your path.” Buddhist quote.  Brand-X Super Hoarder.
Quote
Deanofid
If it has a straight pricker lever, like the 200 and 242 models do, you can put one of
those little red insulator caps on it, similar to what the small stoves have.
Dean -Midnight Kerosene Ritualist--http://www.deansmachine.com  ICCC #1220.   275 commiseration #0018.
"In Him was life, and His life was the Light of men."  John 1:4
Quote
Dennis Dowdy
Success at last!
I too had tried several approaches to repainting my model 200 gas lantern ventilator which had been chipped in a couple of places. I post this note for several reasons-1. To thank those who shared data on how hot the ventilator gets, and 2. To let others know that I found by trial and error an inexpensive but acceptable method of refinishing the ventilator which I will explain so others may find the process useful. 
First let me say that the Coleman staff are very careful to not divulge any data that would be helpful as it would perhaps allow people with older lanterns to repair rather than buy new ones. So after several phone calls I learned that Coleman would not provide any data of how hot the vent stack burns. After several attempts to locate a used lantern of same model with a vent stack in good condition, I decided to try once more to restore my damaged one. After all my original lantern made in 1974 functions as good as new.  I should also state that the product I used by VHT does not quite match the Coleman red, and turns out once cured to be a bit more orange than the original color; however, it works! When I lite my lantern now I no longer need to watch in disbelief as it cooks off my new paint.  Indeed the VHT (Very High Temperature) Flame Proof Header Paint Silica-Ceramic Coating is indeed made to handle this tough task. Rated to 1300-2000 degrees F, this product is well adapted to repairing my old lantern. I plan to submit a proposal to VHT explaining that Coleman refuses to offer a paint or similar coating, so this product could possibly be modified slightly to match the same original color. Anyway all instructions you need are on the can: you will need a safe method of curing the product once applied, so be sure you have a way to heat the newly coated ventilator to 250 degrees, then 400 degrees, then 600 degrees. To achieve 250 degrees I used my outdoor charcoal grill with an oven thomometer to obtain the correct cure temp, then for the 400 degree cure, I used by gas camping stove and some bricks to hold the vent at the level above the flame to match 400 degrees, then. For the 600 degree cure i had no thermometer that would register that high, so I rigged my lantern as follows: I used the lantern itself with an aluminum condensed milk can perch on top of the glass globe to lift the vent about 3” higher that it normally sits; giving me a method of not over heating in the final cure. I applied the coating yesterday letting it dry overnight, then today I performed all three cures and my lantern now looks very well and I do not have to worry that this coating will burn off! I tried to post a pic but was too large to be posted. If you would like to see a pic, send me a separate email with your email address.
Happy Camper
Dennis
Quote
JimL
To post an image, you just need to size it down.  If you're on Windows, 'edit' it with paint and select 640 pixels.

>>I plan to submit a proposal to VHT explaining that Coleman refuses to offer a paint or similar coating,

So far as I know, Coleman has never produced their own vents and applied the porcelain.  They certainly can't be expected to supply a paint that's a substitute for glass (porcelain).

-Jim

I wish Noah had swatted the two mosquitoes.
Quote
Chucker
You have managed to proceed to a level of vent painting few try to master. 

You'll find that paints rated at that high of a temp are all flat as far as I know. I have seen Rustoleum High Heat Ultra that is a semi-gloss black good to 1200 deg. F. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
Quote
mikew
A few years ago, a cousin of mine welded a 242 vent top cap back on for me.  The welding messed up the porcelain on the top  of the top cap so some bare metal was showing.  I painted the vent with VHT Flameproof flat black and did the curing process on the can, but our oven would only go to about 550F.  The vent held up well for quite a while, but eventually the paint around the vent holes and on the top cap peeled off in places.  The paint on the bottom rim piece is still holding fine.  My take is that the best 2000 degree paints, Rustoleum or VHT, can still only handle just so many expansions and contractions.  Had similar results on the top cap of a Perfection heater and the burners on a 413G stove that I had painted with VHT Flameproof silver.  It eventually started peeling up in little bitty bits.  Have had better results with the VHT and Rustoleum flat black than with the silver for some reason. 
Mike
"... at evening time, it shall be light." Zechariah 14:7

Slant Saver #05; Milspec Ops 0045
Quote
MYN
To handle the temperatures on those vents for long term operations, my suggestion would be 'inorganic' paints. Those without organic binders. Not your common paint, but they do exist.
Quote
scl
could not get my nickel 200 vent above 580.
Quote
Chucker
scl wrote:
could not get my nickel 200 vent above 580.


Were you trying in an oven? Did you paint the vent?

If you painted the vent...for the final VHT step run it with the vent ON and the globe OFF for 10-15 minutes. Let it cool. 
Chuck
"Stop being angry, and forget about getting back at people; do not worry -- it only causes harm." Ps. 37:8
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
Quote
Welcome to the Coleman Collectors Forum, an international forum of Coleman enthusiast and collectors, as such people from all over the world come here to read about Coleman collecting, repair, and to meet and make friends. The pages contained here are intended for the use of amateur collectors and people interested in Coleman collecting, restoration and repair as a hobby. It goes without saying to refrain from political posts, personal attacks and inflammatory posts.

Please note, all postings are the personal opinions of the members posting, the owner, administrators and moderators of the forum do not warrant the accuracy of posted information or endorse the safety of such.