200A and 202 reproduction
frames back
in stock.
Skydivedave
After removal of the primary burner cap to soak in evaporust, I noticed fuel puddles in the manifold. When I tilted the stove forward even more appeared. 
My first thought was that my overfilled fuel tank was the culprit. But after draining fuel to half tank it happened again  after a couple of minutes of use.

The burner flame is controllable, but when turned up it shoots a yellow flame over a foot high. 
Any help diagnosing this would be appreciated!
David 
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TwoCanoes
Check a thread titled Leaky 426 E manifold. Lots of comments that might help. My issue has not yet been solved. I'm looking for just the right parts stove.
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hikerduane
Leaking valve?  Maybe see what happens with the pressurized tank sitting outside the case and observe leakage.  Otherwise the bunsen is flooded.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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Skydivedave
Thanks two canoes, Thanks duane! 
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Majicwrench
I don't quite understand
"But after draining fuel to half tank it happened again  after a couple of minutes of use."
What happened again? Did you take burner cap off again and there is fuel in there?? 
Once a stove if flooded it takes forever for it to clean out, that's why they had a little drain cock on the older one.  Let it dry, shake it out, start it with lever up and leave it like that for a good solid minute before turning lever down.
Oh, and have match/lighter ready when opening valve. If you are opening valve and then fumbling around trying to find a fire source, you will be flooding stove.
Keith
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Skydivedave
Thanks Keith. What 'happened again' was a puddle of fuel in the manifold beneath the burner after having cleaned it up, blowing it dry and refiring it up with half tank of fuel.

I am guilty of not waiting a full minute before kicking the lever down. Not fumbling for a lighter, but a few seconds pass before it lights, perhaps long enough to flood. Finicky, these things. 
Thanks, 
David 
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Majicwrench
Still confused  (happens a lot these days) "fuel in the manifold beneath the burner"  you cannot see "inside the manifold" without pulling burner off...so I suspect we are just having a terminology issue.... is fuel puddling in the stove case??
Keith
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Skydivedave
At Duane's recommendation, I pressurized the tank freestanding and it wants to drip fuel from the generator tip with valve closed, albeit ever so slightly, like a drop per minute or less.
This seems to occur whether the lever is in light position (up} or burn position. 
Further, when pressurized and freestanding, opening the valve at least half way is necessary to achieve a stream of fuel shooting out.
The generator is slightly bent at the threaded end nearest the tank. The fuel rod moves in and out just fine when adjusting the valve.
As you can see from the picture it flames up quite a bit when opening the valve.  Click image for larger version - Name: MVIMG_20190707_154833_compress58.jpg, Views: 46, Size: 147.06 KB
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hikerduane
Lighting lever needs to be UP.  Miss it for this pic?
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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Skydivedave
Majic, I removed the burner to find fuel in the manifold beneath the burner.

Duane, oops on the lever. But should not the generator tip be dry and free of fuel when pressurized and valve in the off position? 
Thanks guys! 
David 
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Gunhippie
In your picture, the lighting lever is down, so you're feeding the stove pure, unvaporized gasoline. The lever must be up to light and stay up until the stove has been burning with nothing but blue flame for a bit, unless you're using a torch to pre-heat.

A drip a minute is not a a minor leak. The tip of the valve stem is probably eroded from being over-tightened by a PO. Suitcase stove, due to the long generator, take a minute or more to shut down after the valve is closed, causing folks to want to really crank the valve shut, which just damages it.

On the instruction sheet that came with a stove I bought a while back--no idea what model--was a suggestion for shutting down, right from Coleman: Turn the lighting lever up for a minute before shutting the valve down. This will flush much of the fuel out of the gen, and shut down is faster and cleaner.

I would look at finding a new valve for it. It is possible to repair a damaged valve, but because the needle is threaded into the end of the valve stem, it's about 50-50 that you will snap the rod off when trying to unscrew it.
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Skydivedave
Fuel in the manifold.  Click image for larger version - Name: MVIMG_20190707_155016_compress52.jpg, Views: 47, Size: 199.63 KB
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hikerduane
Gunhippie gave a good explanation, a new valve at least sounds in order.
Duane 
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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Majicwrench
Hence all the yellow flames...... surprised if you get drips from generator you can shut stove down. And with all that fuel....that should burn for quite a while even with tank and generator removed!!!!  So does stove shut off?? 
 Generator, especially if not up to temp, will have liquid fuel in it and might drip a bit, but that should not last for long.

The amount of fuel in that burner is NOT from a drip a minute, so I am still a bit confused....
And you do need lever UP!!  
Keith
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Skydivedave
OK thanks gunhippie. Valve replacement sounds expensive. I'll revisit and be sure the gen heats thoroughly before turning the lever to burn position. Thanks! 
David
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macwacs
Generator is stuck and not working properly. Need to completely disassemble and try to salvage by cleaning all parts there in.
 RMW
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Skydivedave
Operator error, that did it. Full minute with lever up is critical. No more puddling of fuel, and valve is wide open in the pic. 
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Skydivedave
Oops, the Pic  Click image for larger version - Name: MVIMG_20190707_165141_compress65.jpg, Views: 43, Size: 304.77 KB
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hikerduane
"Up to light"
Sometimes you need to be a little mechanically inclined, powers of observation.
Duane
Duane-All seasons, year round backpacker and camper.  So many stoves who's counting.
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Gunhippie
Cool. That orange in the flame will probably go away after running the stove for a while. It's usually just dust and rust in the burner assy.

But if it still drips when shut down: http://www.oldcolemanparts.com/product.php?productid=296&cat=&page=2
It's priceless until someone puts a price on it.
Walk a mile in a man's shoes before you criticize him--then you're a mile away, and he has no shoes.
Texan's last words: "Y'all--hold my beer--I wanta' try sumptin'."
Timm--Middle of nowhere, near the end of the road, Oregon.
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Skydivedave
Thanks again guys. I haven't run the stove more than 3 or 4 minutes so I'm sure some characteristics will change, hopefully for the good! Many thanks for all the help! 
David 
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