200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.

Let there be 502
I acquired a near-mint 500 A single-burner stove dated 6/1966. I was dumb enough to use white gas to test it BEFORE reading its manual stating to fill fount with "gasoline."  It worked, but I still wonder if I should be using gasoline for this type of older models. 20200610_072543s.jpg

I would also like to know what the lever (Burn <> Light) actually does. I let it warm up for a good minute before I switched the lever to "Burn" position. I just didn't notice anything.

Thank you in advance, I am waiting for another 500 A from 1960 and cannot wait to actually use it on the field.
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austin65uri
Nothing dumb about using white gas (naphtha, Coleman Fuel, etc.) It's a highly refined, cleaner burning "gasoline" without the generator clogging properties of what we call today "regular unleaded gasoline" or RUG. It's the preferred fuel.
The burn/light lever when in the "light" position reduces the amount of fuel being fed to the stove and allows some air to be introduced to the mixture, making a lean mixture suitable for starting cold.  Once the generator is heated up, turning the lever to "burn" closes off the air and allows just fuel to flow.  In warm weather the difference can be minimal, and  some stoves respond differently to the lever position.  Not starting in the "light" position can result in some unpleasant flame-ups.




Bill.
ICCC#1601
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Let there be 502
Thank you Bill for your swift response. I learned a lot. Time to use it on the field.
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Gunhippie
Prior to the introduction of high-compression engines, all gasoline was "white gas"--basically camp fuel with a very low octane rating around 50-55. Ethyl gasoline (for ethyl lead) was introduced for the high-compression engines, which is why some older GPAs specify "Clean, white, unleaded gasoline". Camp fuel is how the old low-octane, no-additive gas is marketed today.

That's an amazing 500A! Mine was more rust than anything else when found.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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outlawmws
Very nice find! 

And now you know that "Gasoline" for Coleman is White Gas/Naphtha/Camp Fuel/Coleman Fuel (AKA CF)
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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Gunhippie
The "Right to light, left to burn" lever is the same as the "Up to light" lever on instant-lighting suitcase stoves. It actuates a valve that allows fount air to mix with the gasoline--same as opening the valve wheel 1/4 turn on an instant-lighting lantern.

The fact that "it did nothing" when you followed the instructions means it's working perfectly--and that you actually follow instructions, a rare skill anymore!
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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1hpycmpr
Sweet find!  To be 54 years old and look like that is a wonderful score.  It’s like you went back in time and bought it off the shelf yourself!  
Mark
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Chucker
Great score! A very sturdy stove! 
Chuck
"Pleasant words are a honeycomb, Sweet to the soul and healing to the bones." Proverbs 16:24
Eye-SEE-C-C Member #1333 -- MilSpecOps #003
"Michigan - from the Ojibwa word “meicigama,” meaning “great water.”
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Let there be 502
Thank you all, this is a wonderful forum.
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Let there be 502
How should I clean inside the fount? I assume there is more than simply emptying the fount if I were to store it for a while. I do not wish to let the fount rust on the inside like many other poorly maintained stoves.
20200612_182918.jpg 
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Majicwrench
I would just keep fuel in it.

I started my 500A one time without moving the lever to "light".  I won't forget again. They do more than just a "little" flame-up. Once a stove is good and flooded it seems to take forever before the flames will clean up.

Sweet stove. 500's are the tanks of the single burner stoves.
Keith
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outlawmws
Personally I also store everything I use regularly at all completely full.  I took a que from Timm and when I refill I often dump the remainder out, so as to get any moisture or sediment out. 

What I have added (I think)  is  then I can still use most of that as it settles quickly, and I carefully pour the clean fuel off into a handy (clean) container, clean the residue out of my 2 cup measuring cup pitcher, and pour the residue back in the measuring cup.

Back to Timm's process; I then measure the refill amount (usually takes two measured amounts) and filter that in a Coleman filter funnel with felt,  The felt take any other particles out and also any moisture.  moisture is the enemy...
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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Gunhippie
The cleanest old lanterns and stoves I've found were fueled up with CF. I always take that as a good sign when checking out a potential purchase.

The ones in the worst condition were stored for years with RUG in them.  Not only does it smell incredibly foul, but the RUG evolves something that corrodes even brass--I've had a couple where the top of the fount was rotted out.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Let there be 502
Noted all the advises with regards to the fount.

Keith, I lit the stove normally this morning and noticed that the flame was much bigger (knob was not even half way open) and blackened the grate. The lever was set to "Light" position. Was I supposed to open the fount and release the pressure yesterday when I finished using it? The instruction states that that isn't necessary.

Kindly advise whether or not I should make sure that the fount is free of pressure each time I am about to use the stove. Much appreciated.
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Gunhippie
The 500 and 500A don't seem to like a lot of pressure at start-up, and not even until the cast-iron burner and Bunsen are well warmed. At least, mine don't. I usually let the pressure off before starting and add about 10 strokes to a full fount. After about five minutes of full open, I'll pump the stove up to where I'm getting a good burn.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Majicwrench
No need to release pressure. 

Big flames, like big yellow flames?? Or nice blue flames w yellow tips??

I can't recall thinking my 500 needed low pressure, I tend to pump things pretty enthusiastically, but my recall isn't what is could be sometimes. 
Keith
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holliswood

When you turn your lever after it’s warmed up, make sure to turn it nice and easy. Don’t turn it fast. 

Not sure if the information is still available in the archives here but, long term storage suggested a full fount of camping fuel with a tablespoon or two of denatured alcohol to prevent moisture accumulating in the fount. 


How many turns of the pump and strokes of air are you starting off with? 

I’ll see if I can copy and paste the file I have saved. 

-Fred

ICCC Member #1871
MilSpec-Ops #1278
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #41
Perfection Heater Collectors #2 
CANADIAN BLUES SYNDICATE #57
Coleman Slant Saver #65

snipesfred on Insta
Big Ferd on YT
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Let there be 502
Hi Fred, I start out by pumping 10-15 times. I'll keep in mind that I turn the lever nice and slow.
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Majicwrench
There is no need to turn lever slow.
Keith
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holliswood

You don’t have to turn the lever slow just a nice gradual turn. 

On my 500, with everything functional and a new pump leather, I turn the pump two full turns and add 40 pumps on startup. That’s just how I start mine. Up to you on how many pumps you use on startup. 

-Fred

ICCC Member #1871
MilSpec-Ops #1278
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #41
Perfection Heater Collectors #2 
CANADIAN BLUES SYNDICATE #57
Coleman Slant Saver #65

snipesfred on Insta
Big Ferd on YT
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Tigerfans2
I acquired a near-mint 500 A single-burner stove dated 6/1966. I was dumb enough to use white gas to test it BEFORE reading its manual stating to fill fount with "gasoline." .


One doesn't often screw up and get it right or at least I don't.  When I screw up I do it right and get it wrong.
Coleman Slant Saver #58
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #8
Coleman Blues 243's #16
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SteveA
Once I found my 500's I never looked back.  The only other stove I use camping is an old AGM with cast iron burners.  My 502's just sit on a shelf.
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Let there be 502
@SteveA
Same here. 

@holliswood
Other than adding denatured alcohol to prevent moisture from accumulating, what about emptying the fount and leaving the fount cap open?
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outlawmws
It would collect dust/Dirt, bugs, and very likely condensation.  Not a good plan
[Logo%20Outlaw-half] 
Coleman Blue's 243's #341 - 275 Appreciation Syndicate member 0242
FAS #001 Confusing Future Generations of Collectors, One Lantern at a Time!

“A Human Being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, give orders, take orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook  a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.  Specialization is for insects.”            - Lazarus Long


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holliswood

@Let there be 502

The storage debate in storing with fuel or without fuel will excite this crowd 😆

I prefer to store mine with fuel and some DA with the filler cap somewhat between tight and snug. 

Go with what you’re satisfied with doing. 

-Fred

ICCC Member #1871
MilSpec-Ops #1278
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #41
Perfection Heater Collectors #2 
CANADIAN BLUES SYNDICATE #57
Coleman Slant Saver #65

snipesfred on Insta
Big Ferd on YT
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holliswood
outlawmws wrote:
It would collect dust/Dirt, bugs, and very likely condensation.  Not a good plan


+1
-Fred

ICCC Member #1871
MilSpec-Ops #1278
Coleman Quick Lite Crew #41
Perfection Heater Collectors #2 
CANADIAN BLUES SYNDICATE #57
Coleman Slant Saver #65

snipesfred on Insta
Big Ferd on YT
Quote
Gunhippie
The last thing you want it is to have the fount open to the air. As a sealed unit, starting with a clean and dry fount, there is only one way for moisture to get in and that's though the pump. With the fount open, every time the temperature changes, air is getting sucked in and/or expelled, bringing moisture and condensation with it.

For storage, just get the fount empty and dry, then fill with fresh camp fuel and cap it. Nothing is going in or out until you want it to.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Let there be 502
@Gunhippie
Thank you, will keep it shut with clean fuel.
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Gasman64
this is a wonderful forum.

Excluding me, of course. 😉
Just wanted to add [welcome]
Steve
ICCC #1012
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